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Electrical Circuits

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by

Amy Cao

on 16 May 2016

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Transcript of Electrical Circuits

Electrical
Circuits

let's take a journey around a circuit
1. POWER

2. SWITCH

3. LOAD

3. WIRES

All circuits need a
source.
This is usually something like a
battery
, and provides
energy
to the circuit.
The symbol used is consists of 2 or 4 lines, alternating in length
Circuits need a
This

connects
or
disconnects
the flow of electricity in the circuit, and is found commonly in "on and off" switches!
Drawn like this,
the switch is "open".
No electricity can pass through like this!
let electricity
pass through.
Wires make the circuit, allowing
electrons
, which are carrying
negative charges
, to move.
This has to be
continuous
- a circuit won't work if the loop is broken!
these guys!
Take a Video Break
(without breaking our circuit!)
use the energy
in a circuit
s
Loads include things like motors (energy for movement) and lightbulbs (energy for light)
There are at least 4 things you MUST have in a circuit! They are:
Batteries provide the circuit with
VOLTAGE
This is also known as how much "push" or "potential" an electron has to move around a circuit.
Voltage is measured in Volts (V) by a Voltmeter in a circuit.
Electrons can move in a circuit because the electrons around metal nuclei are very loosely bound. With a slight push from the battery they move from one metal atom to another.
This movement of electrons is called
CURRENT
This is measured in amperes (A) using an ammeter.
Loads usually also provide
RESISTANCE
This is how difficult it is for an electron to move through a circuit and is measured in ohms.
Current moving through a wire with higher resistance produces more heat and light. As many electrical appliances need this, loads are often classified as resistors.
Full transcript