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Copy of Sonnet 55

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Jessie Badecao

on 29 November 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55
Not marble nor the gilded monuments
Of princes shall outlive this powerful rime,
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish
time.
When wasteful war shall statues overturn.
And broils root out the work of masonry,
nor Mars his sword nor War's quick fire shall
burn.
'Gainst death and all oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall find room.
Even in the eyes of all posterity
that wear this world out to the ending doom.
So, till the judgement that yourself arise,
You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes. Sonnet 55
Original
1.Not marble nor the gilded monuments
2.Of princes shall outlive this powerful rime,
3.But you shall shine more bright in these contents
4.Than unswept stone, besmeared with sluttish
time.
5.When wasteful war shall statues overturn.
6.And broils root out the work of masonry,
7.nor Mars his sword nor War's quick fire shall
burn.
8.'Gainst death and all oblivious enmity
9.Shall you pace forth; your praise shall find room.
10.Even in the eyes of all posterity
11.that wear this world out to the ending doom.
12.So, till the judgement that yourself arise,
13.You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes. Sonnet 55
Modern English
1.Neither marble nor the gilded tombs
2.of princes will outlive this powerful poetry,
3.but you will shine more brightly in these pages
4.than those neglected buildings that crumble to
dust, besmirched by heartless time.
5.When devastating war overturns statues,
6.and battles uproot buildings,
7.neither the sword of Mars nor the quick-burning
fires of war
8.shall destroy this living record of your memory.
9.You will continue on strong in the face
10.the successive generations that will live in this poetry
11. that will wear this world out will continue till dooms day
12.so till the Day of Judgement, when you will be raised up,
you will live in this poetry
13.and remain in the eyes of the lovers who read this Dissecting it Meaning Form and Style
creates imagery of war
will bring light to hard times this poem. "this powerful rime" refers to this powerful poem
He is saying that nothing can outlive his powerful poetry and words will always be stronger then even the strongest buildings or statues.
Eventually they will all crumble away while the poem will remain. Physical objects such as marble and statues cannot be destroyed easily but the poet states the poem will last longer then the monuments, He states that even the God of War cannot destroy this poem
it will last until judgement day or end of time “Nor Mars his Sword nor war's quick fire shall burn/ the living
reward reward of your memory.” is he is comparing something physical like the sword of Mars
to something mentally like memory. Which cannot be destroyed by a sword of the God of war. He is telling as the future and how it would be in the first three quatrains, then in the last two
lines changes to present because he wanted to tell the reader that the future is alot like the
present now. “You live in this”, telling that there isn't a big difference of the future and present
in this poem. Questions?? :) Poetic Devices Used
Imagery - “gilded monuments, wasteful war shall statues overturn, Nor Mars his sword nor war's
quick fire shall burn” Creates an image of war and destruction all throughout the poem.

Irony - “Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn, The living record of your memory.” The God of war cannot touch memories or do anything to take them away from you

Metaphor - “So, till the judgment that yourself arise, You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.” He is saying that memories can outlive strong buildings and even time itself; you will always remain. Poet
The Author of this poem is one of the greatest play writers that ever lived. He wrote some great plays like Macbeth, Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice and so on. If you guessed Shakespeare then your right. He did not just write plays but also Poetry, called sonnets. To add to the number of play he did he wrote 154 sonnets in his life time.
Born Stratford in 1564- 1616.
Married to Anne Hatheway and had three kids, Susanna, Hamnet and Judith.
Created by: Marco, Andrew, Darren, Eric, Denzel
Full transcript