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Organizational Ecology

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by

Whitney Wemett

on 11 November 2013

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Transcript of Organizational Ecology

One Friday afternoon, I volunteered at the Farm with fellow students, staff and faculty. Here, we harvested organic and sustainably-grown produce for local nonprofit organizations to distribute to neighbors that lack access to nutrious food.
As I was walking around campus, I saw a large truck carrying away two trees that had been cut down in order to preserve the aesthetic beauty of the College’s infrastructure and landscape.
As a first-year student before proposing ideas of my own about how the College could be more sustainable, I decided to attend the Environmental Stewardship Council. Here, students, staff and faculty participate in productive and collaborative discussion about how to achieve a more environmentally friendly campus.
I attended a program on how the Congregation of the Holy Cross informs Stonehill’s mission of creating a more just and compassionate world, as well as how the Catholic Church is committed to the stewardship of the Earth. Along with my peers, professors and staff members, I was able to discuss how individuals at Stonehill can adopt more sustainable habits, such as participating in composting and recycling in the Commons.
While in the Commons one afternoon, I saw a student requesting more organic foods by posting on the Napkin Board. Since I joined Food Truth, one of the many student-lead clubs on campus, I invited her to attend the Banana Split to Commit event that evening. Here, students were able to sign a petition to have Dining Services incorporate more real food into its meal options.
Leaving the Commons I noticed a farmer’s market downstairs near the student mailboxes, which had apples, pumpkins, apple cider, and soda from a variety of farms located in Massachusetts.
Organizational Ecology at Stonehill College
Project done by:
Michael Ellis
Whitney Wemett
Katherine Bryer
Chanel Mazzone
As a prospective student to Stonehill College, the Marketing Department mailed me dozens of elaborate materials that ended up in the recycling bin, even ones about the College’s commitment to sustainability.
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