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Tips on Summary writing

Guidelines for comprehension
by

Stefania Firetto

on 8 October 2012

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Transcript of Tips on Summary writing

Summary Writing Step 1 Read the whole
passage and looking for all the important ideas and facts.
. As you read, you can UNDERLINE all the important points and all the important evidence.
(Eg. You can identify the Topic Sentences).

Step 2 Identify points that are relevant from
the passage and taking notes.
ANNOTATE:
[Place brackets around the main idea.]
Underline key words and phrases that support the main idea.
Cross out any information that is not important. Step 3 Write a summary that includes all the important information you’ve identified.
Paraphrase - don't copy the exact words from the reading; try to put the information in your own words. Remember:
Don't put your own opinions, ideas, or
interpretations into the summary!!! Step 4 Step 3 Write a summary that includes all the important information you’ve identified.
Paraphrase - don't copy the exact words from the reading; try to put the information in your own words. Remember:
Don't put your own opinions, ideas, or
interpretations into the summary!!! Express in one sentence the thesis
or main idea of 0the article.
A good model for your first
sentence is to include
the author's name, the title,
and the thesis. Step 5 Write your first draft, using what you have underlined and
written. You can
keep this draft
simple by following
the order of ideas in the original Step 6 Write a shorter version of your first draft. This time you can make a decision about the order of ideas and essential information. Step 7 Keep quotations short.
It's usually better not to quote entire sentences.
Summarize a portion of the quotation and quote only the most important words. Step 8 Read your summary carefully to make sure that the meaning of the original article would be clear to someone who has not read it. Paraphrasing Paraphrasing Paraphrasing is a technique in which students rephrase a text in their own words, attempting to retain the original meaning and information.A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage When paraphrasing, it is important to keep the original meaning and to present it in a new form.
You can be accused of plagiarism if you change only a few words from the original source and use that as your summary or paraphrase. Be careful to use your own words and sentences. Paraphrasing Sentences Here are some sentences that have been paraphrased:
Original: Giraffes like Acacia Leaves and they can consume 75 pounds of food a day.
Paraphrase: A giraffe can eat up to 75 pounds of Acacia Leaves everyday. Some examples to compare The original passage:
Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore, you should strive to limit the amount of exact transcribing of source materials while taking notes. Lester, James D. Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 46-47. A plagiarized version:
Students often use too many direct quotations when they take notes, resulting in too many of them in the final research paper. In fact, probably only about 10% of the final copy should consist of directly quoted material. So it is important to limit the amount of source material copied while taking notes. A legitimate paraphrase:
In research papers students often quote excessively, failing to keep quoted material down to a desirable level. Since the problem usually originates during note taking, it is essential to minimize the material recorded verbatim (Lester 46-47).
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