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THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SURFACES ON HOW HIGH A BASKETBALL BO

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donnetta johnson

on 21 March 2014

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Transcript of THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SURFACES ON HOW HIGH A BASKETBALL BO

HOW WILL DIFFERENT SURFACES AFFECT HOW HIGH A BASKETBALL BOUNCES?
THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SURFACES ON HOW HIGH A BASKETBALL BOUNCE
I THINK THE HARD SURFACES WILL AFFECT THE BASKETBALL BY MAKING IT BOUNCE HIGHER BECAUSE SOME SURFACES ARE ROUGH AND OTHERS ARE SMOOTH WHILE SOME ARE SOFT AND OTHER HARDER. SOFTER SURFACES ABSORB MORE ENERGY THAN OTHERS.
HYPOTHESIS
INDEPENDENT VARIABLE: DIFFERENT SURFACES

DEPENDENT VARIABLE: HOW HIGH THE BALL BOUNCES
VARIABLES
Prepare the wall, or other vertical panel, next to the first surface you want to test so that you can measure the height of the basketball's bounce.
On the wall next to the surface, use a tape measure and the blue painter's tape to mark every 20 centimeters (cm), starting from the floor and going up to 100 cm. You should end up with five tape marks, as shown in Figure 3 below.
Note: You can make the tape marks longer than the ones in Figure 3, so they will be easier to see in the video recording. Remember to put the top edge of the tape at the every 20 cm mark.
Procedures 1
Set up the video camera so that all of the marked measurements and the floor are in view. It is best to record the bounce as straight on, or as evenly framed in the viewfinder, as possible. You can either have a volunteer run the camera for you, or set the camera up on a tripod.
Tip: If you use a mini tripod, you need a raised surface nearby, such as a chair, to set the tripod and camera on.
Test the basketball on the surface:
Procedures 2
Repeat step 3 at least nine more times with the surface you just tested, for a total of at least ten trials of this surface.
If, in any of the trials, it looks as if the ball did not bounce straight back up, but went slightly to the side, then do an additional trial.

Procedure 3
Repeat steps 1 to 4 with the other surfaces you wanted to test.
Procedure 4
RESEARCH QUESTION
Control and Experimental Groups
Experimental Group: Hard surfaces
Control Group: The normal surfaces
MATERIALS
Basketball,different surfaces, tape measure, video tape, volunteer to hold the lab notebook, and painters tape
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
When a basketball bounces, it has two different types of energy: kinetic energy and potential energy. Kinetic energy is the energy an object has due to motion. Any object that is moving has kinetic energy. A fast-moving basketball has more kinetic energy than a slow-moving basketball. And a basketball that is not moving at all has no kinetic energy. Potential energy is the energy stored in an object due to its height above the ground. (A basketball resting on the floor has no potential energy.) For example, when you hold a basketball at waist level, it has some potential energy. If you hold it higher, such as up over your head, it has even more potential energy. If you drop the basketball, the force of gravity pulls it down, and as the ball falls, its potential energy is converted to kinetic energy. As the ball approaches the ground, its potential energy decreases.Some of the energy is also absorbed by the court's surface. When a collision occurs where kinetic energy is lost, it is called an inelastic collision. (On the other hand, an elastic collision is when kinetic energy is conserved - it is the same before and after the collision.) When a basketball bounces (without being pushed down), it does not go all the way back up to its original height, as shown in Figure 2 below. This is because the basketball had an inelastic collision with the ground. After a few bounces, it stops bouncing completely. The energy has left the ball!
RESULTS
As i recorded my information i realized that the different surfaces did effect the bounce of the ball. the harder the surface the higher the bounce , the softer the surface the shorter the bounce. therefore my hypothesis is correct.
DATA TABLE
CONCLUSION
in this project i noticed that my hypothesis was correct the surface does effect the height that the ball goes.
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