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Do Cut Flowers Live Longer in Water, Salt Water, or Sugar Wa

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by

Emily Long

on 1 November 2013

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Transcript of Do Cut Flowers Live Longer in Water, Salt Water, or Sugar Wa

Do Cut Flowers Live Better in Fresh Water, Salt Water, or Sugar Water?

By: Emily Long

Results
After 3 weeks, the salt water lasted 11 days, the fresh water lasted 17 days, and the sugar water lasted 23 days.
Conclusion
Overall, my hypothesis was right. The sugar water eventually allowed the flowers to survive longer than the fresh and salt water. Based on my research, the sugar water gave the flower a longer time to live, because it had an efficient way to get its "food"/ energy.
Materials
3 vases/jars
2 tablespoons of salt
2 tablespoons of sugar
3 cups of water
9 flowers (3 for each vase/jar)
room temperature area (not too much sunlight)
pencil and paper/ computer
scissors
Process
Collect your vases, salt, sugar, and water
Heat 1 cup of water and mix in the 2 tablespoons of sugar until the solvent is dissolved into the solute and pour (carefully) into the vase/jar
Heat another cup of water, mix the salt in thoroughly, and pour mixture into the vase (with caution)
Pour in 1 cup of water into the third vase
Label vases with the type of mixture
Let vases sit out over night to let mixtures cool
Gather flowers (12) and place 4 into each vase/jar
(before placing into the vases/jars, cut ends underwater to freshen the cells and to shorten, renew the water vessels, and to keep air from entering the stem)
Record rate of wilting from every other day for an average 3-week period and chart/graph
Research
Hypothesis
I believe that sugar water will prolong the life of cut flowers because they need glucose (sugar) to survive initially and since they are deprived of their leaves that help with photosynthesis, the sugar water will serve as a means of transportation of food to the cut plant.
www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/dg7355.html
www.phschool.com/science/biology_place/biocoach/.../overview.html‎
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/questions/question/2963/
During photosynthesis (when a plant makes its own food), the plant uses the sun's solar energy and turns it into chemical energy to utilize carbon dioxide and water and turn it into sugar (glucose) and oxygen.
Water helps transport nutrients (by osmosis) to the plant and is a factor for photosynthesis.
Salt raises the freezing point and decreases the evaporation and boiling point of water.
Naturally, a plant needs air, water, soil, and space to grow.
When wilting, a cut flower can only stay fresh for a short, limited time because they're deprived of their roots and and are limited of the nutrients that they need
Glucose is a simple sugar carbohydrate used for energy in cellular respiration
Variables
Dependent- the rate at which the flowers wilt
Independent- the type of water used
Controls- the species of flower


Quantitative- the amount of time it takes for the flowers to wilt, how many flowers and vases used, and amount of salt, sugar, and water
Qualitative- the color change between flowers and color of water
What I Would Do Next
Categories
Day 1
Day 3
Day 5
Day 7
Day 9
Day 11
Salt Water
Fresh Water
Sugar Water
Averages
Salt Water
Fresh Water
Sugar Water
Fresh
Fresh
Fresh
Slight
Wilting
in Leaves
Fresh
Fresh
Fresh
Slight
Wilting
in Leaves
Slight
Wilting in
Leaves
Flowers
Beginning
to Wilt
Flowers
Drooping
Flowers
Fresh
Flowers
Fresh
Flowers
Beginning
to Wilt
Flowers
Fresh
Flowers Wilted
Day 13
Day 15
Day 17
Day 19
Day 21
Day 23
Flowers
Still
Wilting
Leaves
Wilted
Petals &
Center are
Brown
Flowers
Wilted
Flowers
Fresh
Flowers
Fresh
Leaves
Wilted
Flowers
Fresh
Flowers
Fresh
Flowers
Turning
Brown
Flowers
Wilted
11 Days
17 Days
23 Days
Salt Water
Fresh Water
Sugar Water
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Type of Water
Days
Days It Took for the Flowers to Wilt
Data/Chart
If I were to repeat this experiment,
I would try to use a variety of flowers, with multiple trials, and have more variables concerning the type of liquid used to sustain the flowers.
Full transcript