Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Dome mountains, Fold mountains,Volcamoes and Collision mount

No description

narek kagramanian

on 28 April 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Dome mountains, Fold mountains,Volcamoes and Collision mount

Distinguished by large-scale folding, fold mountains are caused by lateral compression and simultaneous or subsequent uplift of stratified rocks. Simple fold mountains form where sediments have been folded by sliding over a basement of igneous or metamorphic rocks. The process is somewhat analogous to pushing a carpet lying on a floor up against a wall to form large rumples. Such mountains exhibit sequences of straight, parallel valleys and ridges. The valleys are carved out of the softer rocks, and the more resistant rocks remain as ridges. Examples of fold mountains include the Appalachian Mountains of North America and the Swiss Jura bordering France and Switzerland
Fold mountains
On Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. A mid-oceanic ridge, for example the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has examples of volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has examples of volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. By contrast, volcanoes are not usually created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the Earth's crust in the interiors of plates, e.g., in the East African Rift, the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and the Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "Plate hypothesis" volcanism.[1] Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth.
Dome mountain
Continental collision is a phenomenon of the plate tectonics of Earth that occurs at convergent boundaries. Continental collision is a variation on the fundamental process of subduction, whereby the subduction zone is destroyed, mountains produced, and two continents sutured together. Continental collision is known only from this planet and is an interesting example of how our different crusts, oceanic and continental, behave during subduction.
Dome mountains, Fold mountains,Volcanoes and Collision mountain
Dome mountains are formed where a region of flat-lying sedimentary rocks is warped or bowed upward making a structural dome. Their topography is characterized by a relatively flat, dissected surface sloping gradually toward the surrounding lowlands, or basins. The diameters of the bases of dome mountains range up to hundreds of kilometers. These mountains may also result from the erosion of a structural dome. Typical examples of domed mountains include the Black Hills of South Dakota and the Weald in southeast England.

Fold mountains are mountains formed mainly by the effects of folding on layers within the upper part of the Earth's crust. In the time before either plate tectonic theory developed, or the internal architecture of thrust belts became well understood, the term was used for most mountain belts, such as the Himalayas. The term is still fairly common in physical geography literature but has otherwise generally fallen out of use except as described below. The forces responsible for formation of the fold mountains are called orogenic movements. The term orogenic has derived from a Greek word meaning mountain building. These forces act at tangent to the surface of the earth and are primarily a result of plate tectonics.

Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. Volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere or troposphere; however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the stratosphere. Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines.
Imigas of types of mountains
Full transcript