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What are reasons and evidence? ARQ 3, 7, 8

Session 3
by

Elise Takehana

on 12 November 2013

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Transcript of What are reasons and evidence? ARQ 3, 7, 8

Reasons are upheld by evidence
A claim or conclusion is supported by reasons
When considering reasons for an argument, be critical of your reasons, open to reasons you had not considered yourself, research with purpose, and keep current on your research.
Reasons: rationales for why someone should believe your claim/conclusion
Evidence: specific information offered as proof.
How do I make my reasoning clear?
Use signal words like "in view of" or "is supported by"
Give your reader a blueprint of your reasoning in the introduction
Make your reasons clear
The greater the quality and quantity of evidence, the more dependable and persuasive your argument becomes.
look for publicly verifiable or peer-reviewed evidence. Scrutinize its quality, evidence, methods, and wording.
Offer evidence that it dependable
Intuition cannot be verified
Check the validity of less reliable forms of evidence
anticipate any questions or counterarguments your reader may offer.
explain or offer background information on your data and how it was gathered.
Offer enough evidence to convince
Was the research process explained?
Is the publication reputable?
Does the author question her research?
Is the evidence detailed?
Are there biases or distortions present?
Personal experience is specific and thus may not represent a scenario fully.
Case examples can be emotionally charged and may not represent the average outcome or experience.
Testimonials may be motivated by personal interest, could omit key information, or be selected by an interested party.
Some people cited as "authorities" on a topic are not always authorities but endorsers. Consult many authorities and check for personal interest.
Check original sources. Make sure the data cited is actually true.
Are Botox injections a safe alternative to face-lifts? According to an interview with Dr. N.O. Worries published in Cosmo, there are no dangerous side effects associated with Botox injections. Dr. Worries performs hundreds of Botox injections each month, is well established as a physician in New York City, and has her own private practice. She claims she has never had a serious problem with any of her injections and her patients have never reported any side effects. Furthermore, Hollywood's Association for Cosmetic Surgeons officially stated in a press release that Botox has never been shown to cause any negative effects, despite what other physicians might argue.
What is the claim? What reasons are offered? Scrutinize the reasons and evidence.
Full transcript