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Censorship

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by

Jonathon VanBrunt

on 2 September 2013

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Transcript of Censorship

Censorship on Nazis and
Anti-Semitic Acts
Media
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Examples
What is Censorship?
Censorship is the control of the information and ideas circulated within a society. In the 20th Century, censorship was achieved through the examination of books, plays, films, television and radio programs, news reports, and other forms of communication for the purpose of altering or suppressing ideas found to be objectionable or offensive
Examples
Censorship in US
In the United States, we censor
obscenity more than anything.

The Federal Communications
Commission (FCC) regulates interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable in all 50 states, the District of Columbia
and U.S. territories.
Interview with Michelle Paschal
Vanessa interviewed a German friend of
her's about the topic of Censorship.

Michelle lives here in the United States
and is married to an American but was
born and raised in Germany.
How is censorship
different in the USA
than in Germany?
Censorship
Interview Analysis
While watching, which would
you find suitable for
young children to watch?
By Jonathon VanBrunt & Vanessa Jimison
Which would
you choose?
o Public Decency Laws
o Movie Ratings
o "Dirty words" censored on public airways.
o "Parental Advisory" stickers on CDs and video games.
o News broadcasting.
Media
Germany Allows
o Obscenity on Television.

o Can say "dirty words" on public airways.

o "Soft core" pornography after prime-time.

o Movie ratings are voluntary instituted by movie theaters, stores, and rental stores.

o News broadcasting.
Für den Sommer legen wir noch was drauf
For the summer we put on it something else.
My gut instinct says delicate skin. This is cream twice as beautiful. Finally, now there's also delicate asses.
Mein bauchgefühl sagt zarte haut. Diese Creme doppelt schön. Endlich, Jetzt gibt's auch zarte Knackärsche.
• Germany Censors Content
o Neo-Nazi propaganda.

o Anti-Semitism.

o Political Radicals.

o Hitler’s “Mein Kampf” is not sold anywhere in Germany.

o No movies depicting WWII in a positive sense with the Nazis.
USA Allows Conent
o The topic of Nazis is more openly allowed than that in Germany.

o Movies and video games are allowed portraying WWII and Nazi Germany.

o Hitler’s “Mein Kampf” is available for purchase on amazon.com.
Censorship in Media
Michelle states that certain differences came to mind right away between the censorship in Germany vs the United States, she said the major differences to her are with respect to nudity – in Germany there is toplessness in public beaches and pools, prime time TV nudity is common, and even breastfeeding in public isn’t shunned or made a big deal out of.
Another point Michelle brought up regarding censorship is that she thinks it is funny and ridiculous that the radio stations here bleep out the swear words. In Germany they don’t do this.
The Zero-Tolerance in the USA
Michelle brought up the zero tolerance policy in our schools here in the States, and was incredulous about the extreme measures that are taken when children behave as children normally would. She is shocked at the no-touching rules even in the lowest grades of school, and thinks that this kind of extreme “protection” is dehumanizing.
Censorship on names in Germany
She states she was not aware of the law until a friend ran into the issues with the law after marrying an African American and having a child. The couple wanted to give the baby a name that reflected his African America heritage, and had to apply to get the name approved by the government.
On the subject of nudity and privacy, Michelle states that her husband, who is American, drives her crazy. Before he will undress to take a shower or go to bed, he “freaks out” and has to shut all the blinds and make sure no one can see him. She finds it amusing that he goes to such lengths to cover up.
Censorship on Nazis
Michelle feels that although Germany is very bureaucratic, she feels that she is more restricted here in the United States. She expressed that she is at times apprehensive about displaying pride in her home country, for fear of being labeled a Nazi.
She elaborated that she doesn't believe the number of Jews and other people reported murdered could be accurate. She tilted her head and said, “I'm not saying it was okay, but I just don't know about those numbers. Hitler would have had to be importing Jews! There are only so many people living in Germany – and only so many Jews could have been. And again, I'm not saying it was okay, but at least Hitler gave the Jews a warning. He told them to leave!
She was asked what differences we might see if we read about WWll events in a German history book and then compared it to an American history book, she was quick to state that Germany doesn’t deny what happened, but that the general attitude is to learn from it, and not to repeat it. However, she then went on to say that even after everything was said and done, she still questions the numbers.
There seemed to be a lot of sensitivity about the word Nazi and that entire chapter in history, so she was asked how things are today? She states there are small groups that are skinheads and a very few people that still identify themselves as Nazi. She said that those people are kind of seen as weirdos and that to declare oneself a Nazi is to socially alienate yourself.
Nazis and WWII
Sources
http://math-www.uni-paderborn.de/~axel/us-d.html#tv


http://sandlander.blogspot.com/2011_09_01_archive.html
Special thanks to Michelle.
http://courses.cs.vt.edu/cs3604/lib/Censorship/International/compare.htm
Leopold Museum
Located in Vienna, Austria. Home to one of the largest collections of modern Austrian art. Known as the"Louvre of Austria".
In 2012, the museum opened a new exhibition all about nude men titled, "Nackte Männer"
The museum felt as though previous exhibitions on the theme of nudity have mostly been limited to female nudes. The Leopold Museum showed an exhibition on the diverse and changing depictions of naked men from 1800 to the present. The exhibit closed on March 4, 2013.
Nudity in Europe
Do you agree or disagree with how Germany or the US governments censor content to the citizens?
Full transcript