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Copy of Lean Thinking Using A3 Problem Solving

A review by Darrell Damron of the book A3 Problem Solving which was written by Jamie Flinchbaugh.
by

Bill Dodge

on 18 December 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Lean Thinking Using A3 Problem Solving

Lean Thinking Using A3 Problem Solving
BACKGROUND &
PROBLEM STATEMENT
TARGET
CONDITION
CURRENT
CONDITION
STEPS, SCHEDULE &
MEASUREMENTS
This Prezi is an overview of Jamie Flinchbaugh's book A3 Problem Solving.
Now, let's look at an overview of the 4-quadrant method you can use to make your problem solving thinking visible on a single piece of paper.
Background & Problem Statement
Current Condition
Target Condition
Steps, Schedule & Measurements
What to Do
What to Avoid
In this section you write about a problem you can currently observe in the current condition of your process or work.
In this section you write about what you know & how you know it, as well as what you need to learn & how you will learn it.
In this section you write about how you want the process or conditions to be in the future.
In this section you write about who is going to do what, by when, to work toward the target condition.
Now, let's look at what to do and what to avoid in each of the 4-quadrants when you are making your problem solving thinking visible.
Make sure your problem statement is about the actual, current observable condition.
Go observe what's actually happening!
Rewrite your problem statement as you learn things.
Don't turn this into a long-term research project.
Don't get hung up on the format - it's not about the form, it's about making your thinking visible!
Use a pencil and erase & rewrite as you learn new things - it's not about the form, it's about making your thinking visible and learning with others.
This is a learning tool. Connect your hypothesis to your actions so you learn from this process.
You can go out of order - write what you know & revise it later.
This is just a way to make your thinking visible as you're removing barriers to delivering value to your customers.
Draw simple pictures!
A3 thinking is driven by our beliefs and our behaviors, and our behaviors drive results. When everyone believes in the power of making thinking visible, you will have a culture that delivers results to your customers.
Go see what's actually happening.
Remember to acknowledge the good things you are already happening.
Document what you need to learn and how you will learn it; use the simplest approach.
Don't jump right to solutions before you deeply understand the actual current conditions.
Don't focus on what you already understand; focus in on what you don't currently understand.
There is no place for arrogance.
Make this a tangible, clear vision of how you want the process or conditions to be.
The target condition should make clear the gap between the current and target conditions.
Involve others and build agreement about this.
Don't state this as the solution to the problem; the target condition is a statement about how you want the process or conditions to be on the way toward meeting the challenge or vision.
The target should be the result - not the actions to achieve it.
Focus on actions that will remove barriers to achieving the target condition.
Be sure to include who will do what by when.
Be clear about the how - the method or technique that will be used to get the what done.
Don't forget to manage the follow up using the Plan, Do, Study, Act cycle.
Don't state the problem in the form of a solution. "We don't have enough ovens" implies a solution. "We don't have enough oven capacity" states a problem.
Now, here are some tips as you go on your way to making your problem solving thinking visible.
Learn to make your thinking visible as you remove barriers to delivering value to your customers.
Flow of the Thinking
Content
Tips & Advice
Making our thinking visible is helping Washington state government deliver results that matter to Washingtonians!
http://www.results.wa.gov
http://www.a3problemsolving.com
Full transcript