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Maslow's Hierarchy Meets Cormac McCarthy's The Road

NCTE Conference, 2012, Las Vegas
by

Stephanie Pixley

on 17 November 2012

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Transcript of Maslow's Hierarchy Meets Cormac McCarthy's The Road

Maslow's Hierarchy meets
Cormac McCarthy's The Road Unit Essential Questions Why do individuals lose their ideals, values, and sense of right and wrong?
What is the purpose of institutions of law and order?
Will the individual be forced make sacrifices in order for humanity to survive?
How do our needs influence the decisions we make?
How is McCarthy use language to make the post-apocalyptic world of The Road seem so real and utterly terrifying? Opening Activities: Setting the Scene Pre-Reading: Google Form https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEZRTTJseWdndG9vdmdzdGYteEdGMVE6MQ CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) Visualizing the Text Stephanie Pixley
Colette Bennett Wamogo High School
Regional School District 6
Litchfield, CT Analyzing Tone

Students examine and group words selected from The Road into 3 self-created categories.

Students make predictions about the content and tone of the novel.

Create word strips illustrating the meaning of words with the most powerful connotations.

Discuss categories and illustrations.

Place illustrated words on desk and allow students to shop for words they will use to create found poetry. Found Poetry Reading Activities
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Flipping the Classroom: Maslow's Hierarchy

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/61085668/Maslow%27s%20Demo%20Page The Road Apocalyptic Journaling

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/61085840/Apocalyptic%20Journaling Storybirds

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/60633291/Storybirds Close Reading Activities: Google Forms

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/61085932/The%20Road%3A%20Close%20Reading%201

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/61085990/The%20Road%3A%20Close%20Reading%202 Summative Assessments Illuminated Passage Assignment:

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/61086491/The%20Road%20Illuminated%20Passage Student Samples: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1HlGlgcuRHmO3-Ej6vONCTovHN5uF-vVRSQlw2E6rwcc/edit

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LSgRIJPlo26dcDT1K2gIMNYreA5gYbpR2lpB_Zh8QIA/edit Assessments CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Shopping Cart Essay:
Filling the Cart: Task: Bring in an item tangible or intangible that the man and the boy use to help them survive in the post-apocalyptic world Cormac McCarthy creates in The Road.

For each item you must write on a note card the following pieces of information.
1. Your name

2. The quote the item appears in (tangible) or illustrated by (intangible).

3. An explanation of the how the item helps/hurts them on their journey.

4. The level of Maslow's Hierarchy the item fulfills with an explanation.

5. Bring the item and card to class and attach the card with a rubber band.

Your essay should be well-developed with thesis, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.
After a short introduction, the THESIS is your response to the prompt.

For the BODY PARAGRAPHS, you will need to use the quote attached to the item or additional quotes from the text. Each quote will need to be integrated using a stem sentence. Each quote should be properly cited (page #). Each item should be analyzed how it reveals Maslow’s Hierarchy at work within the novel. You may use more than one quote in each body paragraph.

The CONCLUSION should address (not repeat) your answer to the prompt by considering what other connections can be made to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs or what the reader of your essay should understand about reaching the highest levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy.

Your response will be graded on your
•Effective organization; Clear, focused
•Engaging with relevant, strong supporting evidence and details
•Creative and engaging intro and conclusion
•Variety of sentence structures; Exceptional vocabulary
•Correct integration of quote; citations
•Exceptionally strong control of standard conventions of writing

Maslow’s Hierarchy meets The Road
Essay Writing Prompt
Pixley English III CP

Directions:
The items in the shopping cart will be the means for you to reflect on whether or not the man and the boy reach the highest levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy. There are tangible (can, tarp, jar) and intangible which are represented by words (“fear” ”turmoil” “compassion”) You will be shopping for THREE (3)ITEMS from the shopping cart; at least ONE (1) of these items must be intangible.

PROMPT: Do the man and the boy reach the highest levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy? Common Core State Standards: Reading
Craft and Structure CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) Common Core State Standards: Writing
Text Types and Purposes
Common Core State Standards: Reading
Key Ideas and Details Common Core State Standards: Writing
Text Types and Purposes
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2b Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2c Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2d Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2e Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
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