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Dynamic Characters: Holling Hoodhood

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john dimock

on 18 January 2017

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Transcript of Dynamic Characters: Holling Hoodhood

Dynamic Characters:

Holling Hoodhood

From
The Wednesday Wars

Is there any hope for this guy?
Maybe.
This Holling kid is a real jerk.
Yep. He is. He even takes evidence that Mrs. Baker is pretty cool and somehow reads it as she's evil.
In the Beginning:
Holling is enormously self centered.
He's willing to let other people get hurt because of his delusion:


OK, but really:
The desk wasn't really trapped, and Doug's brother is a jerk, right?
For Example:
He genuinely seems to think the world revolves around him.

He thinks Mrs. Baker hates him and is out to get him. Really, Mrs. Baker has a lot bigger things on her mind than this poor little seventh-grader.

On page 22, the principal announces that Mrs. Baker's husband is heading to Vietnam. Holling doesn't seem to even notice this and assumes that her stoicism is about him! "Because that's how it is with people who are plotting something awful."

He manipulates Meryl Lee, getting her to open his desk for her.
He actually tells someone who "loves him" to open a trapped desk by telling her there is a surprise inside. Pretty crappy move, dude.
He gets her to do it because she "has been in love with him since she first laid eyes on [him] in the third grade" (11).


He trips Doug's brother, severely injuring him. The guy, who is your age, gets a concussion and has to be hospitalized for ten days.
(See pages 15 and 25)

That's no joke.
Well, but the fact is that Holling THOUGHT it was trapped. He really believed that it could have hurt him, so he tricked someone else into (unknowingly) taking that risk.

And, maybe Doug was ACTUALLY trying to get the ball into the goal. We only have Holling's word that he was going to hurt him, and considering this is the same kid who thinks his teacher put a hit out on him with the school bully, well, can we really take Holling's word for it?
He realizes she let him read a book with a bunch of curses in it. So, maybe she's a cool teacher. Not for Holling: "Whatever she was plotting, it was a whole lot more devious than I'd given her credit for" (55).
At the end of Chapter 3, Holling is there for the news that Mrs. Bigio's husband was killed in Vietnam.

"Mrs. Bigio opened her mouth, but the only sounds that came out were the sounds of sadness. I can't tell you what they sounded like. But you'll know them when you hear them" (71).
Maybe, just maybe, Holling has actually seen something from the perspective of another person.

Maybe he'll grow as a person and finally start realizing the people around him have real feelings and real lives that *gasp* don't revolve around him.

And so on
And so forth...
With examples...
And more pictures...
Always remembering...
to include text references with quotations and page numbers...
Until we're at the end of the book.
And we can't forget to wrap things up with a concluding statement that ties everything together.
Here, it would be a statement about how much Holling has changed, based on the evidence from the preceding slides.
And, you'd better include a work-cited, not just for the text you've quoted, but for all the images you've used.
Requirements:

This project needs to focus on one character from a novel you've read.
It needs to chart how the character grows, changes, and develops over the course of the novel.

20 Slides, minimum
15 Images
15 Clear, documented references to the text.
An introductory slide with your name, the character's name, and the book - punctuation counts.
A concluding slide that sums up the changes and makes a final assessment of the character.
An MLA formatted works-cited.

Full transcript