Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Cambodian Genocide

No description
by

Elizabeth Mekonnen

on 11 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Cambodian Genocide

by Elizabeth, Hamima and Jordan What was the Cambodian Genocide? How Did it Happen? Background KHMER ROUGE RULE "To spare you is no profit,
to destroy you is no loss."
Pol Pot's Ideology Prior to the Lol Nol government, Cambodia had remained neutral in the Vietnam War giving aid to both sides. But when Lol Nol took over, the U.S. felt free to move around Cambodia to continue their fight with the Viet Cong. Between 1970-1974, 750,000 Cambodians died by American B-52 bombers, using nalpalm and dart cluster bombs to destroy suspected Viet Cong targets in Cambodia. As a result of American bombardment and Lol Nol's collaboration with the U.S., pushed many Cambodians to Pol Pot's guerilla movement. Many Cambodians became disillusioned with Western democracy because of the many Cambodian lives lost during this war that the U.S. involved Cambodia in. Pol Pot's communism brought an image of hope, promise, and tranquility for all Cambodians. By 1975, there were over 700,000 men in his force. When the Khmer Rouge took over (1975), in only a couple of days, Pol Pot had instilled his extreme political ideas of collectivization, which is when the government confiscates and controls all property); and he also instilled communal labor. The CAMBODIAN GENOCIDE
(1975-1978) The Cambodian Genocide refers to the attempt of Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge party leader to nationalize and centralize the peasant farming society of Cambodia in a short period of time, according to the Chinese Communist agricultural precedent. As a result, 25% of the country’s population in three years was decimated, totaling in over 2 million deaths. The Cambodian genocide was caused directly by the Vietnam War. the Vietnamese war entered Cambodia when U.S. troops stormed surrounding nations, hunting down Vietnamese Communists. Pol Pot's Communist, Anti-American Khmer Rouge movement gain popularity as civilian death tolls rose from U.S. bombardment. Threatened by death, all Cambodians were forced out of their homes and villages to the collectivized farms and labor camps. The old, disabled, and sick who weren't able to make the journey were killed. People who refused to leave or opposed the ideals of the regime were killed as well. The people in the city were forced out to the countryside. All of their civil rights and political freedoms were stripped away; all the children were separated from their parents and put into a different labor camp. All private institutions including schools, hospitals, and factories were shut down with all their former employees and owners killed, including their family as well. Cambodians weren't allowed to practice any religion. Christian missionaries and Buddhist monks were murdered. Religious temples and churches were burned down. There were racist sentiments but it wasn't the reason behind the murdering but to promote their militant communist transformation. TARGETS The Cambodians who survived the purges and marches worked ceaseless as unpaid laborers for barely any rations. Their new so called 'homes' reflected the conditions of a military barrack. They suffered from food shortages and disease spread endlessly. Enduring brutal slave labor, starvation, injury, and disease many Cambodians weren't physically able to work and as result were killed by the Khmer Rouge. This lasted for about three years until Vietnam invaded and ousted the Pol Port's government in 1978. TREATMENT Christian missionaries, leading Buddhist monks, Cambodian children and families, private institution workers and employers along with their families. Virtually all Cambodians were targeted. LEADERS of the Cambodian Genocide The major leader of the Cambodian Genocide was Pol Pot, who was educated in France and was a huge admirer or "Mao" Chinese communism. He worked with his Khmer Rouge soldiers to instill his extremist dictatorial regime. "Pol Pot is considered to be one of the most evil political leaders in modern
history. Pol Pot." Vietnam War Reference Library. Vol. 2: Biographies Volume 2. Detroit: UXL, 2001. World History In Context. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. "Pol Pot is considered to be one of the most evil political leaders
in modern history. Pol Pot." Vietnam War Reference Library. Vol. 2: Biographies Volume 2. Detroit: UXL, 2001. World History In Context. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. "Cambodian Genocide." World WIthout
Genocide. 2012. William Mitchell College of Law. n.d. 6 March 2013. "Cambodian Genocide." World WIthout Genocide. 2012. William Mitchell College of Law. n.d. 6 March 2013. "Cambodian 'Killing Fields' Remains Found, 1999." Gale World History in
Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. World History In Context. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. "Cambodian Genocide." World WIthout
Genocide. 2012. William Mitchell College of Law. n.d. 6 March 2013. Cambodian troops dispassionately carry off the bodies of the dead. It has been estimated the Khmer..." Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity. Ed. Dinah L. Shelton. Vol. 2. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2005. World History In Context. Web. 6 Mar. 2013." INTERNATIONAL RESPONSE Links http://worldwithoutgenocide.org/genocides-and-conflicts/cambodian-genocide After international pressure and several year of debate, military tribunals became 2007 and ended 2010. After a mock trial in 1997, Pol Pot was declared guilty by Khmer Rouge members but sentence was carried out--he died a natural death the next year. A good overview on the background and circumstances of the genocide. a good place to being investigation of the genocide. http://cgp.research.yale.edu/cgp/cts/ctssearch.jsp A Yale photo database of the victims of the genocide. You can look up specific people by name, or general photos of victims age or gender. http://cybercambodia.com/dachs/stories.html Survivor stories of the Cambodian Genocide. The Digital Archive or Cambodia Holocaust Survivors (DACHS) also has many other useful resources on the tragedy.
Full transcript