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eng

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Jay Loehner

on 3 May 2010

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Transcript of eng

Ted Kooser By: Jay Loehner Who is Ted Kooser? 71 years old and has been writing since 1969
Won the Pulitzer Prize for his book of poems, Delights & Shadow in 2005
Kooser owned and operated Windflower Press which specialized in the publication of contemporary poetry. Windflower Press is now inactive
Well respected in poetry community and has worked for numerous publications
such as The New Yorker
United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress
from 2004 - 2006.
He has received several honorary doctorates from numerous colleges
Earned a BS at Iowa State University in 1962 and an MA
at the University of Nebraska in 1968. Kooser's Poetry Uses simple understandable language
Uses very descriptive language
Likes to stay away from figurative
language
Though simple, poems have
very deep meaning
Many poems deal with everyday
objects and everyday life
Heavily influenced by Mid-West
and his state of Nebraska
What Kooser Does Best The Poem We were ten or eleven, my friend and I,
when we found them up under a bridge,
on top of a beam where pigeons were resting.
Someone had carefully hidden them there.
On each was a black-and-white photo,
no two cards alike. We grew quiet and older,
young men on our haunches, staring at
what we feared might be the future.
The pigeons flapped back to their roosts,
rustling and cooing. The river gurgled
as it slipped from the bridge’s cool shadow.
There were women with big muzzled dogs,
women with bottles and broom handles.
Stallions stood over the bodies of others.
The women smiled and licked their lips
with tongues like thorns. We grew old.
We were two old men with stiff legs
and sad hearts. We had wanted to laugh
but we couldn’t. We had thought we were boys,
come there to throw stones at the pigeons,
but we were already dying inside.
A Deck of Pornographic Playing Cards By: Ted Kooser Shows the shift in attitude
and what Kooser thinks
growing up is like Kooser shows how he ultimatley feels about
life and his reaction to the experience Why I Chose Deck of
Cards The Connection Siegfried Sassoon VS. Ted Kooser We were ten or eleven, my friend and I,
when we found them up under a bridge,
on top of a beam where pigeons were resting.
Someone had carefully hidden them there.
On each was a black-and-white photo,
no two cards alike. We grew quiet and older,
young men on our haunches, staring at
what we feared might be the future.
The pigeons flapped back to their roosts,
rustling and cooing. The river gurgled
as it slipped from the bridge’s cool shadow.
There were women with big muzzled dogs,
women with bottles and broom handles.
Stallions stood over the bodies of others.
The women smiled and licked their lips
with tongues like thorns. We grew old.
We were two old men with stiff legs
and sad hearts. We had wanted to laugh
but we couldn’t. We had thought we were boys,
come there to throw stones at the pigeons,
but we were already dying inside.
Darkness: the rain sluiced down; the mire was deep;
It was past twelve on a mid-winter night,
When peaceful folk in beds lay snug asleep;
There, with much work to do before the light,
We lugged our clay-sucked boots as best we might
Along the trench; sometimes a bullet sang,
And droning shells burst with a hollow bang;
We were soaked, chilled and wretched, every one;
Darkness; the distant wink of a huge gun.

I turned in the black ditch, loathing the storm;
A rocket fizzed and burned with blanching flare,
And lit the face of what had been a form
Floundering in mirk. He stood before me there;
I say that He was Christ; stiff in the glare,
And leaning forward from His burdening task,
Both arms supporting it; His eyes on mine
Stared from the woeful head that seemed a mask
Of mortal pain in Hell's unholy shine.

No thorny crown, only a woollen cap
He wore--an English soldier, white and strong,
Who loved his time like any simple chap,
Good days of work and sport and homely song;
Now he has learned that nights are very long,
And dawn a watching of the windowed sky.
But to the end, unjudging, he'll endure
Horror and pain, not uncontent to die

That Lancaster on Lune may stand secure.
He faced me, reeling in his weariness,
Shouldering his load of planks, so hard to bear.
I say that He was Christ, who wrought to bless
All groping things with freedom bright as air,
And with His mercy washed and made them fair.
Then the flame sank, and all grew black as pitch,
While we began to struggle along the ditch;
And someone flung his burden in the muck,
Mumbling: 'O Christ Almighty, now I'm stuck!'



Similarities Differences Differences Sassoon Kooser My Poem Biography of Sassoon Born September 8, 1886

Born to an affluent family in England Enlisted as a soldier and fought
in World War I from 1915-1917 In 1917 left military and started
to protest the war In poetry tries to convey
the ugly truths of World War I Was among sixteen Great War poets
commemorated in
Westminster Abbey's Poet's Corner
Died September 1, 1967
The sun streams down,
as I sit in my lawn chair outside my house,
with a nice cold drink in my hand
listening and watching the planes land
at Beverly Airport.

Their engines screaming like banshees,
as the machines sail over the treetops like
boats on the ocean. Their noise slowly drowns out
as the pilot flies away out of sight
to land on the hot black tarmac.
that is the airport.
Like Kooser? One of few times Kooser uses figurative language Shows change in Kooser
and his new found maturity Coming of age story Easy to understand Entertaining Makes the reader think Interesting Summer By: Jay Loehner Comparison Talk about everyday occurrences Simple to understand and read Not much figurative language Describe something common Deals with World War I Main character is a young soldier Deals with life on the front line Reflects on old life before the war Takes place in 1917 Great Britain Both poems tell comming of age story Progression goes from young to old Loss of innocence Scared of the future Younger main character Main character happy and naive Takes place in different time period Main setting youth playing Works Cited Google Images TedKooser.net All Videos Made by Jay Loehner www.bbc.co.uk/history/Siegfried Sassoon
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