Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Positive Learning Environments: Assessment Two

Work in progress
by

Anthony Vassallo

on 27 June 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Positive Learning Environments: Assessment Two

Positive Learning Environments: Assessment Two

Anthony Vassallo, Daniella Karim & Daniel Babaic

SCENE ONE: Pre-production
SCENE TWO: Performance
SCENE Three: Post-production
Teaching is like the theatre; teachers are the actors, classrooms are the stage, lesson plans are the script and students are the audience. This presentation will look at different techniques, models and theories that are used to manage student behaviour, and will be divided into the three phases of production: pre-production, performance, and post- production. So let the show begin.
Prologue
Limitations
Advantages
Lights!
Camera!
Action!

• Prevention rather than cure.
• Law of requisite variety:
• 1st principle: creating a positive learning environment
• 2nd principle: engage your students
(Scannella, 2008)
• Collaborative/shared leadership style:
• Positives
• Negatives (Barnes & Toska, 2012)
• ‘Withitness’ (Kounin, 1970)
• BEPROACTIVE! (Mitchem, 2005)
• ABC -Antecedent, Behaviour, Consequences
(Lyons, Ford & Arthur-Kelly, 2011)
• Pace and predictability (Good & Brophy, 1994)
• Personal teaching model for managing behaviour.
(Charles & Senter, 2011) "A whole school approach"
Scene Four: Policy Analysis
Individual Reflection
My Journey - Daniella...
Individual Reflection
Group Reflection
Teachers establish a connection with students by showing understanding
Dreikur's 'Mistaken Goals': all misbehaviour reflects children's decision about how they can most effectively belong to, or be recognised by the group.
Doctor John W. Maag: “independant group-oriented contingency recognises the positive output of a single student of group of students to reinforce the entire class

What could go wrong?
What went well?
Student-Teacher struggle for power
Negative behaviour can influence a student to misbehave in class.
Student's social-emotional well-being is at stake in the classroom.
I''ve learnt behaviour management and student wellbeing is not....
I've learnt that behaviour management and student wellbeing is...
Promotes peer pressure, and sets expectations. If expectations cannot be met, student might show a negative attitude
The teacher is warm and welcoming, this creates a welcoming environment, and can assist in building in rapport.
Uses punishment and negative consequences to enforce limits.
This system of behaviour management is easy to implement.


Cooperation
Encouragement
Insight
Advice

Organisation
Dynamics
Environment
PLE
De Jong
Relationships
Wellbeing
Task-Orientated
Destructive
Collaboration
Communication
Kounin
Philosophy
Cohesion
Support
Full transcript