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245.15 Qal Perfect Weak Verbs II

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Andrew Perrin

on 16 November 2015

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Transcript of 245.15 Qal Perfect Weak Verbs II

Elementary
Biblical
Hebrew

Trinity Western University
Dr. Andrew Perrin
Qal Perfect
Weak Verbs II

Review of Weak Verb Diagnostic Hints:
I/II Gutturals & III Het/Ayin:
III Aleph
III Heh
Gutt. letters will take
Hateph-Patach
where we would have a Vocal Shewa in usual paradigm
3ms form will have vocalization
Qamets-Qamets
Aleph will "
quiesce
" in every form
Dagesh Lene disappears
in endings starting with Taw
3ms form will have vocalization
Qamets-Qamets
Heh will drop
out in all other forms
Hireq-yod
appears in place of Heh
Dagesh Lene disappears
in endings starting with Taw
The Qal Perfect
Weak Verb
Paradigm
(so far)

DOUBLE WEAK

GEMINATE

BICONSONANTAL

Verbs with a more than one guttural in their root.
Verbs with an identical
2nd and 3rd consonant in their root.
Verbs based on roots of two consonants.
Double weak verbs will reflect the patterns and variations occasioned by their two weak letters.
EXAMPLES
What features do we see in our double weak paradigm that we learned last day?
GEMINATE CHANGES:
The repeated consonant will
assimilate
in all 1st and 2nd person forms: represented by
Dagesh Forte

All 1st and 2nd person forms will feature a
Holem-Waw
to connect the root and verbal suffix
Geminate Verb Paradigms
Two patterns:
"Strong" (comprised of two hard consonants)
"Weak" (including a guttural consonant)
Changes to the paradigm:;
3ms/3cp forms will take
Qamets with biconsonantal root
1st/2nd person forms will have
Patach under first consonant
"Weak" biconsonantal
verbs will take
Qamets
through the whole paradigm
Dagesh Lene will disappear
in final Aleph biconsonantal verbs
Full transcript