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Copy of Candy Chromatography: What Makes Those Colors?

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by

Stephen Tee

on 1 January 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Candy Chromatography: What Makes Those Colors?

Brainstorm Results Research The Wonder of Candy (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr (cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr Question:
Color Chromatography: What Makes Those Colors? Hypothesis:
I hypothesize that chromatography can tell whether the same chemical was used to dye two different kinds of candies of the same color. If they share a common reaction then the same kind of dye was used. However if the reaction is different then a different kind of dye was used. To do this experiment you will need the following materials and equipment:
Candy with a colored coating, like M&Ms®
At least 30 strips of paper
All strips must be exactly the same size.
3 cm x9 cm is a good size, but you can change this to fit your needs.
You can use white cone-type coffee filters cut into strips, or you can use chromatography paper.
Wide-mouth jar
Pencil
Ruler
Tape
Salt
Water
Toothpicks
Food coloring (red, green, and blue) Experimental Procedure
1. I used a pencil to lightly label which candy color or food coloring would be spotted on each paper strip.
2. Then, I drew a pencil line 2 cm from the edge of each strip of paper.
a. That was the origin line.
b. I spotted the candy color for each strip right on this line.
3. Next I needed to extract some dye from each candy I wished to test.
(I Set the candy down on a clean plate in a single drop of water. Note: If you use too much water, the dye will not be concentrated enough to see on the chromatography paper.)
A. I left it for a minute to allow the dye to dissolve.
B. I removed the candy, then dipped a clean toothpick into the now- colored drop of water.
C. I spotted the candy dye solution onto the chromatography paper by touching the toothpick to the chromatography strip, right in the center of the origin line.
D. Then, I allowed the spot to dry, then repeated the spotting at least three more times. I wanted to make sure to have enough dye on the chromatography paper so that I could see the dye components when they separated out on the paper.
E. Then I made five separate strips for each candy I wanted to test. 5. I repeated step 4 for each color of candy I wanted to test (at least three different colors).
6. Then, I also needed to prepare chromatography strips with food coloring dyes.
A. These were my known compounds, with which I compared the "unknown" candy dyes.
B. For each food coloring color, I used the same procedure as in step 4. I used a drop of food coloring as the source for dipping the clean toothpick.
7. I prepared a 0.1% salt solution for the chromatography solvent.
a I added 1/8 teaspoon of salt to 3 cups of water (1 g of salt to 1 L of water).
b I shook or stirred until the salt was completely dissolved.
8. I poured a small amount of the salt solution into the wide-mouth jar.
a. I taped the strip to a pencil and rested the pencil on top of the jar so that the strip hung into the jar.
b. My goal was to have the end of the chromatography strip just touching the surface of the solvent solution.
9. I let the solvent rise up the strip (by capillary action) until it was almost at the top, then I removed the strip from the solvent. I kept a close eye on the strip and the solvent front—(if you let it run too long the dye may run off the paper and become distorted.)
10. I used a pencil to mark how far the solvent rose.
11. I allowed the strip to dry, then measured the Rf value for each candy color (or food coloring) dye component.
12. I used the five repeated strips for each candy color (or food coloring), to calculate the average Rf for each dye component.
12. I compared the Rf values for the candy colors and the food coloring dyes. (Can you identify which food coloring dyes match which candy colors?) Result:
My Hypothesis was true that chromatography can tell whether the same chemical was used to dye two different kinds of candies of the same color. If they share a common reaction then the same kind of dye was used. However if the reaction is different then a different kind of dye was used.

Food Coloring:
Red: Started at 2cm 4 1/2cm

Blue: Started at 2cm- 4 1/2cm


Green: Started at 2cm- 4 1/2cm

Candy (M&M’s):

Red: Started at 2cm- 3 1/2cm

Blue: Started at 2cm-4 1/2cm

Green: Started at 2cm- 4 1/2cm Defined key vocabulary in your experiment:
Color Chromatography- a method of analysis - of separating and comparing dyes used in candies and food coloring Why is this experiment relevant
to your life?
Well, I like candy so I like to learn new things about candy,especially because during this experiment I got to eat some candy. Candy with a colored coating, like Skittles® or M&Ms®
At least 30 strips of paper
All strips must be exactly the same size.
3 cm 9 cm is a good size, but you can change this to fit your needs.
You can use white cone-type coffee filters cut into strips, or you can use chromatography paper.
Wide-mouth jar
Pencil
Ruler
Tape
Salt
Water
Toothpicks
Food coloring (red, green, and blue) Controls/Constants Constants Cup, Pencil Controls Different types of candy with same color Red Blue 4 1/2 cm 2cm 4 1/2cm 2cm 5+7= (cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr Before Water After Water (5 minutes) Green 2 cm 4 1/2cm Independent Variable- Different Candies Dependent Variable- The amount of Water Acknowledgments- I want to thank my mother for helping me construct my experiment.
I would also like to thank Mrs. Kahanna for giving me the chance to do this experiment, it was a lot of fun and I learned a lot. After Water (5 Minutes) Blue Red 2 cm 2 cm 5+7= (cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr Candy- M&M'S Food Coloring Before Water Green 2 cm 4 1/2cm 3 1/2 cm 4 1/2 cm Definitions . Constants- A quality that does not change its value regardless of the value of the variable
Controls- a person, group, event, etc., that is used as a constant and unchanging standard of comparison in scientific experimentation. This is used to compare a dependent variable to an independent variable Bibliography- http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/FoodSci_p006.shtml THE END
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