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Education is at a crossroads. Something's on the line.

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by

Jacob Ramirez

on 16 September 2015

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Transcript of Education is at a crossroads. Something's on the line.

So we talked.
About
re-envisioned
education.
Jacob and Paul
http://www.theemotionmachine.com/5-lessons-i-learned-in-school-and-now-want-to-forget
Education is at a crossroads.
Something's on the line.
We know pop culture
is high interest.
And, students
need high
interest texts.
Why not use pop culture to connect?
Kids are ready
to learn through
pop culture.
Can Pop Culture and Comics Fuel Education?
Kindergarten Text:

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus
by Mo Willems
Grade 1 Text
Children Make Terrible Pets
by Peter Brown
Grade 2 Text
Disney's Ultra Heroes
Grade 3 Text
2030: A Day in the Life
of Tomorrow's Kids
By Amy Zuckerman
6th Grade Text
Smile
By Raina Telgemeier
Persepolis
By Marjane Satrapi
11th -12th Grade Text
Kindergarten
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.7
With prompting and support,
describe
the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
Grade 1
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.7
Use illustrations and details in a story to
describe
its characters, setting, or events.
Grade 2
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.5

Describe
the overall structure of a story, including
describing
how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.
Grade 2
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.7
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to
demonstrate
understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
Grade 3
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1

Ask
and
answer
questions to
demonstrate
understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Grade 3
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.5

Refer
to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when
writing
or
speaking
about a text,
using
terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza;
describe
how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
Grade 3
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.7

Explain
how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)
•Fast-Forward...
Let's see how comics and graphic novels could easily and naturally fit into the curriculum to facilitate the skill development expressed in these Grade 6 standards, and even high school standards...
Grade 6
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.4

Determine
the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings;
analyze
the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone
Grade 6
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.5

Analyze
how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
Grade 6
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.6

Explain
how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
Grade 6
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.7

Compare and contrast
the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.
Grade 6
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.9

Compare and contrast
texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.
Grade 11-12
:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1

Cite
strong and thorough textual evidence to
support
analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Grade 11-12
:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2

Determine
two or more themes or central ideas of a text and
analyze
their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
"
Sequence
" in sequential art, is among the many
skills
that
comics scholars have pointed to
, but that those of us in
education

have considered
in terms of
emergent literacy skills
.
Panel-to-panel

and
page-to-page

transitions

are

perfect spaces

for building the

predicting

and
summarizing skills

in early childhood education, and exampled in the following standards from
kindergarten through Grade 12
.
So here's what we know...

I just bought this t-shirt...
Swag.
Maybe that kid didn't know I designed that shirt or that poster he's studying in his government class.
That kid's also reading "Animal Farm" in
his English class,
nice cover Shep...
That kid's teacher can't see that pop culture
will
connect. That kid's dying to discuss this cover...
That kid and others deserve a text that serves their learning purposes, but reads and feels like beautiful and timeless art fit for deep critical thinking.
Pa, can I have a text that does that?
IMAGINE

if we provided students with fresh (e)texts that renewed the traditional academic canon in a way that sought to:
-
ATTRACT
students through beautiful, high interest art
-
DEMAND
students develop multiple literacies
-
ENGAGE
students to think critically
-
CONNECT
humanities and sciences
-
EXCITE
students to learn
-
INVITE
students to inquire
So, what's available to download?
No Child Left Behind

and
Where we've been...
Where's Education Going?
What's the adoption rate for the
National Common Core Standards?
How FAST are we moving?
http://blogs.slj.com/goodcomicsforkids/2012/11/01/common-core-comics/
"Benjamin Bear"
vs.
Print Text Comics
http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy
Now, a closer look at the
Common Core
Standards...
Now, a closer look at Common Core Standards
1.) National Common Core Standards equalize education
2.) Comics and pop culture meet the standards (We've seen exemplary texts)
3.) Comics and graphic novels exist that can be used now...
Here are some
key
questions
1.) Will "Millenials" find curriculum intriguing that's based on comics and pop culture?
2.) How can comics and pop culture
revolutionize
education for students?
So, now what?
Let's start here with an average teenager.
So, if I'm a 21st century educator, I know that I have a
wide array
of
tools
with which to reach students,
including comics
...
Let's think fresh
Possibilities
...
We have Comics
We have progressive curriculum online
We have Pop Culture
Could we
merge
these learning
tools
and
fuel
a new and
revolutionary
way of
teaching
?
We have mobile technology (key)
We have social media and applications
We have traditional texts with illustrations
We have Graphic Novels
Now, let's shift from what's available to what's
possible
...
What
tools
do we have?
We have traditional fiction and non-fiction
Will
merging
these educational tools hold
promising possibilities
?

Dr. Heather K. Sheridan-Thomas, co-author of
The Best Practices in Adolescent Reading Instruction


wrote that "
connecting with adolescents' multiple literacies, including digital texts and high interest print-based texts, holds promise as a way to build bridges to subject area content and academic literacies
."
Justin Giampaoli
Freelance DC/Vertigo writer, editor and critic wrote, "
There's just so many angles you can attack education in comics from, from the work addressing socially relevant topics, to the tertiary information delivery system that occurs when you marry images and text and how Millenials and beyond are learning in different ways that necessitate more interactivity [...]
"
http://thirteenminutes.blogspot.com
@thirteenminutes
Possibility?
Could educators use an E-text based on Batman for multiple subjects that advance multiple literacy forms?

1.)
A graphic story
(Art)
2.)
Vocabulary rich text
(English Language Arts)
3.)
Physics application
and problems based on Bat gadgets (Physics)
4.)
Linked Videos
of Batman films / cartoons to prompt questions (ELA)
5.)
Critical thinking
about Batman's duty to protect versus personal happiness
(Theory of Knowledge -- International Baccalaureate)
Here's an example of what is
possible
...
Then, perhaps...
1.)
Describe
the conflicts between (A) Batman and the Joker, then (B) Batman and Nightwing.

2.) Which conflict is more problematic long term for Batman?
Reference
using cited graphic text.

3.) If Nightwing is willing to assume Batman's role as protector of Gotham City, should Batman retire?
Create
a 3 panel comic explaining a potential conversation between the two.


After you
watch
the linked clip -
analyze
the equation and
answer
while supporting evidence.
1.) How would you
characterize
Batman? Use the film clip to
justify
your answer.
2.) Is the jump that Batman performs possible to survive,
support
using the physics formulas provided.
Could you imagine the power of "
grafting
" comics, technology, humanities, sciences and critical thinking into a
next generation learning medium
?
I'm hooked
on homework.
COMICS?
Here are some texts that could be adopted into classrooms, some already are...
lkj
jk
Let's consider
two
perspectives...
Educational
Perspective
Comics
Perspective
Educational
Perspective
Comics
Perspective
So, now that we know there's
promise
...
What about
possibilities
?
While these texts are beautifully crafted, one must ask "
are they designed and crafted specifically for a classroom?
"

Typically, classroom
textbooks
are treated as
disposable
after re-printings. They're treated as anything but classic or timeless pieces of work -- they're
tools that expire
.

Is it time that we started designing curriculum with the intent of making it engaging, beautiful and timeless?
Education as timeless art?
Possibility?
Could educators use an E-text based on Harper Lee's classic novel
To Kill a Mockingbird
while linking it with a graphic novel and US History, or even more?

1.)

A graphic story

(Art)
2.)

Vocabulary rich text

(English Language Arts)
3.)
Historical texts

(History / Social Sciences)
4.)
Linked Videos

to classic tales (Film)
5.)

Critical thinking

about (Theory of Knowledge)

"The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience."

from Chapter 11
“Any person . . . presenting for public acceptance or general information, arguments or suggestions in favor of social equality or of intermarriage between whites and negroes, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars or imprisonment not exceeding six months or both fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the court.”—Mississippi, 1920

“Any white woman who shall suffer or permit herself to be got with child by a negro or mulatto . . . shall be sentenced to the penitentiary for not less than eighteen months.”—Maryland, 1924
Evaluate
the graphic, quote, movie trailer and Jim Crow Laws below -- then answer the below questions using cited evidence to support.

1.) Does the graphic appropriately match Atticus' quote?
Explain
.
2.)
Re-examine
Atticus' quote and the Jim Crow Laws below. How might Atticus comment on each of these laws.
Support
your view.
3.)
Evaulate
the trailer below. How does a child's point of view play a role in defeating Jim Crow Laws?
Quote
the trailer to answer.
"The one thing that doesn't abide by majority is a person's conscience." -Atticus Finch
Examples of High Interest Texts Meeting
National Common Core Standards
Now, let's
examine
a
freshly

re-envisioned
approach to the canon.
Refresh
Rethink
Recreate
Education

"The Common Core Standards are designed to build upon the most advanced current thinking about preparing all students for success in college and their careers" -- Corestandards.org

We believe that comics and pop culture will powerfully refresh student interest in education.

We believe that comics and pop culture will help us rethink pedagogical approaches to teaching by linking content in boldly interactive ways.

We believe that comics and pop culture will help recreate the curriculum and canon so that it's timeless, beautiful and educational.





Our Summary and Vision

Where to start? Suggested Comics and Graphic Novels (Compiled by Justin Giampaoli)
The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation
by Sid Jacobson & Ernie Colon

Alan’s War
by Emmanuel Guibert

American Born Chinese
by Gene Luen Yang (assimilation of first generation Americans)

Barnum! In Secret Service to the USA
by Howard Chaykin, David Tischman, Niko Henrichon

Berlin: City of Stones
by Jason Lutes

The Death of Elijah Lovejoy
by Noah Van Sciver

Deogratias: A Tale of Rwanda
by Stassen (Tutsi genocide in Rwanda)

Fax From Sarajevo
by Joe Kubert (real world account of fax messages to the author during genocidal war in Bosnia)

Five Fists of Science
by Matt Fraction & Steven Sanders (raucous fictional account of exploits of Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, and JP Morgan)

The Golem’s Might Swing
by James Sturm (Jewish baseball team during 1920’s, anti-semitism)

It Was The War of The Trenches
by Jacques Tardi (WWI autobiography)

Habibi
by Craig Thompson (sprawling love story that touches on child slavery, gender politics, common heritage of Christianity and Islam, cultural divide between first and third worlds, etc.)

How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less
by Sarah Glidden (memoir of author’s trip to Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Golan Heights, Masada, et.)

The Hypo
by Noah Van Sciver (Pre-Presidential Abe Lincoln)

In the Shadow of No Towers
by Art Spiegelman (reflections on 9/11)

Jerusalem: A Family Portrait
by Boaz Yakin & Nick Bertozzi (follows three generations of one family living in Palestine through chaos, war, etc. during 1940’s)

Journey Into Mohawk Country
by George O’Connor (account of Harmen Meyndertsz van den Bogaert’s fur trade journey through New York State.

Laika
by Nick Abadzis (Soviet space program)

Lewis & Clark
by Nick Bertozzi (about their expedition)

Marathon
by Boaz Yakin and Joe Infurnari (Greek history, basis for Olympic Games)

The Massive
by Brian Wood, Kristian Donaldson, Garry Brown (environmental sustainability, economic collapse, globalization of culture)

Moving Pictures
by Kathryn Immonen and Stuart Immonen (Nazis looting art from France during WWII)

Nat Turner
by Kyle Baker (1831 Virginia slave rebellion)

Notes For A War Story
by Gipi (socialization of gun violence, organized crime, war in the Balkans)

Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow
by James Sturm (account of the pivotal pitcher in negro leagues)

Stuck Rubber Baby
by Howard Cruse (racial and homosexual prejudice)

Safe Area Gorazde or Palestine
by Joe Sacco (journalist chronicling travels and interviews via comics regarding Bosnian War and various Middle East conflicts)

The Silence of Our Friends
by Mark Long, Jim Demonakos, Nate Powell (60’s civil rights movement)

Think Tank
by Matt Hawkins & Rahsan Ekedal (application of science and technology to military application and subsequent ethical concerns that arise)

Unknown Soldier
by Joshua Dysart & Alberto Ponticelli (Ugandan Civil War, Central African conflicts)

Vietnamerica
by GB Tran (Vietnamese-American whose family fled during the Fall of Saigon)

Presenters
Dr. Paul Crutcher
Professor of Literature and Education
University of Arkansas, Little Rock
E-mail: pacrutcher@ualr.edu





Jacob Ramirez
English Language Arts Teacher
GEMS American Academy, Abu Dhabi
E-mail: j.ramirez_gaa@gemsedu.com
Twitter: @Busy_Teacher
Addressing the Common Core Through Comics,
from Global Competencies to Skills Across the Subjects and Curriculum

Dr. Paul Crutcher
Jacob Ramirez
Full transcript