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"The Tyger" by William Blake

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by

Sanjana Ahuja

on 5 January 2015

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Transcript of "The Tyger" by William Blake

How to
comprehend
a poem:

SOAPSTONE
S
peaker:The speaker is an 18th century English poet and artist.

O
ccasion: Written for Blake's collection called "Songs of Experience".

A
udience: The targeted audience was the Christian Church at the time.

P
urpose: To depict a contrast between God's creations between the good and the evil. "The tyger" depicts a tiger which was terrorfying and the complete polar opposite of the innocent "the lamb". "The tyger" was written to show how completely opposite things were created by the same hands.

Tone:
Astonishing and questioning
William Blake
William Blake was born in London in 1757.
Blake claimed to have visions where he could see God and angels.
Blake was a nonconformist who associated with some of the leading radical thinkers of his day, such as Thomas Paine.
"The Tyger" was Published in 1794 as part of his collection Songs of Experience and a sequel to his songs of innocence in which "the lamb was introduced".
Blake makes a contrast between the gentle, innocent lamb and the terrifying and "evil" tyger, to highlight the prevailing contradictory ideas about the natural world.
Blake used to "the Tyger" to pose questions against God and his creations.
Paraphrase:
Tiger Tiger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal person or force,
Made you extreme symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies.
Were you created?
On what wings dare the tiger soar?
What hand dare stop the fire?

And what shoulder, and what form,
Could twist the nerves/tendons of your heart?
And when your heart began to beat,
What dread hand? and what dread feet?

Poet uses apostrophe when addressing the tiger, "Did he who make the lamb make you?"
"The Tyger"
"The Tyger" by William Blake depicts vivid imagery by the usage of repetition, alliteration, anaphora and artistically uses tone to signify astonishment of creations by the creator and the theme of the existence of evil.
by William Blake
Presented by:
Sanjana Ahuja &
Katherine Yu
Annotation and Glossary!
"The Tyger"
by: William Blake
yellow=repetition
green-alliteration
blue=anaphora
pink-metaphor
brown=personification
Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?
And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?
What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp,
Dare its deadly terrors clasp!
When the stars threw down their spears
And water'd heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?
Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?
"sinews"
is a tough tissue connecting certain parts to the heart.
anvil
is a horseshoer or a plover.
deeps/ skies
reference to hell/ heaven
immortal
means supernatural or one that will never die.
1] This poem makes me feel...
more appreciative of the tiger's beauty.
2] I think this poem is about...
God and his unique creations
such as the fearful tiger.
3] I think the speaker,
in the beginning of the poem sounds in "awe" of the tyger but later the tone shifts to ironic questioning.

What the hammer? what the chain,
In what oil burning heater was your brain?
What the plover? what fearful grasp,
Dare its deadly terrors hold!

When the stars threw down their spears
And watered heaven with their tears:
Did God/force that made the tiger smile when he saw his work?
Did the same person who made the lamb make you?

Tiger Tiger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal person or force,
Dare to frame your fearful symmetry?

Tyger Tyger,

burning bright,

In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could
frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what
distant deeps
or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?
What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil?
what dread grasp,
Dare its deadly
terrors clasp!

When the
stars threw down their spears

And water'd heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger Tyger

burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare
frame thy fearful symmetry?
WHO?

WHERE?
HOW?
WHAT DID HE USE?
WHO DARES?
Did you picture this?
Or this?
RIPP IT!




Repetition:
-"Tyger Tyger"
- Image of light, firey, burning.
-Series of questioning.
-Indirectly referencing to God, "he".
-First and Last stanza are almost the same
-A lot of human qualities: "hand, eye, brain, tears, heart, shoulder"

Isolation:
-The tyger because it is "framed" and the creator.
-Usage of one exclaimation mark to make it pop out




Position:
-1st and last stanza, same thing except 1st uses "could" and last one uses "dare"

Proportion:
-Used 13 questions and one complete sentence.
-Quatrain, six stanzas

Works Cited:

Blake, William. "Poetry Out Loud." Poetry Out Loud. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2014.
"The Disappearance of Rosemary Tonks." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2014.
"Everybody Means Something." Everybody Means Something. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.

"Gallery For Fierce Tiger Pictures." Gallery For Fierce Tiger Pictures. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

Newman, Bob. "Stanzas." Guide to Verse Forms. N.p., 4 Jan. 2013. Web. 13 Dec. 2014.

"Tyger Tyger, Burning Bright." Tyger Tyger, Burning Bright. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2014.

Full transcript