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Untitled Prezi

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by

Steven Biles

on 23 January 2013

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Transcript of Untitled Prezi

Scenic Painting:
The crowning touch
Creates character in the set

2 Main Areas:
1.Materials
2.Techniques Repair Holes
Patch on the BACK of the flat

Applying Dutchmen
4-6 inch wide strips of muslin to cover joints between flats
Compound – ¾ water to ¼ glue

Flame proofing
All scenery must be flame proofed
Compound – 1 lb borax, 1 lb sal ammoniac, ½ pt vinegar, 1 g hot water

Horizontal and Vertical painting
Prepare the paint space for whichever method will be used
Horizontal – large amounts of clean floor space
Vertical – large amounts of wall space and more care from the painters Preparing Scenery for Painting Sponges – Use for texture and for creating several different paint treatments

Rollers – Use with water-base paints to get large amounts of coverage

Aerosol Spray Can – Allows for some control of paint – often used to distress objects due to look of paint once sprayed

Spray Gun – Variety of methods use these – Drops to furniture can be painted with these
**Useful for applying glaze coats, fire retardants, spattering Other types of applicators Good brushes are expensive – but worth it!
Natural bristles are best
– Look for length and a natural springiness when wet

3 types of brushes

Priming – applies 1st coat – large (6 to 7 inches wide)
Lay-in – applies base coat – medium (4 to 5 inches wide)
Detail – Used for fine work – small (1/4 to 2 inches wide) Brushes Transparent finish coating made of resinous material
(lac – insect secretion) suspended in alcohol

Extremely volatile substance – needs to be handled carefully

Often used as a vehicle for bronzing powders

Lacquer – Form of shellac or varnish that has been diluted with alcohol or other quick-drying solvents Shellac Water-based paint with a binder based in soy protein or milk
Comes in a concentrate that can be thinned with water
Easily mixed
Has excellent covering properties
Matte finish
Water repellent when dry

Negatives:

Spoils quickly when opened – and smells like super-sour milk
Smell remains once dried!!! Casein Paint Safety Note

Dry pigment & binders…

Sometimes chemicals in paint
are highly toxic!!!

When in dry form, they are easy to inhale

Consult MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) to know how to handle certain materials!!! Texturing – Use of additives in paint to give depth and texture

Stenciling – Large cut patterns used to apply paint in detailed, intricate patterns like wallpaper

Front-Back Painting – a.k.a. translucent painting – Paint / Light the back AND the front of a muslin drop

Glazing – Applying a clear top coat to an existing finish

Metallic Finishes – Generates the illusion of metal or provides accent

Wallpapering – Alternative to painting – costly and should be done on hard flats Specialized Finishing Techniques Spattering
Stippling
Dry Brushing
Lining Standard Texture Coats Charcoal & Chalk – Used to draw parts of the design before painting

Handle extender – Allows painters to reach inaccessible areas with ease (Often made of bamboo)

Bucket

Straightedge – Guide to painting straight lines / beveled underside to prevent paint from ‘creeping’

Chalk Line – a.k.a. snap line – Aids in creating lines

Paint Cart – Convenient to carry paints

Electric glue pot – essential for creating size water

Immersion heater – Helpful for mixing and heating water, paint, dye, etc.

Stirrers Auxiliary Scene-Painting Tools Applicators An opaque paint with an oil, lacquer, or synthetic base
Hard surface
Excellent covering power
Smooth satin or gloss finish

Surface to be covered should have an enamel undercoat for proper sealing and finished look Enamel Transparent coating made of synthetic or natural resinous materials suspended in oil (oil varnish), alcohol (spirit varnish), or synthetic vehicle (polyurethane, vinyl acrylic)
Sealing coat
Matte, satin, glossy finish

Polyurethane believed to be better for stage – easier to apply and dries more quickly than other types Varnish Often carcinogenic & toxic – Safety 1st when using these!!!
Powder form
Transparent, brilliant, saturated dyes when mixed with water
1 tsp dye to 1 qt boiling water as average mix

Paint scrims & muslin drops & cycs
Tint water-based scene paints

Dye tends to bleed / spread – needs a binder
Add starch / white flex glue / animal glue size / clear vinyl acrylic base as binder Aniline Dye Water-based paint with a vinyl acrylic binder
Excellent adhesion
Extremely flexible
Suitable for painting wood, fabric, & most metals and plastics
Water-resistant

Can create a glaze (transparent wash) by diluting this type of paint with 8 to 10 parts water Vinyl Acrylic Paint Latex = Synthetic liquid plastic with flexible qualities
White latex is used as a base to mix tints with more saturated colors
Can use dry pigment / aniline dyes / casein / vinyl acrylic concentrates to tint latex
Matte finish
Adheres to wood and fabric well
Cleans up easily in water
Is cheap and easy to find Latex Paint **most scenic paints are water-vehicle paints – nonflammable / less expensive / easier to mix /
quicker to dry / lighter in weight / easier to clean 4 Elements of Paint

1. Pigment – Material that imparts color to a paint or dye
2. Filler – Material that creates opacity in paint
3. Vehicle – Liquid medium – water, oil, lacquer, and the like – in which pigments, fillers, and binders are suspended to create a pain mixture; after the paint is applied, the vehicle evaporates
4. Binder – The adhesive that bonds the pigment and filler together Scenic Paints Dry Brushing

Painting with a brush that holds very little paint

Tip of brush is dipped in paint, scraped across the lip of the bucket, then dragged across the surface of the work

Most commonly used to create wood grain Standard Texture Coats Spattering

Process of applying small drops of paint to a surface

Age the paint job, alter the hue, smooth out irregularities of base coat

Can be done by hand or with a garden sprayer

(Hudson is the brand preferred by many professional scenic artists) Standard Texture Coats In scale a 1’ sq grid is drawn on the elevation

In full-scale, 1’ sq grid is placed on the surface

Painter makes transfer of information using grid for placement Grid Transfer Oldest form of scene paint
Pigment and filler are pre-mixed and kept in dry form (powder)
Requires size water to create the paint…

Size water – A mixture of one cup hot animal glue and one tablespoon of Lysol per gallon of warm water (white glue can be substituted)

Comes in wide range of colors (See Table 10.1 – pg. 250)
Relatively inexpensive & stores indefinitely
Going ‘out of style’

Size water will spoil!!! – Throw it away!!!
Don’t use spoiled paint!!! Dry Pigment and Binder Temporary drop stretcher Drops must be stretched and framed before being painted

Horizontal vs. Vertical – once stretched this is the orientation painting will occur in

If being painted horizontal – may require bogus paper to absorb excess paint

If no existing frame, one will need to be built Drop Painting Techniques = Light
= Pigment Scene Painter’s Palette Vertical Painting Structures… Lining

Painting narrow, straight lines of varying widths – creates the appearance of depth

Uses highlight and shadow to ‘trick’ the eye Standard Texture Coats Applicators Paints Materials With a feather duster With a sponge With a brush Stippling

Applies a heavier texture than spattering to the scenery

Uses an applicator loaded with paint in a random pattern Standard Texture Coats
Application here is being done in a cross-hatch pattern working from the top down in a vertical painting situation Smooth Base Coat

Vertical – paint top down
Horizontal – paint corner out

Keep brush fully loaded with paint

Keep a wet edge

Don’t scrub surface with brush

Dry pigment & binder – apply with a cross-hatch pattern to avoid brush marks Painting Techniques Auxiliary Scene-Painting Tools
Look at the images from top to bottom to see the stages of creating a graded base coat Graded Base Coat

One that generally changes hue or value over the height or width of the painted surface.

Common to ‘fake’ a sense of age or being well-worn

Requires speed – blend must be done while paint is wet – small areas at a time Painting Techniques 4 3 2 1
1.Sharply textured, high-contrast curvilinear

2.Softly textured, low-contrast curvilinear

3.High-contrast linear scumble

4.Low-contrast linear scumble Scumbling

Blends several hues together – creates illusion of texture

Two guidelines –

Use a separate brush for each color to maintain integrity
Work rapidly – paints must be wet for blending to take place

Textures – rough plaster / wood / stone / dirt / etc. Painting Techniques Marble Stone Wood Foliage Applications of Painting Techniques An opaque paint with an oil, lacquer, or synthetic base
Hard surface
Excellent covering power
Smooth satin or gloss finish

Surface to be covered should have an enamel undercoat for proper sealing and finished look Enamel Transparent coating made of synthetic or natural resinous materials suspended in oil (oil varnish), alcohol (spirit varnish), or synthetic vehicle (polyurethane, vinyl acrylic)
Sealing coat
Matte, satin, glossy finish

Polyurethane believed to be better for stage – easier to apply and dries more quickly than other types Varnish Safety Note

Dry pigment & binders…

Sometimes chemicals in paint
are highly toxic!!!

When in dry form, they are easy to inhale

Consult MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) to know how to handle certain materials!!! Scenic Painting:
The crowning touch
Creates character in the set

2 Main Areas:
1.Materials
2.Techniques Dry Brushing

Painting with a brush that holds very little paint

Tip of brush is dipped in paint, scraped across the lip of the bucket, then dragged across the surface of the work

Most commonly used to create wood grain Standard Texture Coats Spattering
Stippling
Dry Brushing
Lining Standard Texture Coats Repair Holes
Patch on the BACK of the flat

Applying Dutchmen
4-6 inch wide strips of muslin to cover joints between flats
Compound – ¾ water to ¼ glue

Flame proofing
All scenery must be flame proofed
Compound – 1 lb borax, 1 lb sal ammoniac, ½ pt vinegar, 1 g hot water

Horizontal and Vertical painting
Prepare the paint space for whichever method will be used
Horizontal – large amounts of clean floor space
Vertical – large amounts of wall space and more care from the painters Preparing Scenery for Painting Charcoal & Chalk – Used to draw parts of the design before painting

Handle extender – Allows painters to reach inaccessible areas with ease (Often made of bamboo)

Bucket

Straightedge – Guide to painting straight lines / beveled underside to prevent paint from ‘creeping’

Chalk Line – a.k.a. snap line – Aids in creating lines

Paint Cart – Convenient to carry paints

Electric glue pot – essential for creating size water

Immersion heater – Helpful for mixing and heating water, paint, dye, etc.

Stirrers Auxiliary Scene-Painting Tools Sponges – Use for texture and for creating several different paint treatments

Rollers – Use with water-base paints to get large amounts of coverage

Aerosol Spray Can – Allows for some control of paint – often used to distress objects due to look of paint once sprayed

Spray Gun – Variety of methods use these – Drops to furniture can be painted with these
**Useful for applying glaze coats, fire retardants, spattering Other types of applicators Good brushes are expensive – but worth it!
Natural bristles are best
– Look for length and a natural springiness when wet

3 types of brushes

Priming – applies 1st coat – large (6 to 7 inches wide)
Lay-in – applies base coat – medium (4 to 5 inches wide)
Detail – Used for fine work – small (1/4 to 2 inches wide) Brushes Applicators Transparent finish coating made of resinous material
(lac – insect secretion) suspended in alcohol

Extremely volatile substance – needs to be handled carefully

Often used as a vehicle for bronzing powders

Lacquer – Form of shellac or varnish that has been diluted with alcohol or other quick-drying solvents Shellac Often carcinogenic & toxic – Safety 1st when using these!!!
Powder form
Transparent, brilliant, saturated dyes when mixed with water
1 tsp dye to 1 qt boiling water as average mix

Paint scrims & muslin drops & cycs
Tint water-based scene paints

Dye tends to bleed / spread – needs a binder
Add starch / white flex glue / animal glue size / clear vinyl acrylic base as binder Aniline Dye Water-based paint with a vinyl acrylic binder
Excellent adhesion
Extremely flexible
Suitable for painting wood, fabric, & most metals and plastics
Water-resistant

Can create a glaze (transparent wash) by diluting this type of paint with 8 to 10 parts water Vinyl Acrylic Paint Latex = Synthetic liquid plastic with flexible qualities
White latex is used as a base to mix tints with more saturated colors
Can use dry pigment / aniline dyes / casein / vinyl acrylic concentrates to tint latex
Matte finish
Adheres to wood and fabric well
Cleans up easily in water
Is cheap and easy to find Latex Paint Water-based paint with a binder based in soy protein or milk
Comes in a concentrate that can be thinned with water
Easily mixed
Has excellent covering properties
Matte finish
Water repellent when dry

Negatives:

Spoils quickly when opened – and smells like super-sour milk
Smell remains once dried!!! Casein Paint Texturing – Use of additives in paint to give depth and texture

Stenciling – Large cut patterns used to apply paint in detailed, intricate patterns like wallpaper

Front-Back Painting – a.k.a. translucent painting – Paint / Light the back AND the front of a muslin drop

Glazing – Applying a clear top coat to an existing finish

Metallic Finishes – Generates the illusion of metal or provides accent

Wallpapering – Alternative to painting – costly and should be done on hard flats Specialized Finishing Techniques Spattering

Process of applying small drops of paint to a surface

Age the paint job, alter the hue, smooth out irregularities of base coat

Can be done by hand or with a garden sprayer

(Hudson is the brand preferred by many professional scenic artists) Standard Texture Coats In scale a 1’ sq grid is drawn on the elevation

In full-scale, 1’ sq grid is placed on the surface

Painter makes transfer of information using grid for placement Grid Transfer Oldest form of scene paint
Pigment and filler are pre-mixed and kept in dry form (powder)
Requires size water to create the paint…

Size water – A mixture of one cup hot animal glue and one tablespoon of Lysol per gallon of warm water (white glue can be substituted)

Comes in wide range of colors (See Table 10.1 – pg. 250)
Relatively inexpensive & stores indefinitely
Going ‘out of style’

Size water will spoil!!! – Throw it away!!!
Don’t use spoiled paint!!! Dry Pigment and Binder **most scenic paints are water-vehicle paints – nonflammable / less expensive / easier to mix /
quicker to dry / lighter in weight / easier to clean 4 Elements of Paint

1. Pigment – Material that imparts color to a paint or dye
2. Filler – Material that creates opacity in paint
3. Vehicle – Liquid medium – water, oil, lacquer, and the like – in which pigments, fillers, and binders are suspended to create a pain mixture; after the paint is applied, the vehicle evaporates
4. Binder – The adhesive that bonds the pigment and filler together Scenic Paints Applicators Paints Materials Temporary drop stretcher Drops must be stretched and framed before being painted

Horizontal vs. Vertical – once stretched this is the orientation painting will occur in

If being painted horizontal – may require bogus paper to absorb excess paint

If no existing frame, one will need to be built Drop Painting Techniques = Light
= Pigment Scene Painter’s Palette Vertical Painting Structures… Lining

Painting narrow, straight lines of varying widths – creates the appearance of depth

Uses highlight and shadow to ‘trick’ the eye Standard Texture Coats
Application here is being done in a cross-hatch pattern working from the top down in a vertical painting situation Smooth Base Coat

Vertical – paint top down
Horizontal – paint corner out

Keep brush fully loaded with paint

Keep a wet edge

Don’t scrub surface with brush

Dry pigment & binder – apply with a cross-hatch pattern to avoid brush marks Painting Techniques Auxiliary Scene-Painting Tools
Look at the images from top to bottom to see the stages of creating a graded base coat Graded Base Coat

One that generally changes hue or value over the height or width of the painted surface.

Common to ‘fake’ a sense of age or being well-worn

Requires speed – blend must be done while paint is wet – small areas at a time Painting Techniques With a feather duster With a sponge With a brush Stippling

Applies a heavier texture than spattering to the scenery

Uses an applicator loaded with paint in a random pattern Standard Texture Coats 4 3 2 1
1.Sharply textured, high-contrast curvilinear

2.Softly textured, low-contrast curvilinear

3.High-contrast linear scumble

4.Low-contrast linear scumble Scumbling

Blends several hues together – creates illusion of texture

Two guidelines –

Use a separate brush for each color to maintain integrity
Work rapidly – paints must be wet for blending to take place

Textures – rough plaster / wood / stone / dirt / etc. Painting Techniques Marble Stone Wood Foliage Applications of Painting Techniques
Full transcript