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Poetry

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by

Danielle Butler

on 21 January 2014

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Transcript of Poetry

Appreciating Poetry
While many poems are entertaining, a poem can also have the power to change how you see the world.

Whether it follows a set pattern or breaks all the rules, each poem uses language in a new way to communicate its message.
Stanzas
- like paragraphs in a poem

Lines
- make up a stanza

Form
- structure of the poem

Speaker
- the voice that talks to readers (like a narrator in a story)

Complete part A on your notesheet
The Basics

Rhyme
- the repetition of sounds at the ends of words (sun, one)

Repetition
- the use of a word, phrase, line, or sound more than once

Alliteration
- the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words (
m
ark,
m
ust,
m
ine)

Assonance
- the repetition of vowel sounds in words that don't end with the same consonant (b
ow
, d
ow
n)
Sound Devices
Language that appeals to one or more of your senses (sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch)

Vivid images help readers clearly understand what a poet describes
Imagery
Figurative language is imaginative descriptions that are not literally true

Figurative language creates imagery

Simile
- compares two things using the word like or as
Metaphor
- compares two things without using the word like or as
Personification
- giving a nonhuman thing human qualities and emotions
Hyperbole
- exaggeration
Onomatopoeia
- a word that imitates a sound
Figurative Language
The sun spun like a tossed coin

Vine leaves speaking among themselves in abundant whispers

Chimneys are bent legs bouncing on clouds below

Tick, tock

I knocked a thousand times before you answered the door!
Examples of Figurative Language
Lineage
by Margaret Walker

My grandmothers were strong.
They followed plows and bent to toil.
They moved through fields
sowing seed
.
They touched earth and grain grew.
They were full of sturdiness and singing.
My grandmothers were strong.

My grandmothers are full of memories
Smelling of soap and onions and wet clay
They have many clean words to say.
My grandmothers were strong.
Why am I not as they?

Practice
Strategies for Success in Reading Poems
Bring in the lyrics to a song. The song should be school appropriate.

If you question whether it's school appropriate, it's probably not!
Homework
Poetry
Slow down (sometimes you will need to read a poem several times)

Stop and clarify after every few lines or each stanza

Find the theme (message)

KEEP AN OPEN MIND!
example of rhyme scheme:
The ice was here, the ice was there (A)
The ice is all around (B)

It cracked and howled, it groaned and growled (C)
Like noises in a swound (B)

ABCB
Example of assonance
B
e
side the lake, b
e
n
ea
th the tr
ee
s

And miles to g
o
bef
o
re I sleep
Full transcript