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working across cultures

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Cate Evans

on 15 November 2016

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Transcript of working across cultures

What is culture? ?
The iceberg
This is an awareness test...
In this module
we will be examining different kinds of culture(s) and what we need to be aware of in order to work successfully with other people.

Weird or Just Different?
Working across culture(s)


C
ulture is the acquired knowledge people use
to interpret experience and generate behaviour.

Language


Appearance


Food
It's all on Moodle:
http://moodle.ipb.fr/course/view.php?id=411


In this module we will look at:
Above the waterline.(what is visible)
Below the waterline (what is invisible, including concepts of time, (monochronic, polychronic.....) power distance....
High and low context cultures
culture shock.
Who are we ? Our French mirror

do's and don't's when dealing with other cultures
Anthropologist James Spradley
Communication style
Beliefs
Attitudes
Values
Perceptions...
Gestures across cultures

Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions

http://www.clearlycultural.com/geert-hofstede-cultural-dimensions/
Who are we?
creating a mirror
Towards International and Transnational Management
HAIRL
The SHELL experiment

Helicopter (the ability to see things from above)
Analysis
Reality
Imagination
Leadership

With your partner, put them in the order you think is most useful for a manager
Britain:
Helicopter
Imagination
Reality
Analysis
Leadership
France:
Imagination
Analysis
Leadership
Helicopter
Reality

Netherlands
Reality
Analysis
Helicopter
Leadership
Imagination
ACHIEVEMENT
We need to reward what our people achieve based on skill but...
We want to avoid the instability that comes from only valuing the most recent performance so we must...
Respect who our people are based on their experience although...
We do not want to be hindered in our achievement by not challenging the satus quo so...
ASCRIPTION
RESPECT WHAT PEOPLE ARE SO WE CAN TAKE BETTER ADVANTAGE OF WHAT THEY DO
Verbal and Non-Verbal communication
Verbal
Accent
“I love your accent!” Why do we tend to like some accents and dislike others?
How much do we judge each other by our accents?

Tone of Voice
“Don’t take that tone of voice with me!” How does tone affect us? Vocal
expression varies greatly in different languages, high or low pitched, fast or
slow, rhythmic or clipped, hard or soft.

Volume
“Why do they have to talk so loudly?” Loudness or softness of speech is
culturally influenced. The softly-spoken may appear weak in a high-volume
country. Loudly-spoken people may appear pushy or rude where the majority
are quietly-spoken.

Rates of Speech
“Slow down! You’re not in the city anymore.” Just as country and city people
differ in their rates of speech in most cultures, so do people of different cultures.
Often, we judge people’s intelligence or emotional state by their rates of speech.

Idioms Metaphors slang
“Don’t beat around the bush.” Idioms are expressions peculiar to a language
such as “Keep your fingers crossed” and “Pull your socks up”. Metaphors are
figures of speech such as “a blanket of snow” or “a sea of troubles”.
 Proverbs
“Too many cooks spoil the broth” and other popular sayings, long in use, carry a
culture’s core values.
Each occupation and sector has its
own jargon.Slang is nonstandard language such as “A total chav!”, “ain’t”, “nope”, and many more.


• Body Language
• Object Language
• Environment Language
Body Language
Movement Gestures Posture
Distancing Gaze / Eye Contact Touch
Facial Expression Politeness Hygiene

Some Examples:

Distancing:
The comfortable distance between people talking varies between
cultures. In different cultures, there are different views and conventions regarding:
Intruding
Noise
Privacy
Use of space
Neighbour relationships
Public places
Gaze:
The degree to which people give eye contact or look at other people varies.
Gestures:

While most human gestures are easily read across cultures, important
variations include ways of pointing, beckoning, shaking hands, kissing or bowing.
Descriptive, praising or insulting gestures such as those for complicated, good,
expensive, crazy or stupid can vary widely.


Touching:
The degrees to which people touch each other in social interactions varies
across cultures and levels of relationship.

Touch Cultures:
Middle East Italy Greece
Spain Portugal Russia
Non-Touch Cultures
: Japan United States Canada
England Australia Scandinavia

"Middle Ground"
France China Ireland India Wales

Non-Verbal
What we say without talking. What we say with our dress, our objects,
our buildings, our gestures, eyes and faces.

Recap so far
We learn cultural norms as a child.
The ice-berg metaphore divides cultural aspects into:
What can be easily seen: appearance, language,..
What is more difficult to detect: values, ethics, beliefs...
People belong to their own culture but may be on the edge of the 'sugar mound'
There may be many 'cultures' within one 'culture'. Don't make assumptions.
Hofstede's dimensions (power distance, individuality, masculinity,uncertainty avaoidance,long-term orientation,indulgence) give an insight into culture
Culture manifests itself in for example, approach to time,business relationships,management styles...
Monochronic
cultures like to do just one thing at a time. Time keeping is important.They value a certain orderliness and sense of there being an appropriate time and place for everything.
They do not value interruptions. They like to concentrate on the job at hand and take time commitments very seriously.If you probably live in the
United States, Canada, or Northern Europe
, you live in a monochronic culture.

Polychronic
c
ultures like to do multiple things at the same time. Time is flexible.Multi tasking is the norm. A manager's office in a polychronic culture typically has an open door, a ringing phone and a meeting all going on at the same time. People are their main concern (particularly those closely related to them or their function) and they have a tendency to build lifetime relationships. The relationship is more immediately important than the task and objectives are more like desirable outcomes than
musts
If you live in
Latin America, the Arab part of the Middle East, or sub-Sahara Africa,
you probably live in a polychronic culture.
Recap
Full transcript