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ESL Students-Catering for Diversity

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Peggy Lee

on 18 October 2013

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Transcript of ESL Students-Catering for Diversity

Implications
Notes
Activity
What are some of the ways to bring out the most of ESL students to achieve the best in their ability and as more and more of them are choosing the Australia education
- Teachers are denying the responsibility to cater for ESL students
- All knowledge of teaching are expected to be provided by ESL teachers only
- Strong expectations of ESL learners and teachers
- Grounded stereotypes of ESL students
- Minimum will to accept the quick change of standard therefore, not catering for the current education standard of these ESL students

ESL - English as a Second Language
Statistics
Almost one in five Australians speak a language other than English at home (ABS, 2013)

Approximately 12% of students in Queensland state schools are ESL students (DETE, 2012)
Teaching Strategies
Conclusion
Embrace diversity!
Know your ESL students
Disregard stereotypes
Teachers are pressured to provide diversity and positive attitude in their teaching but the outcome is often questioned or at times, minimal. This is due to the difficulty many teachers face when it comes to catering for ESL students.
ESL - English as a Second Language
"ESL student" is a broad term used to describe students for whom English is not their native language.
DO or DON'T?
Treat English as a separate subject for ESL students to be taught by ESL teachers and English teachers.
DO or DON'T?
Use unnatural speech to communicate with ESL students, such as baby talk, shouting or talking excessively slow.
DO or DON'T?
Use non-verbal cues (such as gestures, pictures and objects) in your teaching to assist comprehension.
(Shoebottom, 2013)
(Shoebottom, 2013)
(Shoebottom, 2013)
Other Acronyms
ELL = English Language Learner
ESOL = English to Speakers of
Other Languages
LES = Limited English Speaker
NEP = Non-English Proficient
Importance for Beginning Teachers
Teachers’ decisions significantly impact on ESL students’ futures (Williams, 2001)
When teaching ESL students, teachers need to simplify language, not content (Fu, 2004)
Need to understand ESL students' backgrounds and needs to better assist them (Miller & Endo, 2004)
References
Arkoudis, S., & Love, K. (2004). They’re all over the Shop: Chinese International Students in the VCE. TESOL in Context 14(1/2), 10-14. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au
Arkoudis, S., & Love, K. (2006). Teachers’ stances towards Chinese international students: An Australian case study. Linguistics and Education 17(3). 258-282, Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.library.uq.edu.au/10.1016/j.linged.2006.11.002
Australian Bureau of Statistics [ABS]. 2013. The ‘Average’ Australian. Retrieved from http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Main+Features30April+2013
Brown, J. (2005). ‘I Love Teaching ESL’ Constructions of ESL teacher Work and Identity. TESOL in Context 15(1), 13-18. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au
Cintron, K.M. (2013). Strategies for Teaching ESL Student – ESL Students in the Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.eslpartyland.com/teaching-esl-student
Department of Education, Training and Employment [DETE]. (2012). English as a second language (ESL) / English as a second dialect (ESD). Retrieved from http://education.qld.gov.au/parents/school-life/support-services/esl.html
Fu, D. (2004). Teaching ELL students in regular classrooms at the secondary level. Voices from the Middle, 11(4), 8-15. Retrieved from http://www.ncte.org/journals/vm
Graham, R. (2009). Country names in Japanese. Retrieved from http://www.genkienglish.net/genkijapan/countriesinjapanese.htm
Hammond, J. (2008). Challenging Pedagogies: Engaging ESL Students in Intellectual Quality. The Australian Journal of Language and Literacy 31(2), 101-105. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au
Harmer, J. (2007). The Practice of English Language Teaching (4th ed.). UK: Pearson Education Limited. Retrieved
http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.library.uq.edu.au/10.1016/j.linged.2006.11.002
Miller, P. M., & Endo, H. (2004). Understanding and Meeting the Needs of ESL Students. The Phi Delta Kappan, 85(10), pp. 786-791. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/20441682
O’Neill, S., & Gish, A. (2008). Teaching English As A Second Language. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press.
Priester, M. M. (2011). Using Song Lyrics in the Preschool ESL Classroom to Assist Students’ English Vocabulary Retention and Use. (Order No. 1492195, Caldwell College). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, 54. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com
Queensland Government. (2009). Some Strategies to Address Recognition of Difference. Retrieved from http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=44267
Queensland Government. (2013). Explicit language teaching. Retrieved from http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=51627
Queensland Studies Authority [QSA]. (2006). Early years curriculum guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/p_10/ey_cg_06_text.pdf
Shoebottom, P. (2013). Classroom guidelines. Retrieved from http://esl.fis.edu/teachers/support/guide.htm
Ting, C., & Gilmore, L. (2012). Attitude of Pre-service Teachers Towards Teaching Deaf and ESL Students. Australian Journal of Teacher Education 37(12), 1-12. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/EJ995273.pdf
Williams, J. A. (2001). Classroom conversations: Opportunities to learn for ESL students in mainstream classrooms. The Reading Teacher, 54(8), 750-757. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/20204989
Teaching strategies
"Children should not be discouraged from using their home languages in play with other children who speak the same language." (QSA, 2006)

Students may feel threatened and unwilling to learn if their cultural identity is taken away
Allow development of home languages as students
can transfer understandings to
SAE (Standard Australian English)
Avoiding Over-correction
Negativity and disengagement towards learning especially during early stages of SAE learning
Let students know it's OK to make mistakes
Find the right balance between correcting errors and explicit language teaching
Teaching strategies
Visual clues
Modify your language
Encourage students to speak English out side the class
Encourage students to respond and seek assistance
Present the information in a manageable "chunks"
Clarify what is required in assessments
Allow more time during exams
Allow them to use a bi-lingual dictionary for the interpretation questions
Predictable Routines
Group work, Pair work
Understand the individual needs
Making sure the students know what's going on in class
Ask questions to check their understanding
Repeat & Rephrase
Making sure instructions are clear
Respect First Languages
Break It Down, Build It Up
Break it down (planning)
Analyse language demands to determine what students need to do to complete task
Build it up (teaching)
Sequencing teaching/learning of curriculum content to address these demands
Break It Down
Step 1. What do students need to do?
relevant curriculum document and analyse language requirements of assessment tasks
Step 2. What can students already do?
use work samples to find out their proficiency level
Step 3. What is in the gap?
Use information collected from Steps 1 and 2 and identify gap
10 Step practical approach that guide teachers to support ESL learners in whole class settings
Applied to all subject areas from Prep to Year 12
Successfully used in over 50 QLD schools
Build It Up
Step 4. Bridge across
Set text as foundation that can be revisited in different ways
Step 5. Make meaning, build language and develop oral skills
Create oral, kinaesthetic, visual and art activities
Step 6. Apply language to develop literacy
create and explore other relevant texts
Step 7. Expand understandings of focus content areas
not learning about language but learning through language
Step 8. Engage with assessment
Support students to respond to assessment tasks through knowledge developed in earlier steps
Break it down
Step 9. How well did students progress?
Make judgements on work produced against the criteria
Step 10. How well are students developing?
Monitor student's progress and be informed about future teaching
Cintron, K.M. (2013). Strategies for Teaching ESL Student – ESL Students in the Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.eslpartyland.com/teaching-esl-student
Harmer, J. (2007). The Practice of English Language Teaching (4th ed.). UK: Pearson Education Limited.
O’Neill, S., & Gish, A. (2008). Teaching English As A Second Language. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press.
Priester, M. M. (2011). Using Song Lyrics in the Preschool ESL Classroom to Assist Students’ English Vocabulary Retention and Use. (Order No. 1492195, Caldwell College). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, , 54. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.library.uq.edu.au/docview/868328474
Queensland Government. (2009). Some Strategies to Address Recognition of Difference. Retrieved from http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=44267
Graham, R. (2009). Country names in Japanese. Retrieved from http://www.genkienglish.net/genkijapan/countriesinjapanese.htm
Graham, R. (2009). Where are you from? Song Learn Japanese GenkiJapan.net [Recorded by GenkiJapan.net]. On Youtube. Retrieved from
Resources?
Implications
Full transcript