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Experiment to show how temperature of water affects the dyeing of a piece of fabric

Shen Ferrer, Laura Gil, Alessandra Rey
by

Laura Gil :)

on 14 December 2012

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Transcript of Experiment to show how temperature of water affects the dyeing of a piece of fabric

Shen Ferrer, Laura Gil, Alessandra Rey How the temperature of water affects the dyeing of a piece of fabric Aim: To investigate how varying temperatures of water, such as boiling, warm, room temperature, cold, and freezing, affect the dyeing process of a cotton piece of fabric. Materials: Hypothesis: When the fabric is immersed in a dye mixture with higher temperatures, it will transport faster through the fabric because the rate of reaction of molecules increases in higher temperatures due to the faster movement of particles in the dye. There is a higher chance for collision and therefore a faster rate of reaction.
When the fabric is immersed in a dye mixture with lower temperatures, it will transport slower through the fabric because of a slower rate of reaction. Particles are less likely to collide as cold temperatures slow down their movement. Variables: Method: 1.Cut 10 cm by 10 cm squares of white cloth (5 squares)
2.Pour 300 cm³ of water in a bucket and leave it until it reaches room temperature (23°C).
3.Weigh 0.5g of dye in a plastic dish on the digital balance and put it in the bucket with the measured water
4.Then put 0.3g of salt into the bucket and stir it until dissolved
5.Immerse one square of cloth and put it in the bucket and wait 15 min. 6. Repeat steps 1-4 with different temperature of water, first with warm water, (72°C) using kettle, then with boiling water, (100°C) by heating in it with a Bunsen burner, later with cold water, (10°C) using a piece of ice, and finally with freezing water, (0°C) by putting 8 ices into the beaker until it reaches 0°C.
7.After the 15 minutes in each one, rinse the fabric in tap water, then dry them with a hair dryer
8. Record results and compare them using a colour scale. Results 1
2
3
4
5
6 Boiling Warm
Room Temp. Cold
Freezing State of water: Colour intensity: Conclusion Evaluation This test can be considered fair as we had one independent variable, the varying temperatures, and many controlled, this means, we only tested the effects of temperature on the dyeing process and not many different factors. However, we must consider that there were many flaws in the experiment that could obstruct the results. Firstly, as we used a 500 cm3 beaker, our measurements of water could not always be exact, in order to improve this, we should use a graduated cylinder. Another error is one of human error as we cannot time exactly how long the fabric was immersed in the dye solution or rinsed and dried, in order to fix this, we must use a machine with a timer to perform the experiment. Temperatures may also vary as the water was constantly cooling, this can be avoided by using a water bath with a controlled temperature. After performing the experiment, we can conclude that our hypothesis was correct as the fabric was dyed most efficiently in a mixture using boiling water (100 degrees C) in comparison to the other tests, including freezing (0 degrees C), cold (10 degrees C), room temperature (23 degrees C), and warm water (72 degrees C). It can be seen that the fabric immersed in a dye mixture and boiling water has the most constant and bright color in comparison to the other fabrics. The fabric immersed in a dye mixture with cold temperatures has many color inconsistencies and is not as bright as the optimal color. Our hypothesis stated that when the fabric is immersed in a dye mixture with higher temperatures, it would transport faster through the fabric because the rate of reaction of molecules increases in higher temperatures due to the faster movement of particles in the dye. This is affirmed by our experiment because the colder the temperature of the water where the fabric was immersed, the less intense and consistent was the result of the fabric’s color. In conclusion, the warmer the temperature of the water of the dye mixture, the more effective the dyeing process will be and thus, the fabric will be dyed a vibrant and consistent color. This is in comparison to the other fabrics from other temperatures of dye mixture where the difference in color is visible and there are patches of discoloration throughout the fabric. The reason this occurs is because as temperature increases, molecules move faster, increasing the chance for collisions between themselves, thus increasing the rate of reaction. As temperature decreases, molecules will move slowly, causing fewer chances for collisions and decreasing the rate of reaction.
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