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The Pantoum

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by

Kristen Rou

on 5 April 2016

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Transcript of The Pantoum

The pantoum originated in Malaysia in the fifteenth-century as a short folk poem, typically made up of two rhyming couplets that were recited or sung.

However, as the pantoum spread, and Western writers altered and adapted the form, the importance of rhyming and brevity diminished.
It comprises a series of quatrains (stanzas made up of 4 lines), with the second and fourth lines of each quatrain repeated as the first and third lines of the next.

The second and fourth lines of the final stanza repeat the first and third lines of the first stanza.
One exciting aspect of the pantoum is its subtle shifts in meaning that can occur as repeated phrases are revised with different punctuation and thereby given a new context.
September Elegies
The
Pantoum
by
Randall Mann
Your poems
- Form must stay true

- 5 stanza (4 lines per stanza)
minimum


Another Lullaby for Insomniacs

Sleep, she will not linger:
She turns her moon-cold shoulder.
With no ring on her finger,
You cannot hope to hold her.

She turns her moon-cold shoulder
And tosses off the cover.
You cannot hope to hold her:
She has another lover.

She tosses off the cover
And lays the darkness bare.
She has another lover.
Her heart is otherwhere.

She lays the darkness bare.
You slowly realize
Her heart is otherwhere.
There's distance in her eyes.

You slowly realize
That she will never linger,
With distance in her eyes
And no ring on her finger.

Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4

Line 2 repeated
Line 5
Line 4 repeated
Line 6

Line 5 repeated
Line 7
Line 6 repeated
Line 8

Line 7 repeated
Line 9
Line 8 repeated
Line 10

Line 9 repeated
Line 1 repeated
Line 10 repeated
Line 3 repeated

By
A. E.
Stallings
There are those who suffer in plain sight,
there are those who suffer in private.
Nothing but secondhand details:
a last shower, a request for a pen, a tall red oak.

There are those who suffer in private.
The one in Tehachapi, aged 13.
A last shower, a request for a pen, a tall red oak:
he had had enough torment, so he hanged himself.

The one in Tehachapi, aged 13;
the one in Cooks Head, aged 15:
he had had enough torment, so he hanged himself.
He was found by his mother.

The one in Cooks Head, aged 15.
The one in Greensburg, aged 15:
he was found by his mother.
“I love my horses, my club lambs. They are the world to me,"

the one in Greensburg, aged 15,
posted on his profile.
“I love my horses, my club lambs. They are the world to me.”
The words turn and turn on themselves.

Posted on his profile,
“Jumping off the gw bridge sorry”:
the words turn, and turn on themselves,
like the one in New Brunswick, aged 18.

Jumping off the gw bridge sorry
.
There are those who suffer in plain sight
like the one in New Brunswick, aged 18.
Nothing but secondhand details.


Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4

Line 2 repeated
Line 5
Line 4 repeated
Line 6

Line 5 repeated
Line 7
Line 6 repeated
Line 8

Line 7 repeated
Line 9
Line 8 repeated
Line 10

Line 9 repeated
Line 11
Like 10 repeated
Line 12

Line 11 repeated
Line 13
Line 12 repeated
Line 14

Line 13 repeated
Line 1 repeated
Line 14 repeated
Line 3 repeated

Feeling overwhelmed?
Pantoums are due
for workshop
next Tuesday,

April 12.
Full transcript