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Untitled Prezi

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Natalie Kruger

on 26 March 2013

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Background Steps: Data Benefits Wilson Reading -Originally written for adults with Dyslexia.

-Unlike traditional phonics programs in that the instruction is very interactive and multisensory.

-According to N.I.H., 75-80% of the special education students identified as LD have their basic deficits in language and reading.

-Will teach students how to fluently and accurately decode.

-There are 12 steps: Steps 1-6 exclude sound options in order to establish a solid foundation. Steps 7-12 present sound options and the rules for adding suffixes to changing base words. -During each lesson when they get
to part 4 the teacher will select 15 words that go with the material they are learning.

-The student applies the taught skills independently.

-The teacher charts only errors and goes off the first words said out loud.

-Students can shade in the number of words read correctly.

-Reason for charting is to determine a students independent application of the decoding skills. Article 2 The aim of this study was to determine whether special education pull-out programs with teachers trained in the Wilson Reading System yield significant growth in students' reading and spelling skills. Data from pre-tests and post-tests were analyzed to determine student gains in word attack, reading comprehension, total reading and spelling.

Pre-test September
Post-test May/June
Of the 220 students, 92 were in grades 3 and 4, and 128 were in grades 5-12. These students had a total reading score on the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised at least two years below their grade placement. By: Amy Lyford, Lauren Clark,
and Natalie Kruger The 15% solution: Literacy and learning disabilities -The Wilson Reading System was published in 1988.

-It is currently in its 3rd edition.

-It directly teaches the structure of words in the English language so that the students master the coding system for reading and spelling.

-Includes sight word instruction, vocabulary, oral expressive language development and comprehension.

-The Wilson Reading System was published in 1988.

-It is currently in its 3rd edition.

-It directly teaches the structure of words in the English language so that the students master the coding system for reading and spelling.

-Includes sight word instruction, vocabulary, oral expressive language development and comprehension.

-Students with Dyslexia
-Students unable to decode accurately:
-slow, labored readers who lack fluency
-students who may know many words by sight, but have difficulty reading new words and "nonsense'' syllables
-students who often guess at words
-Students able to speak and understand English, but not read or write it (ESL students)
-Poor spellers
-Students unsuccessful with other reading programs or who still have "gaps'' in their decoding and/or spelling A library literacy team was looking for program with accountability and tried the Wilson Reading program. Many people within the program were not making significant progress, they originally thought it would suit around 20% of their students. It didn't take long for it to become clear that many more students would benefit from the system. Schofield They now screen all incoming students for phonological awareness and internalization of "the sound/symbol code of the language." Schofield says "it's relatively easy." Training is the key. The programs retention rate has tripled in last three years. Over 75% of students are still active in the program more than a year after starting. Article 1 After an average of 62 Wilson reading lessons, the average gain for all students in word attack was 4.6grade levels, from a pretest average score of 2.85 to a post-test score of 7.44.

In the area of passage comprehension, the average gain was 1.6 grade levels, from a pretest average score of 3.46 to a post-test average of 5.05.

The total average reading gain was 1.9 grade levels, from a pretest average score of 3.38 to a post-test average of 5.24. Evidence of effectiveness Examples of Student Reader and workbook Level 1 reading Level 1 practice Level 6 reading Level 6 practice Resources www.wilsonlanguage.com
www.ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/interventionreport.aspx?sid=546
www.sedl.org/cgi-bin/mysql/buildingreading.cgi?showrecord=10
www.learning-inside-out.com
www.chsc.org Gorman, Audrey J. "The 15% Solution: Literacy And Learning Disabilities." American Libraries 28.5 (1997): 52. Education Research Complete. Web. 9 Mar. 2013. http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED447439.pdfEducation Commission of the States, Denver, CO. "Wilson Reading System." (1999): ERIC. Web. 9 Mar. 2013. Wilson, Barbara A. Wilson Reading System: Student Reader. Oxford, MA: Wilson Language Training, 2004. Print. Pretesting Placement Before the student is placed in the Wilson Reading program, the teacher will administer the WADE (Wilson Assessment of Decoding and Encoding). The teacher will take the scores from the WADE and decide which substep to place the student in.

-Substep 1.1 presents short vowel "a" and several consonants.
- Substep 1.3 presents teaches short vowels "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", consonants, and some digraphs. Substeps Students who should be placed in substep 1.1: -students unable to write/form letters
-non-readers
-readers at or below grade 1 reading level
-students who read three or less words on list 1 of WADE
-ESL, ESOL students Students who should be placed in substep 1.3 with slow pacing: -students reading at a grade 2 or grade 3 level on other standardized reading tests
-students who successfully decode four or more words on list 1 of the WADE but have difficulty beyond list 1
-students who read most or all words on list 1 and 2 but have difficulty after that Students who should be placed in substep 1.3 with faster pacing: -higher level students with gaps in their single word decoding as evidenced on the WADE
-students who can decode real words but have difficulty decoding the nonsense words
-all students beyond primary grades using the program for spelling only Video's feature Special Educator Carolyn Wright
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