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WRITING

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by

Evelyn Young

on 4 September 2013

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Transcript of WRITING

A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay.
WRITING
EXPOSITORY
What is an expository essay?

The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.
Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion.
Body paragraphs that include evidential support.
Leave an impression with your conclusion.
A bit of creativity!
ESSAYS
Tips for writing an introductory paragraph
1. Understand the essay's purpose.
2. Stick to the essay's topic.
3. Make a compelling argument.
4. Be clear--don't use vague or complicated
terms (like Calvin in the cartoon).
5. Make it interesting to intrigue the reader.

Many of Jane Austen's female protagonists embody a polemical persona that at the same time advances the feminist movement while savoring the traditional role of women in 18th century English society. Describe how Austen uses irony and indirect dialogue in her heroines to portray her ideal of womanhood and her criticism of gender stratification during her time.
How to begin writing the essay on the Austen prompt?
Determine what the essay prompt is asking you to do:
What, in YOUR opinion, is Austen's ideal of womanhood based on what you know of her characters?
What, in YOUR opinion, is Austen's criticism of gender stratification in 18th century English society?
How does Austen use irony and indirect dialogue throughout her novels?
Which of her protagonists exemplify the dualism of progress and stagnation for the female gender?
...While matrimony is a focal topic in her work, Austen takes a wry view to the traditional institution of marriage. Her female protagonists exhibit a sense of independence, intellectualism, and defiance that necessarily commands attention from the men in society. Those qualities, coupled with their moral uprightness, gentility, and natural regard for others make Austen's characters charmingly suited for her vision of womanhood. Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliot, and Emma Woodhouse are all heroines in her novels that personify the tension between progress and tradition. Through the use of these characters, Austen challenges the readers of her time to recognize that the modern-day women not only embodies all of the characteristics of womanhood, but are also every bit men's equal in reason and intellect.
Know where you're going before you begin writing.
1. Determine how you are going to frame your arguments.
2. Make an outline of the paragraphs that you intend to write.
3. Arrange the paragraphs so that the arguments flow smoothly from one to the next.
How Austen uses the protagonists, Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliott, and Emma Woodhouse to challenge 18th century English society's view of womanhood.
Elizabeth Bennett
Traditional:
Strong sense of virtue
Strong sense of propriety
Progressive:
Sharp wit and tongue
Disregard for class decorum
Anne Elliot
Traditional:
Meek, soft-spoken, and maternal
Strong sense of propriety
Progressive:
Men seek her counsel
Disregard for class
Emma Woodhouse
Traditional:
Strong sense of duty
Strong sense of filial piety
Progressive:
Has no inclination for marriage, although perfectly willing to play the role of the matchmaker
Has things too much her way
Conducts herself with carelessness in public
Now that you have an outline of your paragraphs, look through the text(s) to find specific examples for your arguments. Use direct quotes from the text(s) to substantiate your claims.
How Austen uses the protagonists, Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliott, and Emma Woodhouse to challenge 18th century English society's view of womanhood.
Elizabeth Bennett
Traditional:
Strong sense of virtue
(i.e. her recommendation to her father to prevent Lydia from going to Brighton on account of preserving her reputation)
Strong sense of propriety
(i.e. knows when to "check" herself and the conduct of her mother and younger sisters)
Progressive:
Sharp wit and tongue
(i.e. her debate with Darcy regarding the definition of an "accomplished woman")
Disregard for class decorum
(i.e. Her equal bluntness with Darcy and Lady Catherine de Bourgh, unlike her sycophantic cousin, Mr. Collins)
Anne Elliot
Traditional:
Meek, soft-spoken, and maternal
(i.e. defers to the judgment of others, speaks when spoken to, always ready to nurse those who are ill)
Strong sense of propriety
(i.e. understands the need to retrench, unlike Sir Walter and Elizabeth)
Progressive:
Men seek her counsel
(i.e. her quick judgment when Louisa Musgrove lost consciousness)
Disregard for class
(i.e. her willingness to associate with Captain Wentworth and Mrs. Smith, despite her status as a baroness)
Emma Woodhouse
Traditional:
Strong sense of duty
(i.e. plays her part in hosting events as the mistress of the house)
Strong sense of filial piety
(i.e. refuses to leave her father on account of his attachment to her)
Progressive:
Has no inclination for marriage, although perfectly willing to play the role of the matchmaker
Has things too much her way
(see p. 1)
Conducts herself with carelessness in public
(i.e. teasing Miss Bates about her endless prattling and her unfitting behavior toward Frank Churchill)
Tips for writing your conclusion:
1. Answer the question "so what"? Why was your paper
worth reading?
2. Don't summarize; synthesize! What new ideas came
to mind as you were writing this paper?
3. Redirect your readers. Leave them with something to
think about.
4. Create a new meaning. Perhaps Austen wasn't so
progressive in her portrayal of womanhood after all?
Source: LEO: Literacy Education Online Strategies for Writing a Conclusion
What
does
that
even
mean???
Many of Jane Austen's female protagonists embody a
polemical persona
that at the same time
advances the feminist movement while savoring the traditional role of women
in 18th century English society. Describe how Austen uses
irony and indirect dialogue
in her heroines to portray her
ideal of womanhood
and her
criticism of gender stratification
during her time.
Source: Purdue Online Writing Lab
Full transcript