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Social Contract Theory

Historical look at the Social Contract Theory

michael segovia

on 15 August 2013

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Transcript of Social Contract Theory

Social Contract Theory
Social contract theory, nearly as old as philosophy itself, is the view that persons’ moral and/or political obligations are dependent upon a contract or agreement among them to form the society in which they live
Socrates uses something quite like a social contract argument to explain to Crito why he must remain in prison and accept the death penalty.
Thomas Hobbs
Social contract theory is rightly associated with modern moral and political theory and is given its first full exposition and defense by Thomas Hobbes.
After Hobbes, John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau are the best known proponents of this enormously influential theory, which has been one of the most dominant theories within moral and political theory throughout the history of the modern West.
Believed without ordered government man would destroy himself
Locke Believed
That for the most part
men are good and they
don't need all that much
Governmental control
“Man was born free, and he is everywhere in chains”
Rousseau's Quote...
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