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Emily Dickinson

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Valentina Suarez

on 18 December 2014

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Transcript of Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson
Poetic Style
Written in first person

Lacking titles

Emphasizes with dashes and capitalization.

Focused on the impact of the words rather than critiquing the form of the poem.
(Amherst College 1)

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Letter Writing

Communicated with others through writing letters
(Ferlazzo 127)

Sent over 1,000 letters
(Ferlazzo 125)

"A letter always feels to me like immortality because it is the mind alone without corporeal friend. Instead in our talk to attitude and accent, there seems a spectral power in thought that walks alone."-Emily Dickinson
(Ferlazzo 125)
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Emily Dickinson's Poetry
Manually made about 40 volumes of poetry, adding up to about 1,800 poems.

Poetry wasn't publicly shown.
(Academy of Poets 1)

"Within short, compact phrases she expressed far-reaching ideas; amidst paradox and uncertainty her poetry has an undeniable capacity to move and provoke."
(Pettinger 1)
Hope is the Thing With Feathers
Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all,

And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.

I've heard it in the chillest land,
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me.

-Emily Dickinson

(Academy of American Poets)




Emily Dickinson - Childhood
Emily Dickinson was born in the town of Amherst, Massachusetts on December 10, 1830. (Pettinger 1)
Her family bought a house in what is now North Pleasant street in Amherst when she was 9 years of age. (Amherst College 1)
Emily Dickinson - Childhood
V.S
Dickinson's pious and straightlaced father monitored his childrens reading material. He thought of poets such as Walt Whitman to be
"too inappropriate". (Pettinger 1)
V.S
Emily Dickinson - Childhood
Emily's hobbies included singing, playing the piano, taking walks, writing letters, gardening, baking, and going to church. She enjoyed attending school and in her teen years she bloomed into a social butterfly. (Amherst College 1)
Emily Dickinson - Childhood
Although Emily was rasied within the Calvinism religeon and attended church with her family, Emily herself was not a religious person and did not agree with the base beliefs Calvinism. (Pettinger 1)
V.S
Emily Dickinson - Childhood
Writting became increasingly important to Emily in her early twenties. As she got older, her poems revealed more about her.
Some of her poemes prompted question of death due to frequent burials, including her cousin Sophie Holland's, in the town cemetery.
(Amherst College 1)
Emily Dickinson - Childhood
V.S
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Emily attended Amherst Academy for 7 years before attending Mount Holyoke Female seminary for 1 year in 1847
Alone Within a World of Words
Private "recluse"
(Pettinger 1)

Isolation due to mental illness (debated)
(Ferlazzo 80)

"While the poems may be a product of person tragedy, they remain a testament to Emily Dickinson's ultimate triumph."
(Ferlazzo 95)
Dickinson Homestead
(Google Images)
About the Poetry
"A keen observer she used images from nature, religion, law, music, commerce, medicine, fashion, and domestic activites to probe universal themes: the wonders of nature, the identity of the self, death, and immortality, and love."
(Amherst College 1)

Most poems written during the Civil War
(Pettinger 1)
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Publicly Recieving Emily Dickinson's Poetry
Vinnie Dickinson found poetry upon Emily's death
(Pettinger 1)

1890- First edition of Emily's poetry published, edited by a neighbor, Mabel Loomis Todd and Thomas W. Higginson
(Ferlazzo 12)

"If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me I know
that's
poetry. If I physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know
that
is poetry. These are the only way I know it. Is there any other way."
-Emily Dickinson
(Amherst College 1)

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Dickinson and Friend
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Later years- 1865-1886
S.B
In the year 1866 Emily Dickinson did not write many poems due to personal losses.
She did not want to leave her house.
She started to talk to visitors through a door.
When seen in public she would be wearing a white cotton dress.
She did accept a visit from Higginson.
After Emily Dickinson's death.
Emily Dickinson passed away from Bright's disease after several other of her family members at the age of 56.
Her remaining family found almost 1800 fascicles.
These were edited and published over the years by Mabel Loomis Todd, Thomas W. Higginson, Thomas H. Johnson, and R.W.Franklin.
After Emily Dickinson's death
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Works Cited
Emily Dickinson - Childhood
Dickinson thought that early ideals of American travelers such as principles of honesty, simplicity, and high minded morals should be kept alive. (Pettinger 1)
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"Emily Dickinson Museum." Emily Dickinson Museum. Trustees of Amherst College, 2009. Web. 14 Dec. 2014. <http://emilydickinsonmuseum.org/>.


"Emily Dickinson." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, 2014. Web. 16 Dec. 2014. <http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/emily-dickinson>.


"Emily Dickinson." Poets.org. Academy of American Poets, 2013. Web. 16 Dec. 2014. <http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/emily-dickinson>.


Ferlazzo, Paul J. Emily Dickinson. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1976. Print.

Pastan, Linda. "Biography of Emily Dickinson." Biography of Emily Dickinson. Virginia Commonwealth University, 2014. Web. 16 Dec. 2014. <http://
www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/ED303/emilybio.html>.


Pettinger, Tejvan. "Biography of Emily Dickinson ." Biography Online. Oxford, 26 June
2006. Web. 13 Dec. 2014. <http://www.biographyonline.net/poets/emily_dickinson.html>.


POET: EMILY DICKINSON - ALL POEMS OF EMILY DICKINSON.." Poemhunter.com. Poem Hunter, 2014. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.
A.A
(Amherst College 1)
(Poem Hunter 1)
Full transcript