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Denotation vs. Connotation

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by

Stevie Lopez

on 19 November 2014

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Transcript of Denotation vs. Connotation

• RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
• SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
• LS.9-10.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Content Standards
What is Connotation?
The thoughts, feelings, and emotions that are caused/associated by hearing or seeing a word.
The meaning the author is
implying
.
In Context
Connotation:


(Suggested, implied meaning)
What is Denotation?
The
literal
meaning of the word (the dictionary meaning of the word) with
OUT
any implications.

*Remember: Denotation = Dictionary *
Literal or Suggested Meaning?
Denotation & Connotation
By Miss Lopez
Example-
Homework:
Schoolwork that a student is required to do at home.
Denotation:

(Literal, dictionary definition)
Snake
\snāk/ n. a long limbless and scaly reptile
Snake
:

something evil or dishonest, sneaky

(This is a negative connotation)
Example-
Skinny suggest
"too thin"
. This is a
negative

connotation.
Slender suggests being
"attractively thin"
. Slender has a
positive
connotation.

Each of the following sentences contain two words that are similar in denotation (literal meaning) but are different in connotation (emotional meaning). With your shoulder partner, fill out this worksheet by using the context clues in the sentences below to choose the word that fits best.
Why Did We Learn About Denotation and Connotation?
Now lets watch this rap that will help you remember the difference between denotation and connotation.
Take notes on key terms/ideas that will help you remember the meanings.

http://www.flocabulary.com/word-choice/
Each of the following sentences contain two words that are similar in denotation (literal meaning) but are different in connotation (emotional meaning). With your shoulder partner, fill out this worksheet by using the context clues in the sentences below to choose the word that fits best.
With your group define the denotative meaning of
blink

and discuss the connotative meanings the author is implying.

While you read Fahrenheit 451 you will be choosing 3 examples from each chapter. You will choose three words you are unfamiliar with and find the denotative meaning of the word along with 2-3 connotative meanings.
I will pass out a graphic organizer to guide you as you read.
\snāk/-A limbless scaly reptile
Full transcript