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KS3 this term

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Ben Patchesa

on 24 August 2012

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Transcript of KS3 this term

Objectives:
- To use skills of prediction, empathy and relating to your own experiences to help you understanding reading better

Prediction:
Why does the seaman want the boy to watch out for the one-legged man?
What different ways could the story continue?

Empathise
How can we tell that the boy is scared of the one-legged man?

Relate to own experiences
Have you ever had nightmares which link to worries or things you have been thinking about during the daytime? How that one-legged man haunted my dreams, I need scarcely tell you. On stormy nights, when the wind shook the four corners of the house and the sea roared along the cove and up the cliffs, I would see him in a thousand forms, and with a thousand devilish expressions. Now the leg would be cut off at the knee, now at the hip; now he was a monstrous kind of a creature who had never had but the one leg, and that in the middle of his body. To see him leap and run and pursue me over hedge and ditch was the worst of nightmares. 1) Which phrases show that the weather can get very rough near to the inn?
2) How can we tell that the boy is terrified of the one-legged man? Year 8 learning journey

- Teacher assessment

- Peer assessment

-Self assessment

- Teacher assessment

-Independent learning

- Summative assessment 8En1 - Coordinate and adapt learning journey with this....

- Look at treasure island extract
- Create inferential image
- Look at skills of prediction /
empathy / relating to own
experience
- Writing continuation?

Frankenstein?
Reading opening of scene -
storyboarding? Writing report?

Monster's reply?

Great expectations opening - inference / description

Story star work

Language elements 8En1

- Look at treasure island extract
- Create inferential image
- Look at skills of prediction /
empathy / relating to own
experience
- Writing continuation?

Frankenstein?
Reading opening of scene -
storyboarding? Writing report?

Monster's reply?

Great expectations opening - inference / description

Story star work

Language elements Prediction:
Why does the seaman want the boy to watch out for the one-legged man?
What different ways could the story continue?

Relate to own experiences
Have you ever had nightmares which link to worries or things you have been thinking about during the daytime? Objectives:
- To plan paragraphs using the story star
- To practice using detailed phrases and more complex sentences
- To think about what makes a powerful opening

Homework:
Finish your planning sheet and write your opening paragraph - For tomorrow

Starter:
Using the whiteboard, write a detailed description of what you think the one legged man will be like

Plenary:
Which of these things you've planned would be the best way to start the story.
Begin writing your opening You planned the action in your story last lesson - well done! Write a description of the one legged man using good noun and verb phrases
- His face and build
- His clothing
- His manner / how he acts
- What he is holding
- How he moves What will happen next? Describe:
the time of the day
the light
the place What will the characters talk about?
How will they talk? How will the boy be thinking and feeling? (use first person) He was chubby, which meant that he
couldn't get around as quickly as he used to. Scarred, spotty face as if his parrot
had repeatedly attacked him a shadowy, whispering ghost
in a brown waistcoat
and black trousers a grumpy, bossy man who loudly shouted
every word he said holding a small, sharp, blood-rusted knife peculiar zig-zag hopping way of walking The silent darkness of midnight
In the fading dusk light on a cold winter's day

A gloomy, ghostly mist swept in from the sea
Lightening cracked like an electric whip as torrential rain battered the inn roof Objectives:
- To understand what makes an effectively focused reading answer

- To build description and events using deeper meanings that the reader has to use inference to access

by:
Starter
Identifying features in model answer

Main activities
Peer assessing questions written yesterday
Attempting the other question, trying to improve on first answer.
Introducing the story star, and trying to build effective, detailed description that uses deeper meaning
Order sections
See some more presentations

Homework:
Finish continuation for next Thursday

Plenary:
How have your details managed to achieve similar effects to Stevenson's writing?
- Plausible plot based on the opening to the novel
- Characterisation using description and dialogue
- Description of setting / Creation of atmosphere 'The use of onomatopoeia - 'the sea roared' - gets across the noise and power of a wind swept sea.
This a metaphor that suggests that the turbulent weather is like a powerful creature attacking the shore, which could also represent the boy narrator's fear of the sea, as he connects it in his mind to the 'one-legged man' of whom he is so afraid.'
This interpretation is compounded by the adverbial phrase, 'along the cove and up the cliffs'. Like the one-legged man in his dreams, the sea seems almost to 'persue' the narrator. as if intent on devouring him - Name language techniques efficiently to leading into the quotation

- Use a quotation embedded in your own sentence

- Comment on language techniques to help your explanation

- Explain in depth - ask 'why?' more than once, or suggest alternative interpretations

- Link points about different parts of the text fluently Objectives:
- To build description and events using deeper meanings that the reader has to use inference to access

by:
Starter
How important is each part of the story star to the opening of treasure island?

Main activities
Move around each 'base' devloping ideas for your continuation

Action
Character
Setting
Dialogue
Thoughts and feelings


Homework:
For Friday - finish your continuation


Plenary:
How will you order these different types of information?
How have your details managed to achieve similar effects to Stevenson's writing?
- Plausible plot based on the opening to the novel
- Characterisation using description and dialogue
- Description of setting / Creation of atmosphere A Witches' Spell!


Objectives:
- To use ideas about the supernatural
- To write using controlled ideas, rhyme and rhythm

TASKS:
Read the witches' spell from Macbeth in groups of 3

What kinds of ingredients are mentioned in the spells?

What commands or instructions do the witches make?

Plan your own ingredients

Work on the whiteboards to get good rhyming lines.

Write your ideas out in verses

Practise linking these and reading as a group Objectives:
- To understand the background to acclaimed pre-1914 writers
- To build ability to make detailed explanaions, using inference which zooms in closely on key details and language features.

Homework:
Plan a continuation of this story using these headings
Action
Character description
Setting description
Dialogue (speech)
Narrator's thoughts / Feelings

Starter:
Facts about Shakespeare and DIckens you remember from last lesson

Main tasks:
Presentations
Looking closely at details and usng inference and empathy
Predicting the next part of the story

Plenary:
Pick out strengths and weaknesses of your responses to the questions you answered togather Objectives:
- To judge the effectiveness of openings to stories
- To plan different types of information

by:
Starter
Negotiate success criteria for a well written opening
- Be descriptive - use similes / noun phrase etc
- Add one piece of action
- Start with a cliffhanger
- Introduce the main character
- Non-chronological - jump forward - flashback
- Create mystery - withhold information - get
the reader asking questions
- Dialogue - but don't reveal who is talking
- Describe setting in an atmospheric way

Look at strengths and weaknesses of planned openings - peer marking

Main activities
Complete final two parts of carousel
Plan a route through the information you have planned
See more presentations

Homework:
Finish continuation for Monday

Plenary:
How have your details managed to achieve similar effects to Stevenson's writing?
- Plausible plot based on the opening to the novel
- Characterisation using description and dialogue
- Description of setting / Creation of atmosphere Objectives:
- To judge pace of a story effectively by choosing story star elements thoughtfully
- To 'chunk edit' to ensure accuracy and consistency

by:
Starter
Give a detail from a random point of the SS
Success criteria:
Score each paragraph out of 10
- check and edit
- your personal writing targets
- opening:
Setting scene
Creating suspense
Set up the conflict

Partner marking
Score paragraphs out of 10 (from beginning)
Label where they've used A, C, S, D, TF
In brackets put how they could add these e.g. (A) (TF)
How well are they managing pace - too quick, too slow, just right?
Give feedback in relation to their writing targets
Correct any technical flaws

Half way point
What percentage of your story have you written?
Score yourself
- 5 points for each type of information you've used
- 10 points for each of your writing targets you've met
- 10 points for each of : ; - ...
- 20 points if all your dialogue has a comma, speech marks, capital letter and appropriate end punctuation . ! ?
- 15 points for each used flashback, speeding time up, chronological leaps
- 30 poins - used a deliberately short paragraph to create a dramatic effect



Main activities
Write and edit your story
Get a partner to score and check paragraphs

Homework:
Read your pre1914 book - report back on Monday
Finish continuation for a week on Friday

Plenary:
How well have you used the following story star elements:
Action
Character
Setting
Dialogue
Thoughts / Feelings?

How well have you
- Given details that reader has to use inference for
- Built tension
- Paced your story Objectives

- To select and comment on key details from reading and watching film
- To work successfully to build ideas in a group

Starter:
What would you need to consider if you were designing a monster or a robot?

1st attempt - explain differences between book and film verson
2nd attempt - what are our success criteria for doing a good job of this?
In the book version
- Clear introduction
- Things that are the same:
A lot of the conversation between Pip and the man is the same in the book and the film, for instance when Pip says: "Please don't eat me sir!".
- Used good linking words to introduce things that are different: on the other hand, however, although
Although the writing on Pip's parents' gravestone is the same in the book and the film, the film doesn't show the graves of his brothers and sisters
- Give your opinion about which works best
I think the book is better here, as it shows just how difficult and sad Pip's life has been, and shows how lucky he is to be alive.


Homework:
Draw, describe and label your own monster or robot.
8 or more out of 10 for effort - there will be photos! 81En3 MACBETH A Witches' Spell!


Objectives:
- To develop ideas in detail
- To use rhythm and rhyme
- To organise a longer piece in a group

KEY QUESTIONS / SUCCESS CRITERIA

TASKS:
What kinds of ingredients are mentioned in the spells?

What commands or instructions do the witches make?

Plan your own ingredients

Work on the whiteboards to get good rhyming lines.

Write your ideas out in verses

Practise linking these and reading as a group

Perform your ideas in a suitable way

PLENARY
How well did each group manage to meet the success criteria?

Lady Macbeth

Starter: Identify connectives in speech


Objectives:
- To get used to
- To pick out key ideas of characters
KEY QUESTIONS / SUCCESS CRITERIA

Try to answer these questions



What is Lady Macbeth trying to
persuade Macbeth to do?

23rd November

How does she try to do this?
What objections does Macbeth give why he does not do this?

1st attempt - answer, then share. Collect signatures from people you help. Gain a pound if you help someone, spend a pound if you get help (you start with £10)

Look at best answers and come up with success criteria for good answers

PLENARY

What are Lady Macheth's most persuasive reasons? Check punctuation / use more advanced punctuation
Colon. Introduces something - a fact, a list - creating a dramatic pause.
"It was him: the one legged man"
"Three thoughts raced into my mind: who is that? how did he get in? how can I escape?"
"The worst thing was this: where his right eye should have been was a dull, grey, scarred hollow"

Semi colon: Links two ideas that could survive on their own as sentences but are linked by topic. Acts instead of a connective.

I shivered; the wailing winter wind chilled me to the very core.
My breath ceased; someone had grasped me firmly round the neck

Alter length of sentences for effect:
One word / deliberately grammatically incomplete / simple / compound (and, but)
complex (subordinating conjunctions)

Check spelling Write down how you want your partner to check your work
- Rating how far you are through with a %
- Scoring paragraphs to work out which need improving
- Working in timed chunks then editing e.g 8/3 10/4 minutes
- Label key features (e.g. Story Star features)
- Edit punctuation - add more sophisticated types
- Improve words / phrases
- Check spelling
- Split sections up to create punchier, more dramatic paragraphing
- Change structure - add flashbacks / speed up time / chronological leaps Romeo and Juliet Romeo and his parents 21th November

Objectives:
- To use close reading to understand relationships
- To write using evidence and clear detailed comments
- To improve on writing targets from assessments

by
Annotating part of script by showing
- what parts mean
- what they show about relationships (use different colours)

What kind of relationship does Romeo have with his parents?
What do they think of him?
What does he think of them?
- Use evidence
- Explain clearly
- You may have more than one idea - if you do say: "They COULD
think ________ . However they COULD ALSO think _________"

First go - what have people done well?
What success criteria could we have for the second go?

Writing two diary entries showing how characters feel
1) For Romeo
2) For one of his parents

What are our success critieria?
- Your personal writing targets
- What else makes a good diary?

Plenary
Which of these success criteria have you met?
Explain to a partner, then say who has met the most (The winner!)

Homework:
Write a diary entry for Romeo / one of his parents showing how they feel after Act 1, Scene 1
FOR WEDNESDAY MONSTER/ ROBOT Materials - what is it going to be made from Appearance Size moves - no. of legs colour good / evil body parts use other animals / start from scratch / mutate eat / electrical shape male / female - clothes habitat - where it lives Objectives:
- To analyse section of a text using a range of strategies
- To evaluate which of these strategies is most effective

Homework: For Monday
- Take home a partner's book
- Transfer reading and writing targets to their target sheet
- Add spellings to the blank side
- Be prepared to talk them through what they need to do to improve
(Look at their folder / Get a target sheet if necessary)
Continue with carousel Objectives:
- To apply analytical skills (VIPER and story star) to pre1914 texts
- To understand the contextual background to pre 1914 texts

Main activities
- Watch presentations of pre-1914 authors
Add to your pre1914 presentation
-Write a review of the parts of your pre1914 book you have read
(use story star)
- Add a commentary applying VIPER (visualise, infer, predict, empathise, relate to own experiences), story star and linking contextual details

Homework:
Finish continuation for Monday

Plenary:
How well have you used the following story star elements:
Action
Character
Setting
Dialogue
Thoughts / Feelings?

How well have you:
- Identified and commented on language use (focus 5)
- commented on the structure (story star / pace) (focus 4)
- commented on which details help you to visualise and infer (focus 3)
- commented on the effect on you (predict, empathise, relate to own experiences) (focus 6)
- commented on the links to contexts (focus 7) Read first section of 'Frankenstein' creation scene:
In pairs, discuss how we could analyse this: Chapter 5
It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.
1
How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavoured to form? His limbs were in proportion, and I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful!--Great God! His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun white sockets in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion and straight black lips.
2
The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature. I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bedchamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep.
3
At length lassitude succeeded to the tumult I had before endured; and I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, endeavouring to seek a few moments of forgetfulness. But it was in vain: I slept, indeed, but I was disturbed by the wildest dreams. I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health, walking in the streets of Ingolstadt. Delighted and surprised, I embraced her; but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death; her features appeared to change, and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her form, and I saw the grave-worms crawling in the folds of the flannel.
4
I started from my sleep with horror; a cold dew covered my forehead, my teeth chattered, and every limb became convulsed: when, by the dim and yellow light of the moon, as it forced its way through the window shutters, I beheld the wretch -- the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks. He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped, and rushed down stairs.
5
I took refuge in the courtyard belonging to the house which I inhabited; where I remained during the rest of the night, walking up and down in the greatest agitation, listening attentively, catching and fearing each sound as if it were to announce the approach of the demoniacal corpse to which I had so miserably given life. Oh! no mortal could support the horror of that countenance. A mummy again endued with animation could not be so hideous as that wretch. I had gazed on him while unfinished; he was ugly then; but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion, it became a thing such as even Dante could not have conceived.
6
I passed the night wretchedly. Sometimes my pulse beat so quickly and hardly that I felt the palpitation of every artery; at others, I nearly sank to the ground through languor and extreme weakness. Mingled with this horror, I felt the bitterness of disappointment; dreams that had been my food and pleasant rest for so long a space were now become a hell to me; and the change was so rapid, the overthrow so complete! Sentence structure / type /
punctuation Words / phrases Action / Setting / Character / Dialogue /
Thoughts and feelings Visualise, infer Objectives:
To understand the plot of 'Macbeth' better
To understand how characters develop and change

Starter:
Come up with words that describe what Lady Macbeth is like in the scene we have looked at

Activity
Watch animated tales Macbeth
Answer questions Objective: to look at different ways of closely analysing a passage from a more challenging text What makes a good spoken discussion?
How can you improve your speaking and listening in groups?

Chairperson Chloe, Connor, Mpuya, Brandon
Scribe Scott
Creative

You are members of a company who design robots and monsters

Chief executive: You will introduce your company, and then introduce your monster or robot. You will say what it is designed to do – what problems will it be able to solve? What jobs is it designed to do?
Scientist: You will talk about how you made your robot or monster, and say how you designed its features. You will say what is working well but also say what problems you have had and how you’re trying to overcome them.
Salesperson: You will say how much your creation will cost, where it can be bought from and who can buy it. You will try to be as persuasive as you can to say how amazing it is.

Information
Creative ideas
Emotions
Positives
Drawbacks
Recording / presenting

Checkpoint 1: Year 7 learning journey

Comprehension of themes

research for historical context

Comparing use of imagery - Macbeth before and after killing Duncan?

Essay on themes: How doing bad things can change you year 8 learning journey
- Annotation of powerpoint resources (peer assessment)
- Display work on Frankenstein scene (self-assessment) / present
- Write own creation scene in the style of Shelley year 9 Starter: 3 words to describe Lady Macbeth near the beginning of the play Year 7 - drama area / year 11 area email Kate and Vicky
- Warm up:
- hotseating - lady Macbeth what are you feeling guilty about?
- nightmare
- sleepwalking - what is Lady Macbeth feeling guilty about - knocking, getting guards drunk, laying daggers ready, washing off blood, death of Banquo, (other two show fear,)
- discuss how we can learn parts most easily within half an hour
- plenary - which group showed this most clearly
- Second half annotate script using emotions portrayed in first half - talk through more difficult language in original script

Year 9 - drama area -
- Warm up: 3 still images
Juliet upset because of Romeo leaving / Dad trying to cheer her up
Dad breaking the news of the early wedding
Juliet saying she won't get married Objectives:
To understand the parent child / relationships in the play
To compare them
To find evidence that shows what they're like
EXT: To zoom in and comment on how language is used to present relationships Great Expectations Treasure Island Example of analysis Atmospheric setting Frankenstein Pre 1914 literature Last 5 lessons
1) Pair coaching based on targets / Display work - hwk: plan own creation scene
2) Apply reading skills to extracts in own presentation / review of book read.
3) Assessment a - write creation scene using
4) Assessment b - write commentary on creation scene
5) Review
6) Interform! Chapter 5
It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.
1
How can I describe my emotions at the birth of this wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had worked hard to make? His limbs were in proportion, and I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful!--Great God! His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these features only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same grey brown in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion and straight black lips.
2
I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of putting life into an lifeless body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health, but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bedchamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep.

3
Eventually I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, trying to sleep.
I slept, indeed, but I was disturbed by the wildest dreams.

4
I started from my sleep with horror; a cold dew covered my forehead, my teeth chattered, and every limb became convulsed: when, by the dim and yellow light of the moon, as it forced its way through the window shutters, I beheld the wretch -- the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks. He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped, and rushed down stairs. Time of year
How you felt while you were preparing
Weather
Place
How your creation comes to life How you feel as you bring it to life

Describe different parts of your creation Describe what you do next Add a twist - what bad thing could happen now? Objectives:
To plan detailed ideas
To use a range of different sentence types Wall of fame
(great work)
Caitlynn
Marcia
Jake
Katie H
Matthew
Josh B
Amy H
Lewis
Charlotte Discuss targets The hellish July heat pressed down on my from all sides as I danced excitedly around my garden shed. I was so proud. I was about to bring my incredible robot to life. As I prepared to flick the switch, a fork of lightning streaked across the sky and a sudden downpour pounded on the shed roof It was a dark summmer's night in my garden shed and in the distance a thunderstorm raged. The wind almost brought the shed to life, it was so powerful, but it was a hot and sticky wind, like the winds of Hell. I looked at my new invention.
I felt so proud and excited about what was about to happen: I was going to create life! Objective
U To show understanding of what characters are like
E To use evidence from texts
C To explain how you can work out what characters are like
Ch To explain how and why characters change How do Lady Macbeth and Macbeth change from early to late in the play? Early in the play, Lady Macbeth manages to persuade Macbeth to kill Duncan. She does this in a number of ways.
When Macbeth changes his mind and decides not to kill Duncan, she makes fun of Macbeth by saying:
"Was the hope drunk wherein you dressed yourself?"
She is showing her scorn of Macbeth by saying that he was brave earlier on because he was drunk, and now he has sobered up.
Later in the play, Lady Macbeth has no power to persuade Macbeth. After Duncan's death, Macbeth has killed his other victims, Banquo and Macduff's family without her help. We find out that "since Macbeth went to war" she has been alone. She is probably lonely and this might have led to her thinking about what she has done and feeling more and more guilty. Early in the play Lady Macbeth Early in the play Macbeth Later in the play Lady Macbeth Later in the play Macbeth How they change... Objectives Wave 1: Check work against accuracy success criteria and targets
Wave 2: Look at how work meets other criteria partner has chosen

Discuss.
Write commentary:
What key questions can you use?

Why did I vary my paragraph length?
Why did I use a particular image / piece of description?
However,
How could I have added _________ to my work?
What were the strongest parts?
What could I have improved?
What were you trying to achieve in different sections?
What did you do effectively?
Which reading strategies helped you to improve your writing
- Using story star
- Being aware of sentence types / more complex punctuation
- Helping reader to visualise / infer
- Helping reader to empathise
What could you have improved?
Which sections didn't work? Possible answers: What were you trying to achieve in different sections?
What did you do effectively?
Which reading strategies helped you to improve your writing
- Using story star
- Being aware of sentence types / more complex punctuation
- Helping reader to visualise / infer
- Helping reader to empathise
What could you have improved?
Which sections didn't work?
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