Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Medieval King's Daily Life

No description

Avery Goodman

on 19 May 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Medieval King's Daily Life

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
The blood, beatings, and burnings
BY Avery Goodman
Health and Wellness
Boredom and Entertainment
Personal diet was a cause of poor health. Kings had so much food they could get sick very frequently. They would get headaches, stomachaches, digestive problems, and gastural problems. Six out of every ten people had the black death. They would have swelling, severe fever, vomiting, muscular pains, bleeding lungs, and mental issues. The black death is why people see the over all wellness of the middle ages so disgusting (Alchin 1).
Bathing as a medieval king was not uncommon. They would also eat snacks in the bath! While someone was bathing the king he would eat. Working for the king would have been hard because he was a BIG DUDE! They would have a bath every two days to a week (Alchin 1).
Sleepy Time
Workers for the king
Going Potty in the Palace
Going Potty in the Palace
Privies were very common in medieval castles. They had two doors to eliminate the odor!
The privies were made of wood or stone. When the potty was filled with waste they would poor it out the window. Some had hole putting the the waste stright to the moat (Queenan 2).
The Injury of a King
A King's Injuries
The King's Court
They slept in canopy beds with curtains for privacy.
The mattress they had was stuffed with feathers covered in wool wrapped with silk. The blankets they had were made of animal skin the keep warm through the cold nights. They slept at the upper end of the great room. Their room was very big (Knight 1).

They played chess and recited legends and fairy tales. They went hunting when the weather was nice (Snepsts 1). King's would hire minstrels, magicians, jugglers, jesters, musicians, dancers, fire eaters, and acrobats. They played archery, wrestling, and hammer throwing. The popular sport to watch was jousting (Donn 1).
King's would make appearances to the serious crime tortures. The types of torture are ripping out teeth and nails, beating, blinding, boiling, bone-braking, burning, chocking, disfigurement, drowning, flaying (stripping off skin), roasting, limb removal, and quartering. There was blood and bones everywhere (Alchin 1).
For dinner they had seven or more courses. The first two courses
hare, stuffed chicken, voil of veal, german sauce with gilt sugar plums, and pomegranate. Then the next three courses they had roe-deer, pig, sturgeon cooked in parsley and vinegar covered with powdered ginger. The last course is a pie made of roe-deer, a gosling, three capon, six chickens, ten pigeons, and a rabbit. For breakfast and lunch they wold have deer, bore, hare, rabbit, onions, garlic, and leeks (Alchin 1).
Church and Prayer
The king would be the judge for very serious crimes such as MURDER. How it worked was the king would look at the victim and see if he was innocent or not (Wheeler 1).
aint that scary
Kings would travel to other kingdom
to conquer them on a weekly basis.
More land, more taxes, more money
(Snepsts 1).
Kings would travel to other kingdom
to conquer them on a weekly basis.
More land, more taxes, more money
(Snepsts 1).
A King would go to house and take or do
anything he wanted. He would take furiture,
animals, people, kids, and food (Snepts 1).
The king would pray everyday.
He would have his own room
to pray at their churches (Snenpts 1).
Their clothing consisted of breeches, stockings, shoes, coat, surcoat, head-dress.mbeaded with gold, silver, pearls, and precious stones. They wore luxury fur coats (Alchin 1). They also had clothes of silk (Queenan 1).
Jousting was very popular sport watched by kings. They would sit on a balcony and watch the joust. Jousting was mocked battles by knights on horses with lances (Donn 1).
There are many peasants for the king. There were ladies who would dress him every day, people to bathe him, people to clean up after his mess, people to nanny his kids, and chefs to make his food (Levi Biel 12).
Alchin, Linda. "Middle Ages." Middle Ages. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2014
Queenan, Pamela. "Medieval Lesson." N.p., May 2005. Web.
Donn, Mr. "Middle Ages for Kids." Middle Ages for Kids. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2014.
Wheeler, Heather. "Court." N.p., n.d. Web.
Knight, Eliza. "Curling Up With the Rats." N.p., July 2008. Web.
Snepts, Janis. "Life of a Medieval KIng." N.p., n.d. Web.
Biel, Timothy L. The Age of Feudalism. San Diego, CA: Lucent, 1994. Print.
Morton, David. "Medieval Medicine." N.p., 2009. Web.
Works Cited
Kings would not typically fight in battles. The would go to find new places to conquer. To do this they had to go through a long period to become a full knight. The periods of knights are page at seven, squires at fifteen, and knights when they are ready (Donn 1).
There were many daily injuries. Surgeries, stitches, and pulling out weapons. Surgery was very painful because people did not know much about the human anatomy so to deal with the pain they made more pain. In eye surgery they used a long medal stick to clean the cornea. If you had a cut they would take leaches and drain the "bad blood" and then wrap it. n battle they would pull arrow out of you then stitch it up (Morton 1).

The Peculiar Daily Life of a Medieval King
Full transcript