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GRAMMAR LESSON

Commonly misused words
by

Stephanie Salazar

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of GRAMMAR LESSON

PROPER GRAMMAR:
It's the
difference
between knowing your shit... and knowing you're shit.
So... let's start with the notorious "your" and "you're"
Notice the proper use of
"you're" and "your."
YOUR = Shows possession

YOU'RE = You are
Another example:
"
Your
bag is super gross."
OR
"
You're
super gross for wearing that bag."
WHO'S vs. WHOSE
what is she trying to say?
She's trying to say that trials show you WHO IS going to be there standing beside you.


WHO IS = WHO'S
As in, "Hey, Sisters,
who's
going to the Beta Gamma probate?"
OR
"Hey, Sisters,
whose
freaking shoes are at my house? Take them before I throw them away."
"Whose" shows possession, kind of like "your."

"Who's"
DOES NOT
show possession just because it has an apostrophe with an 's' at the end.

The apostrophe in "who's" is a substitution for "is."
So... if you can substitute your abbreviation with "who is," then you should use "
who's
."

If it doesn't make sense, then use "
whose
."

For example,
"__________ bottle of moscato is this? Claim it before I drink it."

...it doesn't make sense to say "Who is bottle of moscato is this?" Therefore, use "
whose
."
THERE
vs.
THEIR
vs.
THEY'RE
QUE PENA
DON'T LET THIS BE YOU!!!
A Lesson on Commonly Misused and Abused Words
Yeah, I know there's SO much more wrong with this, but let's focus on how much of an idiot she looks like solely based on the misuse of "there."
Okay, so she's trying to say "...when
they are
together." So why the hell is she using the same word she would use to point to something like, "hey, it's right over
there
" ? WHY?!
they're
OMG
Since I know no one in my beautiful
chapter would ever write something
like that, I'll just wrap this part up with
one short example:
"
They're
super opposed to using
their
cars because they've already
driven them over
there
twice."
It's so easy.
it's
vs.
its
Simple:
if you're not saying "
it is
," then DON'T use "
it's
."
This is another one of those words that is
NOT
possessive just because it has an apostrophe.
The possessive one actually lacks an apostrophe.
EXAMPLE:
"When scared, a turtle will hide inside
its
shell."

"I don't understand why girls wear Ugg boots when
it's
hot outside."
It's a bigger problem than you think.
then
vs.
than
oh man...
effect
vs.
affect
freshman
vs.
freshmen
For some odd reason, the word
"
freshman
"
does not exist to some people.

No matter what they are saying,
they use the plural form of the word.
Every.Single.Time.
I've seen this:
"lol you're such a cute freshmen!"
EN SERIO?!
ONLY use the word "freshmen" if you are referring to multiple freshies.
I know the words SOUND the same

...but they're not.
If you are talking about a whole
CLASS of freshmen,
you would say "freshman class."

Why?

"Freshman" is modifying the word "class,"
and is therefore singular.
definitely
NOT "definately."
...#dassit.

EXTRAS...
Full transcript