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Ethos, Pathos, Logos

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by

Eli Baker

on 23 October 2014

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Transcript of Ethos, Pathos, Logos

Ethos, Pathos, Logos
Ethos, pathos, and logos are three types of writing categories used in an persuasive speech or writing. They are also known as the three main forms of rhetoric writing by Aristotle.
Pathos
The appeal to the emotions of an audience. It is common to use visual aids to invoke strong emotional responses. You can also have a strong speaker to tell a story. This often follows the what life could be like to how it actually is statement.
How/when to use them
You use pathos, ethos, and logos when trying to persuade someone on a certain topic. You can use one, two, or all three forms of communication to get your point across. How you use them depends on which method(s) you think will work best for your audience
Assignment
Rap lyrics on Trial article
Identify all the parts of Ethos, Logos, and pathos in the Article
Ethos
The credibility of your source or topic. Ethos is used to convince the audience you know what you talking about. You can also use credible sources to show an experts opinion on your topic.
Logos
The appeal to logic, based on facts and reason. Logos uses factual or agreed upon information. It often follows an "if, then" statement, if this were true, then wouldn't this also be true?
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