Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

algfjkakfafhls

No description
by

Shyam Kataria

on 21 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of algfjkakfafhls

Park Ranger Work Park rangers are responsible for natural and cultural resource management, public safety and basically protecting Canada's parks. Which means they look after the parks and make sure everything is running smoothly. They are like the police for parks. Duties may include patrolling campgrounds, ticketing violators for various infractions or conducting search and rescue operations. However, the primary function of a park ranger is to protect the natural resources and property of the park and to ensure the safety of visitors. - they make sure people don't litter
- don't pollute the water
- don't camp on the park
- they watch for avalanches, floods, fires
- protect the wild animals
- research on the animals in the park for scientists
- collecting fees
- directing parking
- controlling traffic
- conducting guided tours for the public Working conditions 40 hours a week, but remain on-call for emergencies. Include evenings and weekends, especially during the summer months. There are usually a group of park rangers that have different locations in the park. Supervisor. May have to deal with extreme weather conditions. floods, fires, bugs, wild animals. Qualifications - interest in nature, animals, ecosystem, etc,
- like the summer
- meeting tourists (good people skills)
- Leadership skills
- calm in emergency situations
- drivers, boat lisence
- firearms safety training
- have to like meeting new people from all over
groundskeeper
equipment operator
maintenance worker
lifeguard
Animal Services Worker
Biologist
Coast Guard
Conservation Officer
Detective
Ecologist
Environmental Tech
Forest Firefighter
Forester
Forestry Technician
Outdoor Guide
Paramedic
Parking Enforcement Officer
Police Officer
Private Investigator
Security Guard
Wildlife Technician Park Ranger = Provincial parks
Park Warden = National parks Preparation/Education For park warden minimum is a university degree in science or natural resources. Degrees in areas such as forest management, conservation, and environmental studies are also applicable to this field. Educational requirements for park rangers vary by province. A common minimum is a college diploma in renewable resource management or a similar subject. Courses in law enforcement are also helpful. Competition for this job is pretty stiff. You can gain valuable experience by doing seasonal work in a national or provincial park. Also volunteering is a must. contact your local park about training. Employment Working for a manager/supervisor

Will work up to higher level Salary/Rewards 1. Seasonal Park Ranger: $10k to $30k

2. Full-Time Park Ranger: $30k to $50k

3. Assistant Chief Park Ranger: $45k to $55k

4. Chief Park Warden / Ranger: $50k to $70k Average wage: $45k Benefits Include dental, vision, and health insurance Related Fields Whats special about becoming a Park Ranger? You get to meet new people and learn something everyday Be out in the nature You get to see Canada's beautiful and diverse wildlife How to get the job Research, volunteer, be motivated, and keep trying Parks Canada dropped the historical designation of warden for most of its national parks field staff, replaced it with a more benign title. the national park title of “Warden” has recently been restricted to those who only perform law enforcement duties. Park Rangers have been protecting parks across Canada for a very long time
Full transcript