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The Tragedy of Macbeth

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mac beth

on 1 December 2014

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Transcript of The Tragedy of Macbeth

Macbeth
Lady Macbeth
Three Witches
Banquo
King Duncan
Donalbain
Malcolm
Lennox
Captain
Ross
Angus
Servant
Macduff
Fleance
Porter
Old Man
The Murderers
Hecate
Lord
First Apparition
Second Apparition
Third Apparition
Lady Macduff
Son
English Doctor
Gentlewoman
Menteith
Caithness
Seyton
Siward
Young Siward
- Power:
Definition:
Having the ability to influence others and do something in a particular way
Context:
For Macbeth and his wife, murder was used to obtain power. Their power eventually led them to becoming corrupt and made Macbeth paranoid, eventually leading to their demise.
- Revenge:
Definition:
The action of inflicting hurt or harm on someone for an injury or wrong suffered at their hands
Context:
Macduff plans revenge after hearing news that his wife and children died at the hands of assassins hired by Macbeth.
- Supernatural:
Definition:
An abnormal event/manifestation beyond scientific understanding and laws of nature.
Context:
Macbeth seeing Banquo's ghost and seeing a flying dagger pointing towards King Duncan's room; are two supernatural events occurring in the play. Obviously, the witches are abnormal manifestations, too. Supernatural themes are the driving force behind the story because the witches are the ones who orchestrated the whole affair.
- Time:
Definition:
The indefinite progress of existence and events.
Context:
Time is represented a lot because each act shown by the characters, are all done thinking in the future. For example, the prophecy telling Macbeth that he is going to become Thane of Cawdor, and eventually, the King of Scotland, he plans everything he can do to become the next King.
- Violence
Definition:
Behavior involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something.
Context:
Macbeth is a very violent play. Most scenes are exempt from the play, but are very gruesomely detailed and most acts contain somebody dying one way or another. First we hear about Macbeth slaying his enemies from their navels to their chops. Then we have the murder of the King, Banquo, Macduff's family, Lady Macbeth's suicide, and lastly, Macbeth dies too.


Act 1
Scene 1
Three witches appear out of lightning and thunder in Scotland, they make plans to meet with Macbeth upon the heath after his battle
Macbeth, being the main character of the story, is also the tragic hero of this Shakespearean play. He is a man of great respect but as the story evolves, Macbeth starts to act selfish and becomes crazier. Power corrupts him. His external conflict was his own wife, Lady Macbeth. He is very easily manipulated by his wife, Lady Macbeth, because she was easily able to get him to kill the king once again after declaring to her that he wouldn't do it. His wrong doings eventually got the best of him, however, and he devolved into a mess, ordering for Banquo and his son to be killed for fear of the prophecy becoming true, and was eventually killed by Macduff
Having fun ruining Macbeth's life, the three witches have a particular role in this play, they embody the supernatural element found in most Shakespeare's plays. They are basically the perpetrators of the whole story, as they created the prophecy that would eventually lead Macbeth to his doom. They are the first characters to appear in the play. Obviously, they are evil, they told Macbeth that he was to become Thane of Cawdor. Further on, they do all sort of supernatural things to predict malific stuff.
Acting as Macbeth's wife, she looks kind, but the evilness invades her when she learns that Macbeth has met the three witches and that he is involved in the prophecy. She persuades her husband to kill King Duncan so they could become King and Queen of Scotland. The prophecy could now become true.
He is the father of both Malcolm and Donalbain. He was a good King for Scotland, however he announced that Malcolm would be his heir to the throne after he passed. Macbeth uses this as an advantage and plans with his wife, Lady Macbeth, to kill him. He gets stabbed while sleeping while staying over at Macbeth's castle. His death allows Macbeth to get promoted to the throne.
Banquo was a loyal friend to Macbeth and was almost a good soldier as he was. The prophecy stated that his sons would become kings one day. Macbeth ordered his death, due to his fear of being outranked by him. Banquo serves as a foil to Macbeth, haunting him as a ghost even after he has been killed.
Fleance is Banquo's son, expected to be named as the king due to the witches' prophecy. When his father is murdered by men hired by Macbeth, he manages to escape, making Macbeth increasingly paranoid.
The murderers were in charge of killing Banquo. Macbeth did everything to convince these murderers that Banquo was their enemy. They were also in charge of killing Fleance, but failed.
Hecate is the queen of witches and we see her angered at her three witches who have not included her in their plan of messing with Macbeth.
Act 1
Characters
Act 2
Act 3
Act 4
Act 5
Themes
Scottish Doctor
An armed head warns Macbeth to beware of Macduff.
A bloody child promises, "None of woman born shall harm Macbeth." Macbeth welcomes this good news and, assuming that Macduff was born the natural way, Macbeth thinks he has nothing to fear.
A child wearing a crown with a tree in his hand. The child promises that Macbeth won't be conquered until Birnam Wood reaches Dunsinane.
Unfortunately, we meet her the day of her death. She is Macduff's wife. Macbeth wanted destabilize Macduff so he sent murderers to kill her and their son.
Duncan’s son and Malcolm’s younger brother.
A Scottish nobleman that threatens Macbeth’s crown and eventually becomes a leader in the war to overthrow Macbeth. The mission is win back the throne for the rightful king, Malcolm, but Macduff also wants refenge for Macbeth’s murder of his wife and son.
A scottish nobleman who eventually turns on Macbeth.
Macbeth's cousin and Scottish nobleman who eventually turns on Macbeth, choosing to go with Malcolm and the English forces.
A scottish nobleman who eventually turns on Macbeth.
A member of Duncan's army who advises Duncan on Macbeth's performance in the war.
Duncan’s eldest son and Prince of Cumberland. He flees to England but comes back later in the play with borrowed troops to fight Macbeth. He bcomes King of Scotland after Macbeth's death.
The porter is a drunken old man that opens the door to Macduff. He hints on the hell like nature of the Macbeth castle.
The Old Man talks with Ross on how the king's murder relates to the unatural things in the world.
An attendant at Macbeth's service.
The lord informs Lennox that Malcom is in England with King Edward. He also informs him that Macduff is heading there too in order to gain their help, hoping to restore balance in Scotland.
He is Macduff's only child and is murdered when trying to defend his mother.
The English Doctor explains to Malcolm and Macduff King Edward's healing powers.When he touches the sick, they start to heal. This foreshadows on how the alliance with british troops will heal Scotland from Macbeth's tyranny.
Characters
* Three Witches
Quotes
"Foul is Fair and fair is fowl" - All witches at once

This quote is a foreshadowing to Macbeth's judgement throught the play
Scene 2
King Duncan's forces have been fighting against Norway and the battle was going south quick. A wounded captain informs the king that Macbeth and Banquo have effectively won the battle. The king then decides that the Thane of Cawdor shall be killed and Macbeth is to take the title. Ross is sent to deliver the news.
Quotes
Characters
* King Duncan
* Malcolm
* Donalbain
* Lennox
* Captain
* Ross
"he unseam'd him from the nave to the chops" - Captain

This quote exemplifies the gory imagery Shakespeare is capable of.
Scene 3
After killing swine and bugging sailors, the witches finally meet Macbeth upon the heath. They name Macbeth as the Thane of Glamis (current title), but also Thane of Cawdor and king! He was not aware of this because Ross had not given him the info yet. He is baffled by the news that he will be king. The witches also predict that Banquo's children will be king.
Quotes
"So foul is fair a day I have not seen" - Macbeth

This line is a callback to the witches' quote from scene 1


Characters
* Macbeth
* Banquo
* Witches
* Ross
* Angus
Act and Scene Summaries
Timeline of Events
Play Review/Opinion
Act 2
Act 3
Act 4
Act 5
Quotes
Characters
Scene 4
* King Duncan
* Lennox
* Malcolm
* Donalbain
* Macbeth
* Banquo
* Ross
* Angus
Duncan learns of the former Thane's execution and is pleased. Once Macbeth arrives to the castle, the King congratulates him and announces that Malcolm will become his heir to the throne. Macbeth realizes that the only thing standing between him and the throne is Malcolm.
"The prince of Cumberland! That is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,
For in my way it lies" - Macbeth

That quote signifies that acbeth is starting to have deeper thoughts about the prophecy

Quotes
Characters
Scene 5
Lady Macbeth has received a letter from Macbeth! It informs her about the witches' prophecy, and how he got the title of Thane of Cawdor. She then makes the decision to convince Macbeth to do whatever he needs to do to get that crown. When Macbeth tells her that the King will be staying over, she mentions that the King will never see tomorrow...
"Under my battlements. Come, you spirits
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
Of direst cruelty." - Lady Macbeth

From this quote, one can see that Lady Macbeth is ready to kill her feminine side so that she can perform the deeds that will get Macbeth crowned as king.
Scene 6
Quotes
* Lady Macbeth
* King Duncan
* Banquo

Characters
* Lady Macbeth
* Macbeth
* Servant
Duncan and his posse arrive at Inverness castle.
Lady Macbeth welcomes them and
Duncan asks to meet with Macbeth
"This guest of summer,
The temple-haunting martlet, does approve,
By his loved mansionry, that the heaven’s breath
Smells wooingly here. No jutty, frieze,
Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
Hath made his pendant bed and procreant cradle.
Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed," - Banquo

Banquo says this to mock Duncan, as he says that the castle is very nice. Banquo replies by saying it's so nice that birds have sex in its cracks.
Scene 7
Quotes
Characters
As the dinner is being set-up, Macbeth ponders around, thinking about consequences that might happen if he murders the king. He then realizes that he won't go through with it, as the king is very virtuous and respected. He declares to Lady Macbeth that he won't go through with the murder. She gets infuriated and assures him that they will be successful, and says he is not a man. He reluctantly agrees to proceedd with the murder, once again proving to be easily manipulated.
* Lady Macbeth
* Macbeth
"But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we’ll not fail. When Duncan is asleep—
Whereto the rather shall his day’s hard journey
Soundly invite him—his two chamberlains" - Lady Macbeth

This is Lady Macbeth's amazing plan to kill the king, easier said than done.
Scene 1
Quotes
Characters
Banquo discusses the prophecy with his son, Fleance. He notices that Macbeth is still not asle and tells him that he had dreams about the witches. Macbeth claims that he hasn't thought about them at all, obviously lying.

After they go their separate ways, Macbeth sees a vision of a dagger with the handle pointing towards his hand, he believes that it's a sign for him to kill Duncan.
* Fleance
* Banquo
* Macbeth
"I go, and it is done. The bell invites me.
Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell
That summons thee to heaven or to hell." - Macbeth

This quote is the last thing said in this scene, it is a turning point in t play because Macbeth has decided to go through with his plan.
Scene 2
After the deed has been done, Macbeth heads back to his room where Lady Macbeth awaits his return. Macbeth is very shaken by the murder and Lady Macbeth tries to settle him down, but that sentiment tn turns to anger as she notices that Macbeth forgot to place the bloodied daggers next to the guards. She goes to do it herself.
Quotes
Quotes
Quotes
"She would have died later anyway. That news
was bound to come someday. Tomorrow, and
tomorrow, and tomorrow. The days creep slowly
along until the end of time. And every day that’s
already happened has taken fools that much
closer to their deaths." -Macbeth

This quote shows that Macbeth doesn't really care about death and really about WHO dies. We realize how much guilt he feels now. He just killed so much people.
Quotes
"Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
But certain issue strokes must arbitrate.
Towards which, advance the war." -Siward

This quote explains that in some cases, violence can not solve solutions, but in this case, violence is the only way of getting what should be given back.
Quotes
"Till Birnam Wood remove to Dunsinane
I cannot taint with fear. What’s the boy Malcolm?
Was he not born of woman?" -Macbeth

This quote tells us that Shakespeare really wants us to think the way the character is thinking.
Quotes
Quotes
"Now he seems too small to be a great king, like a midget trying to wear the robes of a giant." -Angus

This quote is simile to show us that Macbeth doesn't have as much power as before.
Quotes
"Why should I play the Roman fool and die
On mine own sword? Whiles I see lives, the gashes
Do better upon them." - Macbeth

This quote exemplifies that Shakespeare can add ancient history in his plays.
Characters
* Doctor
* Gentlewomen
* Lady Macbeth
Characters
* Menteith
* Caithness
* Angus
* Lennox

Characters
* Macbeth
* Servant
* Seyton
* Doctor
Characters
* Malcolm
* Menteith
* Siward
* Soldiers
* Macduff
Characters
* Macbeth
* Seyton
* Messenger

Characters
* Malcolm
* Siward
* Macduff
Characters
* Macbeth
* Young Siward
* Macduff
* Siward
* Malcolm

Characters
* Macbeth
* Macduff
* Malcolm
* Siward
* Ross
Scene 1
Scene 8
Macduff approaches Macbeth. As Macduff is ready to fight him, Macbeth just doesn't want to kill another innocent person because he knows that the one who can defeat him isn't born from a women. But Macbeth didn't know, Macduff wasn't born from a women. When Macbeth suddenly learned the news, he was shocked and decided to fight even though he knew he would die.
Macbeth dies. Coming back to Scotland, Siward finds out from Ross that his son dies during the battle, but his father isn't mad, because he died as a brave man.
Lastly, Malcolm is crowned King of Scotland.
Scene 7
Macbeth enters the battlefield. While he searches for the men not born from a women, Young Siward approaches him and wants to fight him. Macbeth refuses because he doesn't want to kill anyone anymore. But the child starts fighting anyways. Unfortunately, Young Siward dies.
Macduff reaches the battlefield and searches the murderer of his wife and children. Knowing that Macbeth's soldiers are on both sides; Macduff and Macbeth,Macduff gains more confidence into winning the battle.
"Thou wast born of woman.
But swords I smile at, weapons laugh to scorn,
Brandished by man that’s of a woman born." -Macbeth

This quote proves us that Macbeth fears the man not born from a women.
Scene 6
Malcolm is announcing the start of a new battle. The objective: kill Macbeth and his army!
"Make all our trumpets speak; give them all breath,
Those clamorous harbingers of blood and death." -Macduff

This quote shows the traditional ways of starting a battle with the trumpets, blood and death. Shakespeare wanted to keep the this image clear to his audience.
Scene 5
Scene 4
Scene 2
Scene 3
Quotes
Quotes
Quotes
Characters
Characters
* Macbeth
* Lady Macbeth
* Malcolm
* Donalbain
* Lennox
* Macduff
Characters
Seyton anounces to the King that the English are arriving very close to the castle. Meanwhile, the Queen suicides herself; she jumps off the building. When the King hears the news, he doesn't really care much. We learn after a while, that the Queen had so much guilt in her, that it just overwhelmed everything, so she committed suicide.
Meanwhile, Birnam Wood "reaches" Dunsinane. Macbeth hears the news and is shocked! He now prepares everything for the battle. We also learn that Birnam Wood didn't really reach Dunsinane, the English were just advancing in a strait line to prepare for the attack.
Malcolm says to his men to take a branch and place it in front of him. Therefore, Macbeth will think that Birnam Wood is reaching Dunsinane. Malcolm declares that there will be a battle against Macbeth.

The Scottish doctor was there to help the Macbeth family with their sicknesses. He was called in by the gentlewoman to see Lady Macbeth while she was sleepwalking. He informs Macbeth and the gentle woman that Lady Macbeth isn't sick, she is possessed by her own guilt.
"Do mock their charge with snores. I have drugged their possets,
That death and nature do contend about them,
Whether they live or die." -Lady Macbeth

This is when Lady Macbeth reveals that she had drugged the servants

"Still it cried, “Sleep no more!” to all the house.
“Glamis hath murdered sleep, and therefore Cawdor
Shall sleep no more. Macbeth shall sleep no more.” - Macbeth

This is Macbeth having auditory hallucinations due to what he did, saying that sleep is supposed to be peaceful, where we can forget our worries, not where we can get murdered
* Macbeth
* Lady Macbeth
Scene 3
A porter answers the door, who might it be? Well it so happens to be Macduff and Lennox, who say that the King had asked them to see him in the morning. Macbeth heads to the King's room, and what's this? The king has been murdered? His chamberlains too? Who couldv'e possibly done this? Lady Macbeth faints and Macbeth expresses anger. Malcolm and Donalbain come to the conclusion that they are not safe d run away to England and Ireland, placing suspicion on them
Scene 4
Ross and an Old Man are talking about strange things happening recently. Macduff arrives and informs them that Macbeth has been named King and is heading to Scone to be crowned.
Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!
Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
The Lord’s anointed temple, and stole thence
The life o’ the building! - Macduff

Macduff compares Duncan's body to a Church andthe rst thing has possibly happened, there is no more lord within said church, because he's dead.
"They were suborned.
Malcolm and Donalbain, the king’s two sons,
Are stol'n away and fled, which puts upon them
Suspicion of the deed." - Macduff

This quote means that Macbeth has gotten away with the murder due to the suspicion being placed on the king's sons
* Ross
* Macduff
* Old Man
Scene 1
The Tragedy Of
Banquo wonders to himself, what if the prophecy is true, and if Macbeth became king, maybe his sons also will be. Macbeth and his now-queen enter the room and invite Banquo to a feast. Once they leave, Macbeth mentions that Banquois now the only man he fears, because he has no heir to the throne, and mayb he just made it so that Baquo's sons can eventually become king. Macbeth hires two murderers to kill Banquo and Fleance, to make sure that the prophecy wont be fulfilled for Banquo.
Quotes
Characters
Quotes
Quotes
Quotes
Quotes
Quotes
Characters
Characters
Characters
Characters
Characters
* Banquo
* Macbeth
* Lady Macbeth
* Murderers
"But to be safely thus. Our fears in Banquo
Stick deep, and in his royalty of nature
Reigns that which would be feared. 'Tis much he dares," - Macbeth

This quote is part of his solliloquy, it mentions that there is something noble about Banquo, he is willing to take risks and isn't afraid, and that scares Macbeth, who now considers him a threat
Scene 2
Lady Macbeth asks a servant to fetch Macbeth for her. Macbeth tells her that by killing Duncan, they have only completed a part of their plan, and now he must get rid of Banquo too. He tells her to be nice to Banquo so he feels secure
"We have scorched the snake, not killed it.
She’ll close and be herself whilst our poor malice
Remains in danger of her former tooth." - Macbeth

Macbeth uses a snake as a metaphor to show that they have not finished just yet, and they still have things to do in order for the plan to be complete
* Servant
* Macbeth
* Lady Macbeth
Scene 3
In the woods, the murderers await Banquo and Fleance's passing. They arrive on horses and dismount. The murderers succesfully kill Banquo, but Fleance flees, with Banquo telling him to avenge his death.
"O treachery! Fly, good Fleance, fly, fly, fly!
Thou may ’st revenge —O slave!" - Banquo

Banquo tells this to Fleance as he is dying, so he can one day avenge his father's death
* Banquo
* Three murderers
* Fleance
Scene 4
Macbeth is sitting at his feast, when murderers show up. They inform him that Fleance escaped. He is furious, but nothing can be done. He heads back to his seat... only to find the ghost of Banquo sitting there. Macbeth starts going crazy at thehost that only he can see. Lady Macbeth makes excuses for him and takes him from the table to make him get his act together. He returns to his seat, but Banquo (well, his ghost anyway) reappears again and shocks Macbeth, who goes into a frenzy. His queen makes excuses for him once more and sends his guests out of the room. Macbeth decides to go see the witches again the next day, and resolves to do anything he can to keep his throne.
"Thou canst not say I did it. Never shake thy gory locks at me."

This is Macbeth's reaction to seeing the ghost, saying that he wasnt the one to perform the murder

"It will have blood, they say. Blood will have blood.
Stones have been known to move, and trees to speak." - Macbeth

Macbeth says that the dead has their revenge and unthinkable things have happened in order for the dead to do so
* Banquo (ghost)
* Macbeth
* Lady Macbeth
* Lords
* Murderers
Scene 5
The witches meet with their godess, Hecate, she is furious at them for having fooled around with Macbeth without her knowing, let alone her permission. She says she will now take over and supervise the witches. They know that Macbeth will be coming the next day, and that they must create visions to mess with him and give him a false sense of security
"He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear
His hopes 'bove wisdom, grace, and fear.
And you all know, security
Is mortals' chiefest enemy."

The witches discuss what to do with Macbeth when he comes the next day
* Hecate
* The 3 Witches
Scene 6
Lennox and a lord discuss about the kingdom, and how Banquo's murder has been blamed on Fleance, although they both suspect Macbeth of being the actual perpetrator. The lord says that Macduff is gone to England to find Malcolm and ask for help to defeat Macbeth. Macbeth retaliates by preparing for war.
"Thither Macduff
Is gone to pray the holy king upon his aid
To wake Northumberland and warlike Siward,
That by the help of these—with Him above
To ratify the work—we may again
Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights,
Free from our feasts and banquets bloody knives" - Lord

The Lord explains that Macduff is getting help from everyone he can, and once Macbeth is taken down, everybody can once again live their lives
* Lord
* Lennox

Lady Macbeth's caretaker. She asks the Scottish Doctor to cure Lady Macbeth's sleepwalking since she has heard dark secrets from it.
A scottish nobleman who eventually turns on Macbeth.
A scottish nobleman who eventually turns on Macbeth.
Macbeth's armorer.
Servant
A man at Macbeth's service who informs him on the arrival of the English army.
Many of the play's Scenes take place at the same time, this is a timeline putting these scenes in order. Only the first 3 acts seem to have these kinds of overlapping scenes because the last two Acts are very fast paced
Cedric Bechette-Coté
Sarah-Jane Aupin
Kateri Moreau
Carolane Paquin-Piché

Act 1
Act 3
Act 2
Act 5
Act 4
Scene 1
Scene 2
Scene 3
Scene 4
Scene 5
Scene 6
Scene 7
Scene 1
Scene 2
Half of scene 2 takes place during the events of the king's murder
Scene 1 and Scene 2 take place at the same time, while Macbeth is in battle and the witches are discussing
Scene 3
Scene 4
Scene 1
Scene 2
The end of Scene 1 crosses with Scene 2, as Lady Macbeth asks for a servant to go get Macbeth in Scene 2, who is still in the events of Scene 1
General of the English army in the battle against Macbeth. Also Duncan's brother and Malcom's uncle.
Scene 3
Scene 4
Scene 5
The witches know that Macbeth will go see them the next day, therefore they are watching Macbeth during Scene 4
Scene 6
Scene 1
Scene 2
Scene 3
Scene 1
Scene 2
Scene 3
Scene 4
Scene 6
Scene 7
Scene 5
All scenes in this act are fairly straightforward
Siward's son. He confronts Macbeth during the battle to overthrow him, but is killed Macbeth's sword.
In scene 5, Malcolm's army approaches the castle, while Macbeth is told that an army is head his way in scene 6
Cedric
Monologue Analysis
Theme Quotes
Power
"Come, you spirits
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
Of direst cruelty!" 1.5.30-33
"I am in blood
Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o'er.
Strange things I have in head, that will to hand,
Which must be acted ere they may be scanned." 3.4.143-147
Lady Macbeth is ready to sacrifice her woman qualities in order to rise to power.
Macbeth is so overwhelmed by power that he puts guilt aside and kills whatever is in his way. His sense of right and wrong is completely gone as he doesn't even think before his actions.
Revenge
"Cut short all intermission. Front to front
Bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself.
Within my sword’s length set him; if he ’scape,
Heaven forgive him too." 4.3.240-243
Macduff swears to avenge his family by killing the tyrannous Macbeth.
Supernatural
Banquo states that the witches look nonhuman and he is questioning their existence.
"What are these
So withered and so wild in their attire,
That look not like th' inhabitants o' th' Earth,
And yet are on ’t?" 1.3.39-42
"'Tis said they eat each other." 2.4.18
Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To feeling as to sight? or art thou but
A dagger of the mind, a false creation,
Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
I see thee yet, in form as palpable
As this which now I draw.
Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going;
And such an instrument I was to use.
Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
Which was not so before. There's no such thing:

It is the bloody business which informs
Thus to mine eyes. Now o'er the one halfworld
Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth,
Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
And take the present horror from the time,
Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives:
Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives.
[A bell rings]
I go, and it is done; the bell invites me.
Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell
That summons thee to heaven or to hell.

Macbeth Act 2 Scene 1
In this monologue spoken by Macbeth, he sees an apparition of a dagger in front of his eyes, pointing him towards Duncan's room. "Heat-oppressed" brain refers to his mental state after being pressured by Lady Macbeth after convincing him to go ahead with the murder. The vision of the dagger acts like a guide for him. The line witchcraft celebrates shows that Macbeth thinks the dagger is a vision given to him by the witches as a result of the prophecy. The bell then rings, giving Macbeth the final push as to what he is about to do, and he utters the last two lines of the monologue, showing that Duncan will be either in Heaven or Hell by the time he is finished with him.
The old man compares the horses eating each other to Duncan's murder since both events are unexplainable.
To be thus is nothing;
But to be safely thus.--Our fears in Banquo
Stick deep; and in his royalty of nature
Reigns that which would be fear'd: 'tis much he dares;
And, to that dauntless temper of his mind,
He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour
To act in safety. There is none but he
Whose being I do fear: and, under him,
My Genius is rebuked; as, it is said,
Mark Antony's was by Caesar. He chid the sisters
When first they put the name of king upon me,
And bade them speak to him: then prophet-like

They hail'd him father to a line of kings:
Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
Thence to be wrench'd with an unlineal hand,
No son of mine succeeding. If 't be so,
For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
For them the gracious Duncan have I murder'd;
Put rancours in the vessel of my peace
Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
Given to the common enemy of man,
To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings!
Rather than so, come fate into the list.
And champion me to the utterance!
Time
"Come what come may,
Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." 1.3.153-154
Macbeth: Act 3 Scene 1
Macbeth decides to not lift a finger on the King and let time control the prophecy.
"Thy letters have transported me beyond
This ignorant present, and I feel now
The future in the instant." 1.5.47-49
Lady Macbeth forgets the present and dreams of a future as Queen, almost tasting it.
Violence
"The very firstlings of my heart shall be
The firstlings of my hand." 4.1.153-154
Macbeth will trust his instincts and act according to them. In this case, he says he should of killed Macduff when he had the chance.
In this soliloquy by Macbeth, we learn that he has a fear of Banquo. He says that Banquo has the qualities of a man that is to be feared (wisdom that doth guide his valour, acts in safety, dauntless temper). He compares what might happen to him with Mark Antony and Octavius Caesar. Caesar defeated Antony in an acient civil war in Rome. In this case, Antony is Macbeth and Banquo is Octavius. Then hetalks about the prophecy. They say he would be the father to a bunch of his descendants, all being kings. He believes that what he has done by killing the King has made it so that Banquo's descendants can become kings. At the end of his soliloquy, the line "Rather than so, come fate into the list. And champion me to the utterance!" means that he will do anything to keep his throne.
Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,
As the weird women promised, and I fear
Thou played’st most foully for ’t. Yet it was said
It should not stand in thy posterity,
But that myself should be the root and father
Of many kings. If there come truth from them—
As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine—
Why, by the verities on thee made good,
May they not be my oracles as well,
And set me up in hope? But hush, no more.
This is a shorter soliloquy in the play, but a notable one that serves different purposes. Firstly, it serves as a reminder of the witches' prophecy to the audience, saying that Macbeth is now the thane of Cawdor, and is also the king now. "Thou play'st most foully for 't." is a line that means that Banquo suspects Macbeth of being the one who killed theKing to get what he wanted, and he is right. mentions that since Macbeth got his part of the prophecy, maybe his part will also become real. The line "But hush no more" means that he was muttering to himself and stopped talking before others showed up.

Banquo: Act 3 Scene 1
Scene 1
Scene 2
Scene 3
At first, I couldn't understand anything due to the language used in the play. There are so many metaphors, and extended metaphors even, it's hard to keep track of what's happening. But as we learned how to analyze the play and reading the side by side comparison, it becomes apparent that the play is very clever. It uses the notion of power to show how an overconfident man is eventually led to his death by it. It is one of Shakespeare's darker plays and has a strong lead who is a good example of a dramatic hero, who starts with nobility and ends up degraded and eventually dead. The story isn't too complicated and appeals to everybody, which is why Shakespeare's writings are accessible. I thought I would be bored with this unit but I really wasn't in the end.
A servant comes up to Macbeth and informs him that a battle is about to start. Macbeth is ready to fight because he knows that only a man not born from a women could conquer him. He wasn't afraid!
Macbeth spoke a few minutes to his wife's doctor. He wanted to get some news on her health. Unfortunately, as the doctor explained to Macbeth, he couldn't do anything to cure her visions.
Movie/Book Comparison
Some noblemen are talking about a King who has lost his power and trust; Macbeth. Fighting with Macbeth would be useless because he doesn't deserve it. Malcolm is the true King and can but their country back in order.
Poetic Devices
Metaphor
on a dark stormy night, Macbeth has some questions about his future for the witches, and gets some information by apparitions in the cauldron. He gets warned to beware of Macduff, a bloody child promises, "None of woman born shall harm Macbeth." Macbeth welcomes this good news and, assuming Macduff was born the natural way, Macbeth thinks he has nothing to fear. A child wearing a crown with a tree in his hand promises that Macbeth won't be conquered until Birnam Wood marches to Dunsinane. Lennox tells Macbeth that Macduff has definitely run away to England. Macbeth says that from now on, he is going to act immediately on whatever thought enters his mind,
“O full of scorpions is my mind, my dear wife!” 3.2.48
“Letting ‘I dare not’ wait upon ‘I would’,
Like the poor cat i’ the adage?”1.7.44-45
Simile
Personification
“Sleep that knits up the raveled sleeve of care,”
2.2.37
Lady Macbeth's gentlewomen got a Scottish doctor to cure Lady Macbeth. She was sleepwalking, but at the same time, she talked and felt so much guilt. She kept on washing her hands to take off the "blood". Lastly, the doctor can't do anything about it, he advise the gentlewomen to get a priest to cure her.
Hyperbole
“All the
perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand” 5.1.47-48
"What’s done cannot be undone." -Lady Macbeth

This quote comes back to the beginning of the movie where Macbeth murders innocent people. Lady Macbeth says that we can't come back to the past.
Euphemism
"Is he dispatch'd?" 3.4.15.
Alliteration
Starting with the book cover; it looks like crap! Secondly, Shakespearean language is HARD! So in the first scenes of the book, can you imagine how I felt the Shakespearean language coming through my veins? It was tough to get along with words and phrases, especially. If you don't understand a word in a phrase, you won't understand the sentence. But I got used to it, for example: thou means you, art means are, or 'tis means it is. Thank God the modern version of the play was there online. But the books, ouch! Anyways, I appreciated the fact that Shakespeare didn't do something romantic just like in secondary three with Romeo & Juliet. This play was more about power. I never took the time to think about power and this unit helped me understand it more. I was surprised to read that leading up towards the end of the story, the main character dies. This is particularly rare in stories, especially when the title is named after the main character, and then he dies! This was very unexpected, and I enjoyed the leading up to this point.
Last few words about my opinion; Did you know that the word assassin comes from Shakespeare?
Kateri
-Macbeth
-Three witches
-Lennox
"And yet wouldst wrongly win." 1.5.20
Rhythm
"Double, double toil and trouble" 4.1.10
Rhyme
"When the hurlyburly's done,
When the battle's lost and won." 1.1.3-4
"Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep”—the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the raveled sleave of care." 2.2.35-37

As we move on with monologues, in the movie, we hear the character speaking in his/her mind, but no lips are moving. In the script we can only imagine how the character is showing his monologue.
This brings me to my next point, imagination is always in a novel. When we read something with no images beside, we have to reflect on the actions written. In a film, everything is different; the actions are shown clearly, and there is no space for imagination. When you think of this, Shakespeare was a guy of GREAT imagination, this is maybe why he wrote plays instead of producing movies.
At least in the movie all the main elements were included. In some books where movies are produced after, some scenes are taken off or others are randomly added.
Repetition
Lady Macduff is lamenting to Ross that her husband has run away, which, sure makes him look suspicious. A messenger enters advising her to flee with her children. Since she's innocent, she sees no reason to leave. Macduff's son retorts, is stabbed, and then dies, leaving the murderers to pursue mom.
Irony
“Had I but died an hour before this chance,
I had lived a blessed time;” 2.3.90-91
Sarah-Jane
Macduff wants him and Malcolm to whip out their swords and fight like "men" against the good-for-nothing Macbeth. But Malcolm is not sure to trust Macduff. So, Macduff, Malcolm and ten thousand Englishmen at their backs get ready to take Scotland back. Ross anounces that Macduff's family has been murdered. Macduff blames himself for leaving, but Malcolm recommends that Macduff take his own advice and get his feelings out by committing to action instead of thought.
Comparing the Macbeth script(book) and the movie, we can easily see the difference between limited imagination and a screen. Limited imagination is used in plays because the author writes the staging movements and the ambiance in the script. In a movie, we just see it.
-Lady Macduff
-Ross
-messenger

-Malcolm
-Macduff
-Doctor
-Ross
Important quotes act 4
"Double, double, toil and trouble; / Fire burn and caldron bubble,"
"But yet I'll make assurance double sure, / And take a bond of fate,"
"The flighty purpose never is o'ertook / Unless the dead go with it,"
"No boasting like a fool; / This deed I'll do before this purpose cool,"
"A good and virtuous nature may recoil / In an imperial charge,"
"Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell,"
"At one fell swoop?"
Carolane
At first, Shakespear's writing wasn't something that interested me. A way of writing which not much of us are used to, and I founded it very complicated to understand. I had to re-read more than once some sentances. But by taking time to go over it and reading the modern version, I ended up understanding and learning alot of things. Seeing what can strong power do to your brain is very interesting. I like how there is alot of imagery which makes us think alot while reading. I wouldn't read something else by shakespear since it takes alot of work to understand alot of things, but it was still very interesting to go over once.
Macbeth was definitely a literary challenge for me, but I enjoyed reading this Shakespearean blood bath. Personally, I would of never picked this play as one of my reading choices, but the hidden humor and the image of how tyranny is often its own enemy won me over. What I liked about The Tragedy of Macbeth is that there are plenty of hidden meanings behind statements that are sometimes hard to pick up. You could read this play a hundred times if you could and still find new things throughout the text. The thing is, once you find these hidden meanings, you discover how Shakespeare created magic with words and how his play is complex. Shakespeare also tries to let the reader interpret the story by creating statements that have multiple meanings and the reader can decide which one he picks, which I love. Finally, I'd like to congratulate him for making me love his main character, Macbeth, from beginning to end. I never thought I'd liked to hear murderer's story so much... Props to him.
Characters
Characters
Characters
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