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Avant-The Five Good Emperors

The five good emperors of Rome from Nerva to Marcus Aurelius
by

Brian Avant

on 29 November 2011

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Transcript of Avant-The Five Good Emperors

The Five Good Emperors Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus, and Marcus had no need of praetorian cohorts, or of countless legions to guard them, but were defended by their own good lives, the good-will of their subjects, and the attachment of the senate.-Machiavelli None were sons. All were adopted. Emperor Nerva Good intentions but weak. Couldn't control the army. Died 15 months after becoming emperor. Emperor Trajan Built buildings all over Rome Flavian Market Was a general in the Roman Army. Expanded the Empire Good leader for 19 years. Emperor Hadrian He loved the Greeks. He tried to make Athens the cultural capital. Made the army better but rarely used them Built Hadrian's Wall Built the Pantheon. Who else could build Hadrian's Wall? Some kid named Timmy? Got in 21 good years. Emperor Antoninus Pius From what we can tell, he was a very good Emperor. Few records remain about him. Ruled for 22 years. Emperor Marcus Aurelius Noble and wise ruler Many wars with great successes. Wrote books of philosophy. But, then He broke the chain. Put his son in charge. Commodus Thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules. He was an athlete, but not a thinker. Power was too much for him. Cruel and spiteful. Fought as a gladiator. Strangled by his wrestling partner while he took a bath. First Emperor elected by the Senate.
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