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Timeline: Georgia Headright System

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by

Kimberly Garner

on 26 September 2012

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Transcript of Timeline: Georgia Headright System

Created by: K. Garner
Crawford Long MS Georgia Headright System
How much land did they receive?

These heads of household would declare his honesty and integrity and pay a small filing fee. This made them eligible for free land: 200 acres plus another 50 acres for each family member and slave, up to 1000 acres. Lets Check out the TIMELINE of EVENTS!

Directions: Follow along on your paper to place the following events. What was The Georgia Headright system?


This system for dispersing new lands acquired at the end of the Revolutionary War. Every head of household (usually a white male) had the right to land. What was the purpose of the Headright System in Georgia?

To encourage new settlers to move in to populate and develop. June 7, 1777

Georgia passes its first headright law, allowing the leader of the executive branch to give land to individuals to "strengthen the state." No land is granted under this law. September 16, 1777


Georgia amends the headright provision to also create a land sales office. No land is granted or sold under this act. January 23, 1780

Georgia passes a headright law offering families 200 acres of land, plus 50 acres per person, to migrate to Georgia. Some land is surveyed to be granted, but none is actually granted under this law. February 17, 1783



Georgia passes a new headright law. This law recognizes the grants made under the 1780 headright law October 22, 1783

First of the Georgia headright grants is made. May 29, 1784


A general brawl erupts at the headright distribution for Franklin and Washington County. July 15, 1784

Because of the huge amount of fraud Georgia's Executive Council suspends the granting of land in Franklin and Washington Counties February 22, 1785

The General Assembly addresses the headright issues with a new act establishing a set procedure for granting headright land by delegating the authority to grant land to land courts in each county December 21, 1789

The Georgia Assembly, unsuccessful in dealing with the headright issue, agrees to sell land to the South Carolina Yazoo Company, The Virginia Yazoo Company and the Tennessee Yazoo Land Company. The deal, selling some 20 million acres falls through. January 7, 1795 Governor George Mathews signs into law a bill that agrees to sell almost 40 million acres to speculators at the starting the Yazoo Land Fraud. This corrupt deal led to the downfall of many popular politicians of the day. January 7, 1795

Governor George Mathews signs into law a bill that agrees to sell almost 40 million acres to speculators at the starting the Yazoo Land Fraud. This corrupt deal led to the downfall of many popular politicians of the day. February 18, 1796

Under pressure from reformists led by U.S. Senator and Revolutionary War hero James Jackson, the Yazoo Land Act is rescinded February 21, 1796


At the state capital in Louisville, Georgia's reform politicians burn every copy of the Yazoo Land Act except for one sent to General George Washington. It is the only known copy of the act to survive May 11, 1803


Land Lottery Act passed by Georgia legislature. Georgia needed to divest new lands ceded by the Creek, and did not want to return to the corrupt headright practice. A lottery to be held in 1805 that gave advantages to veterans was chosen.
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