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Daedalus and Icarus Project

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Kristin K

on 24 June 2013

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Transcript of Daedalus and Icarus Project

Daedalus and Icarus
Daedalus and Icarus
by: Deborah, Kristin, and Sammy
Short Summary
A crafty man named Daedalus came up with a new idea to escape his much hated exile. He decided to put wings together and fly away from the island of Crete. To do so, he used feathers and wax. Much care was put into it; he even made them look like a bird's natural wing with the placement of the feathers. His son, Icarus, was on the island with him as well, but he caused much trouble. When Daedalus finished these wings, he instructed his son what to do and not to do with them. He told him about the Golden Mean: to not fly to high or he'll be weighed down by the wings, and not to fly to high or else the sun will scorch him-he must fly in the perfect middle. After that, they started flying. Daedalus was first, followed by Icarus. Then, something horrible occurred: Icarus became distracted by his desire to reach the sky. He flew too high and the wax that held the wings together melted. He flew down into the water. Later, he was found dead despite his father's frantic shouting and searching. Icarus was buried soon after.
by Deborah, Kristin, and Sammy
A crafty man named Daedalus came up with a new idea to escape his much hated exile. He decided to put wings together and fly away from the island of Crete. To do so, he used feathers and wax. Much care was put into it; he even made them look like a bird's natural wing with the placement of the feathers. His son, Icarus, was on the island with him as well, but he caused much trouble. When Daedalus finished these wings, he instructed his son what to do and not to do with them. He told him about the Golden Mean: to not fly to high or he'll be weighed down by the wings, and not to fly to high or else the sun will scorch him-he must fly in the perfect middle. After that, they started flying. Daedalus was first, followed by Icarus. Then, something horrible occurred: Icarus became distracted by his desire to reach the sky. He flew too high and the wax that held the wings together melted. He flew down into the water. Later, he was found dead despite his father's frantic shouting and searching. Icarus was buried soon after.
The Story
Analysis of Poetic Devices
Alliteration: (Lines 213-214) "...ales, ab alto...aera..."
Effect: It uses the rising "a" sound to emphasize on the height of the tower.
Anaphora: (Lines 231-233) "'Icare...Icare...Icare'"
Effect: It creates the mood for this scene as Daedalus hopelessly tries to call for his son that is gone.
Simile: (Lines 191- 192)"...sīc rūstica quondam fistula disparibus paulātim surgit avēnīs..."
Effect: This helps get a better understanding on what the feathers look like.
Foreshadowing: (Lines 208-211)"...pariter praecepta volandī tradit et ignōtās umerīs accommodat ālās. inter opus monitūsque genae maduēre senīlēs, et patriae tremuēre manūs..."
Effect: This device helped give doubt and nervousness to the reader. It gives the reader a feeling of failure having seen the dad's hands trembling and the wings being "unknown" to humans.
Imagery: (Lines 181-191)"nam pōnit in ordine pennās ā minimā cœptās, longam breviōre sequentī, ut clīvō crēvisse putēs:"
Effect: This just helps create a picture in the the reader's mind to show what the wings look like.
Dactylic Hexameter
(Line 183) "...longumque...exsilium."
(Line 190) "...longum..."

The spondee on both longum's helps emphasize on Daedalus' long exile.

(Lines 198-200) "flāvam modo pollice cēram mollībat lūsūque suō mīrābile patris impediēbat opus.

The numbers of spondees here helps emphasize on the foreshadowing effect here. The quote is talking about how Icarus is interrupting on his father's marvelous work.
I Believe I Can Fly by R. Kelly
Imagine by John Lennon
Free as a Bird by The Beatles
Listen to Your Heart by Roxette
Lessons Learned by Carrie Underwood
Music
1st Part
When Carrie mentions the part of every tear
that had to fall from her eyes from the mistakes
she made, that links back to Daedalus crying before
he let Icarus fly, "Inter.... non iterum repetenda!"
2nd Part
When Carrie mentions in the first and
second lines of her songs about some of
the mistakes that she had made and all the chance the chances she threw away by making those mistakes. This relates to Daedalus's mistake of focusing too much on making his wings instead of
focusing on his son, Icarus, "Puer Icarus
una stabat et, ignarus sua.... opus." Daedalus threw away his chance of taking care of his son and being responsible for his son. Icarus on the other hand, was too distracted by the feathers and the wax.
3rd Part
Carrie mentioning everyday she
wondered how she'd get through the night
and regretting everything she has done
that relates to Daedalus cursing and
regretting everything he has done.
Like Carrie it made Daedalus's life
harder and as much as he wanted to redo
the past, he couldn't, "Pennas aspexit in
undis.... condidit. Etellus a nomine
repulti."
Moral of the Story
Pay attention to the ones that you love.
Who is to blame for the tragedy, Daedalus or Icarus?
Daedalus is to blame for the tragic ending because he was the one who cried before he sent his son off to fly. This foreshadowed that Daedalus knew something bad would happen to Icarus. "Inter.. non iterum repetenda!" Daedalus is also the one to blame for the tragic ending because he was too busy focusing on making the wings instead of paying attention to his son and acknowledging his son's existence. "Puer Icarus una stabat et, ignarus sua.. Opus."
Connection to another story where one mistake leads to a tragic ending:
The story of Daedalus and Icarus relates to Adam and Eve. In Adam and Eve, Eve made a mistake by picking out a fruit (apple) from the snake when God told her not to. Her punishment led to herself and Adam becoming mortal, as well as facing the burden of having children.
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