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Moonlight

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aadil hussain

on 7 October 2013

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Transcript of Moonlight

Moonlight
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Figurative Language

Sequence of Events
Talks about the moon in the sky.
Shows how the clouds mask and reveal it.
Tells how the moonlight changes the way things look and seem
Says how that's an illusion and that everything is really the same.
Then questions and asks if what we can see is really the only thing to see.
Facts vs Fiction, Purpose and Mood
The purpose is to inform and slightly persuade.
The Poem, "Moonlight"
By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Presented by Aadil Hussain
The rhyme scheme throughout the poem is is A, B, A, B
A
B
B
Rhyme Scheme
An example of a simile in this poem is, "Supreme as Empress of the Night" where the poet is comparing how the moon is as as big and powerful as an empress.
Another example is, "As a pale phantom with a lamp" where the author compares the moon to a phantom that has been lit up with a light.
Rhyme Scheme

Similes
Exact Rhyme

Until at last, serene and proud
In all the splendour of her light,
She walks the terraces of cloud,
Supreme as Empress of the Night.
Exact Rhyme
Exact Rhyme
Every stanza in this poem has two pair of exact rhymes, here's an example of one of the stanzas.
The author starts out by telling us that all houses are haunted.
All things are changed. One mass of shade,
The elm-trees drop their curtains down;
By palace, park, and colonnade
I walk as in a foreign town.

The very ground beneath my feet
Is clothed with a diviner air;
While marble paves the silent street
And glimmers in the empty square.

Illusion! Underneath there lies
The common life of every day;
Only the spirit glorifies
With its own tints the sober gray.

In vain we look, in vain uplift
Our eyes to heaven, if we are blind;
We see but what we have the gift
Of seeing; what we bring we find.
As a pale phantom with a lamp
Ascends some ruin's haunted stair,
So glides the moon along the damp
Mysterious chambers of the air.

Now hidden in cloud, and now revealed,
As if this phantom, full of pain,
Were by the crumbling walls concealed,
And at the windows seen again.

Until at last, serene and proud
In all the splendor of her light,
She walks the terraces of cloud,
Supreme as Empress of the Night.

I look, but recognize no more
Objects familiar to my view;
The very pathway to my door
Is an enchanted avenue.

As a pale phantom with a lamp
Ascends some ruin's haunted stair,
So glides the moon along the damp
Mysterious chambers of the air.
A
Imagery
There is imagery in almost every stanza in this poem.
Here are some examples
"White marble paves the silent street" conjures an image of a white street.
"Now hidden in cloud, and now revealed," brings an image of cloads slowly moving accross the sky hiding and revealing the moon.
Direct Metaphor
"Pathway to my door is an enchanted avenue."
This metaphor is saying how a familiar thing like his door is now different, an enchanted avenue.
"The ground beneath my feet is clothed with a diviner air.
This is saying how the ground is now different.
Rhythm
The rhyme scheme of the poem also gives it rhythm.
Alliteration
An instance of alliteration in this poem is, "palace, park"
Another instance is, "silent street"
Diction
The author used the word enchanted in, "The very pathway to my door
Is an enchanted avenue." instead of something like different to convey a feeling of something mystical and magical
Additionally, each line has exactly 8 syllables making it follow a rhythm
The view with moonlight causes the author to question what we see in reality. This fuels the end of the poem.
It informs us about how he sees things with the moonlight shining down and slightly persuades us to question what we see and look carefully.
The mood the author creates is strong, smooth, slightly ominous and powerful.
He creates this mood by describing the moon as an empress and how it causes everything to appear different.
Fact: "Now hidden in cloud, and now revealed," The moon in real life is always being covered and uncovered by the moon.
Opinion: "Our eyes to heaven, if we are blind" He believes that we are blind to everything other than what we want to see.
"As a pale phantom with a lamp
Ascends some ruin's haunted stair,
So glides the moon along the damp
Mysterious
chambers of the air."
In this stanza, the poet uses the word mysterious. It shows how the night can be different from what we think and how the moon shines light onto it .
Implied Metaphor
In the whole poem, the author is saying how moonlight is a thing that shows and reveals itself, as well as showing us other things.
In the stanza, "The very ground beneath my feet
Is clothed with a diviner air;
White marble paves the silent street
And glimmers in the empty square,"
Longfellow implies that the moonlight on shining on the street is the marble paved street he sees.
Internal rhyme
An example of internal approximate rhyme is, terraces and empress in the stanza,
"Until at last, serene and proud
In all the splendour of her light,
She walks the terraces of cloud,
Supreme as Empress of the Night."
Personification
In the line,"She walks the terraces of cloud," the poet gives the moon the human characteristic of walking.
In the lines, "The very ground beneath my feet
Is clothed with a diviner air;", the poet gives the ground the human characteristic of being clothed.
Tone
The tone of the poem is mysterious and calm.
The poet conveys mysteriousness buy using words like mysterious and haunted.
He conveys calmness by using words like serene, proud and enchanted.
Allusion
The story makes a reference to the Empress of the Night. This name was also given to Catherine the Great for her power and achievements.
Full transcript