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Transpiration Lab.

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by

Brittany Carter

on 15 March 2013

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Transcript of Transpiration Lab.

Transpiration The Lab Procedure: The Variables:

Independent Variable: The light, what is being changed.

Dependent Variable: The plant, what is changing due to the independent variable. Results 4 pansy plants,
4 small plastic bags,
4 rubber bands,
A light,
A ruler,
A scale,
& A marker. Purpose:
The purpose of this lab was
to discover the effect that
different environmental
factors have on transpiration
rate. The environmental factor
we chose to test was amount
of light. Transpiration Lab Four pansies were obtained and then de flowered. The root ball was then wrapped completely with a plastic bag and then tied with a rubber band making sure only the leaves of the plant were exposed. The plants were then labeled A, B, C, and D and then weighed to the nearest tenth of a gram. Plant A was then placed in the middle of the classroom, central to the window and away from the lamp. Plant B was placed in the dark cabinet so it was not exposed to any light. Plant C was placed on the windowsill so it could be exposed to natural sunlight for the duration of the day. Plant D was placed in a tray 50 centimeters from a lamp placed on a lab bench. Then a bowl of water was placed in front of the plant to deflect some of the light. For the next four days, the plants were weighed and the weights were recorded. The last day, the percent weight loss was calculated to find the plant with the highest rate of transpiration. By Brittany Carter
and Hart Evans “The amount of water needed daily by plants for the growth and maintenance of tissues is small in comparison to the amount that is lost through the process of transpiration.”(Lab Manual, 2001). Water moves through the xylem and through the plant. If the water is not replenished the plant wilts and dies but if it is the plant constantly transpires to live. The rate of transpiration pulls water up through the plant through the properties of adhesion and cohesion and then the water leaves through the plant cells. The purpose of this lab was to discover the effects that different light conditions have on the rate of transpiration. This is important to classroom study because it reinforces the idea that many factors effect transpiration rate and this lab helps investigate which environments make the process happen faster. Hypothesis:
The pansy in the best lighted environment (lamp) will transpire the fastest and have the greatest weight loss over the period of five days. Materials: Data Sources of error, Suggestions for Improvement, and Further Investigation. Transpiration Introduction.
The transpiration lab measured the rate of transpiration in pansies during a span of five days. The rate of transpiration was dependent on the different types of light set up in the lab which were day light, a lamp, a dark cabinet and the middle of the lab. The plants were placed in bags and weighed for their initial weight then for the next five days, they were measured each day to see how much they transpired each day based on the light conditions. Plant A transpired the most which was in the middle of the lab. It had the greatest weight loss which shows that it had the greatest amount of water loss. This means that the light the plant got in the middle of the classroom from overhead lights and the windows provided the most light and caused the plant to transpire quicker than the rest. Conclusion The pansy at the window transpired the most because the percent weight loss was the highest of the four plants. The pansy in the middle of the class had the second highest rate of transpiration followed closely by the pansy under the lamp. The pansy in the cabinet had a relatively low percent weight change at 17 percent, almost half of the other plants. The hypothesis predicted that the pansy beside the lamp would transpire the most. However, the plant at the windowsill transpired the most even though the two were not too far off on percent weight change. The purpose of this lab was successful because it was found that the windowsill pansy transpired the most and all others in the different environments did but not as much. The purpose was to see which light environment had the most transpiration so that was a success. “An increase in sunlight increases the rate of transpiration by causing more water to evaporate from the leaves and also increases the rate of photosynthesis.” (Goldberg, 2010). The transpiration rate was measured through the loss of weight and then was calculated from there to get the total percent weight loss. The highest transpiration rate, being the pansy at the windowsill, had the highest rate of transpiration because it had exposure to direct sunlight for approximately 10 hours. The sun light was probably hotter and more intense than the others. This would cause transpiration to happen more in the plant than the others. The cabinet pansy, which had no light, was expected to have the lowest rate of transpiration, if any. This means that plants do transpire some without light, though not much. The pansy beside the lamp and the pansy in the middle of the classroom both had very close transpiration rates. This is because they both received light from the window as well as over head lights and the lamp. The lamp was separated from the plant from a bowl filled with water which made the plant not receive as much light. This means the two pansies received the same amounts of light Sources of error that came up in this lab are the tray that held the pansy in front of the lamp was knocked over from one day to the next. This caused the plant to not get as much light from the lamp as usual. Therefore, the plant was not constantly exposed to the light and the transpiration rate decreased because of this. Another source of error was the tape which was used to hold the plant down on the table, stuck to the side of the plant’s bag. That would add weight to the plant that was not calculated in the initial measurement. Then the results would be inaccurate because there was weight added and would make the transpiration rate seem slower. Another source of error was the loss of a leaf on the plant. The plant leaf was lost after the initial weight was taken. After the leaf fell, the plant had already been transpiring and the weight could not be retaken. This would cause extra loss of weight in the plant and would skew the rate of transpiration in the plant. .
The pansy at the window transpired the most because the percent weight loss was the highest of the four plants. The pansy in the middle of the class had the second highest rate of transpiration followed closely by the pansy under the lamp. The pansy in the cabinet had a relatively low percent weight change at 17 percent, almost half of the other plants. The hypothesis predicted that the pansy beside the lamp would transpire the most. However, the plant at the windowsill transpired the most even though the two were not too far off on percent weight change. The purpose of this lab was successful because it was found that the windowsill pansy transpired the most and all others in the different environments did but not as much. The purpose was to see which light environment had the most transpiration so that was a success. “An increase in sunlight increases the rate of transpiration by causing more water to evaporate from the leaves and also increases the rate of photosynthesis.” (Goldberg, 2010). The transpiration rate was measured through the loss of weight and then was calculated from there to get the total percent weight loss. The highest transpiration rate, being the pansy at the windowsill, had the highest rate of transpiration because it had exposure to direct sunlight for approximately 10 hours. The sun light was probably hotter and more intense than the others. This would cause transpiration to happen more in the plant than the others. The cabinet pansy, which had no light, was expected to have the lowest rate of transpiration, if any. This means that plants do transpire some without light, though not much. The pansy beside the lamp and the pansy in the middle of the classroom both had very close transpiration rates. This is because they both received light from the window as well as over head lights and the lamp. The lamp was separated from the plant from a bowl filled with water which made the plant not receive as much light. This means the two pansies received the same amounts of light.
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