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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Prezi

This is a project on a poet.
by

Kelly Yu

on 22 April 2010

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Transcript of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Prezi

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Bibliography Background 2.The Rainy Day The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.
by Kelly Yu and Lauren Ellsworth after 1861 My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall think in the blast,
And the days are dark and dreary. Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary. Why we chose this poem Speaker mouldering: decaying Tone _ / _ /_ / / _ /
And then at furious speed he rode
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Along the Niger's bank;
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His bridle-reins were golden chains,
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And, with a martial clank,
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At each leap he could feel his scabbard of steel
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Smiting his stallion's flank. _ / _ / _ / _ /
He did not feel the driver's whip,
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Nor the burning heat of day;
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For Death had illumined the Land of Sleep,
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And his lifeless body lay
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A worn-out fetter, that the soul
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Had broken and thrown away! A

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Wide through the landscape of his dreams
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The lordly Niger flowed;
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Beneath the palm-trees on the plain
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Once more a king he strode;
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And heard the tinkling caravans
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Descend the mountain-road.


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He saw once more his dark-eyed queen
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Among her children stand;
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They clasped his neck, they kissed his cheeks,
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They held him by the hand!--
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A tear burst from the sleeper's lids
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And fell into the sand.

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Before him, like a blood-red flag,
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The bright flamingoes flew;
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From morn till night he followed their flight,
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O'er plains where the tamarind grew,
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Till he saw the roofs of Caffre huts,
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And the ocean rose to view.
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At night he heard the lion roar,
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And the hyena scream,
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And the river-horse, as he crushed the reeds
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Beside some hidden stream;
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And it passed, like a glorious roll of drums,
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Through the triumph of his dream.


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The forests, with their myriad tongues,
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Shouted of liberty;
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And the Blast of the Desert cried aloud,
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With a voice so wild and free,
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That he started in his sleep and smiled
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At their tempestuous glee.
3.The Slave's Dream Close Reading _ / _ _ / _ _ _ /
Beside the ungathered rice he lay,
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His sickle in his hand;
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His breast was bare, his matted hair
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Was buried in the sand.
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Again, in the mist and shadow of sleep,
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He saw his Native Land. Aww, we ran out of letters! Thanks for watching!!!
Any questions??? Any comments??? Q

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martial: warlike
tamarind: species of tropical tree
myriad: numerous
tongues: languages
tempestuous glee: agitated
fetter: confinement ? ? :D :D 1807-1882 1842 - Born in 1807 in Portland, Maine to a large, wealthy family. He grew up there and later studied at Bowdoin College, the school where he would later become a teacher.

-Longfellow didn't become a poet until mid-life. He always wanted to become a writer and he published poems (and other works) in well known magazines, but his profession was teaching for most of his life.

-After graduating college, Benjamin Orr, impressed with Longfellow, employed him and sent him on a 4 year trip to Europe for him to study French, Spanish, and Italian, costing his father 2.6 million dollars.

- He married Frances Appleton in 1843, a woman he had been persistantly persuing for years. They lived happily and had 6 children, until Frances' tragic death in 1861.
It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadows brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would by lyinc dead,
Pierced by a British musket-ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,---
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load. So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,---
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.
Why we chose this poem Tone Speaker Meaning Writing Stle Writing Style Theme Why we
chose this
poem Why he
wrote this
poem Speaker

Tone

Rhyme

Meter

Figurative
Language Buell, Lawrence. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Selected Poems. Canada: Penguin Classics, 1988

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Poets and Poetry. 2006 ed.

"Henry Wadsworth Longfellow" wikipedia.org. 13 April, 2010
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wadsworth_Longfellow
Longfellow's Writing -Longfellow is sometimes referred to as "the children's poet".

-Wrote American History, everyday life and culture, love, loss, slavery, and more.

-Wrote mainly long narrative poems, but he wrote short ballads, lyrics, and short stories as well. 1. Paul Revere's Ride
Late 1860s Symbolism What this poem is about Imagery Irony
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