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ABORIGINAL ISSUES AND EVENTS IN CANADA

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Caitlin Mescallado

on 12 December 2013

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Transcript of ABORIGINAL ISSUES AND EVENTS IN CANADA

ABORIGINAL ISSUES
AND EVENTS

WORLD WAR I
Beginning of WWI. Approximately 400 to 500 Aboriginal children continued to be removed from their families during the period of 1914 to 1918, including children whose fathers are overseas at war.
ASSIMILATION POLICY
21 Apr 1937
WORLD WAR II
1 Sep 1939
By: Caitlin & Kate
A native in the Canadian Forestry Corps
Aboriginal People in Canada are the indigenous peoples in North America within the boundaries of present-day Canada.
The descriptors "Indian" and "Eskimo" have largely fallen into disuse in Canada and are commonly considered pejorative.
NATIVES
ABORIGINES
INDIGENOUS
ABORIGINAL
5 June 1914
Aboriginal people serve in the war despite the Defence Act 1909 which prohibits any person not of 'substantially European' origin from serving. Aboriginal soldiers are among Australian troops at Gallipoli.
Lance Corporal John Shiwak, ca. 1915-1917
John Shiwak, a hunter and trapper of Inuit descent from Labrador, served as a sniper and scout in the First World War.
ABORIGINES ACT
1934
Under the Aborigines Act, Aboriginal people apply to 'cease being Aboriginal' and have access to the same rights as 'whites'. The Arnhmen Land Reserve is declared.
Aboriginal Welfare - Conference of Commonwealth and State Authorities called by the federal government, decides that the official policy for some Aboriginal people is assimilation policy.
Aboriginal people of mixed descent are to be assimilated into white society whether they want to be or not, those not living tribally are to be educated and all others are to stay on reserves.
EXEMPTION CERTIFICATES
5 June 1943
An Exemption Certificate is introduced, exempting certain Aboriginal people from restrictive legislative and entitling them to vote, drink alcohol and move freely but prohibiting them from consorting with others who are not exempt.
Aboriginal people use the derogatory terms 'dog tags' or 'dog licenses' to refer to the certificates. For many Aboriginal people this renunciation of their traditional lifestyle is promoted as the only opportunity to overcome poverty, gain work and acess to education.
World War II begins. Although Aboriginal people are not recognised as citizens, two Aboriginal miltary units are established and some Aboriginal people serve in other sections of the armed forces as formally enlisted soldiers, sailors or airmen.
Aboriginal people serve in Europe, the Middle East, the Pacific and New Guinea. Aboriginal children continue to be removed from their families during the period 1939 to 1945, including children who fathers are at war overseas.
RIGHT TO ENROLL
1949
SCHOOLING
1950
COMMONWEALTH ELECTORAL ACT
1962
INTERGRATION POLICY
1965
ABORIGINAL PEOPLE HAS RIGHTS TOO..
RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ACT
1975
Full transcript