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The Pearl by John Steinbeck

Chapter Analysis
by

Adriana Alba

on 9 January 2013

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Transcript of The Pearl by John Steinbeck

The Pearl a novella by John Steinbeck Monitor Evaluate Monitor Predict Summarize Question (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr CHAPTER 1 Draw a picture or list the three most important things that happen in this chapter Monitor Evaluate Monitor Predict Summarize Question (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr CHAPTER 2 Draw a picture or list the three most important things that happen in this chapter Monitor Evaluate Monitor Predict Summarize Question (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr CHAPTER 3 Draw a picture or list the three most important things that happen in this chapter Monitor Evaluate Monitor Predict Summarize Question (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr CHAPTER 4 Draw a picture or list the three most important things that happen in this chapter Monitor Evaluate Monitor Predict Summarize Question (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr CHAPTER 5 Draw a picture or list the three most important things that happen in this chapter Monitor Evaluate Monitor Predict Summarize Question (cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr CHAPTER 6 Draw a picture or list the three most important things that happen in this chapter CHAPTER 2: Predict
Based on what you learned in the
novel's exposition, make predictions
about Chapter 2 based on the following
questions:

What will Kino do because of his experience at the doctor's house? CHAPTER 2: Question
As you read, look for the answer to the following
questions:
1. How is a pearl formed?
2. What does Juana pray for? Why?
3. What two discoveries are made at the end of Chapter 2? CHAPTER 2: MONITOR

The quote:
"...There was no certainty in seeing, no proof that what you saw was tehre or was not there. and the people of the Gulf expected all places were that way, and it was not strange to them" (p. 14),

reveals/ demonstrates/shows __________________. CHAPTER 2: MONITOR

The quote:

"But the remedy lacked his authority because it was simple and didn't cost anything" (p. 15),

demonstrates/shows/proves CHAPTER 2: Monitor:

The quote:
"__________________________________"p.

demonstrates/shows/proves
________________________________________
________________________________________ Before describing Kino's momentous discovery of "the greatest pearl in the world, the omniscient narrator tells readers that pearls were "accidents, and the finding of one was luck" (p. 16).

* Based on these statements by the narrator, how much control does an individual like Kino have over his/her “success” in life? What circumstances limit "success" for Kino and his people? CHAPTER 3: Predictions

Based on events that took place in Chapter 1 & 2
make predictions about the following:

1. ) What will Kino do with the "greatest pearl in the world"?
2. ) How will Kino and Juana change as a result of the pearl?
3.) How will others change toward Kino and Juana? CHAPTER 3 QUESTIONS:

1.) In the opening of Chapter 3, what is the town compared to? Why do you suppose Steinbeck makes this comparison?
2.) How does the news of the pearl affect a) the pries, b) the shopkeepers, c) the doctor, and d) the beggars?
3.) Describe how the Doctor's attitude changes toward Kino and Juana and explain his motivation. Chapter 3: Monitor

The quote:

"The news stirred up something infinitely black and evil in the town; the black distillate was like the scorpion, or like hunger in the smell of food, or like loneliness when love is withheld" (p. 23).

demonstrates/shows/proves Chapter 3: Monitor

The quote:

"Thus, Kino's future was real, but having set it up, other forces were set up to destroy it, and this he knew, so that he had to prepare to meet the attack" (p. 29),

demonstrates/shows/proves Chapter 3: Monitor

The quote:

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

demonstrates/shows/proves Based on the events in this chapter, how would Steinbeck answer the following question:

How has possession of the pearl changed Kino and his wife?

Can things ever return to the way they were? Why or why not? Chapter 4: Predict
Based on what the events which took
place in Ch. 3, make predictions on the
following questions:
1.) Will Kino sell his pearl?
2.) Will his plans start coming true?
Why or why not? CHAPTER 4: Questions
As you read, look for the answer to the following
questions:
1.) Why is this a big day for the entire village?
2.) What does the priest say in his sermon? What does it reveal?
3.) Why is there no longer any real competition among the pearl buyers? What does this suggest about the social and economic systems that control the circumstances of the townspeople? Chapter 4: Monitor

The quote:

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

demonstrates/shows/proves The quote:
_________________________________
demonstrates/ shows/proves
_________________________________. The quote:
_________________________________
demonstrates/ shows/proves
_________________________________. * Based on the events in Chapter 4: What is good and what is evil?

Which characters symbolize good and which represent evil?

Based on these symbols, what is the difference between good and evil? Are there any inbetweens? Chapter 5 Predict
Based on the events which took place in Chapter 4:
1. Will the pearl change Kino for the better or worse?
2. Will Kino and Juana's relationship change because of the pearl?
3. If Kino reaches the city will he get a better As you read Chapter 5, look for answers to the
following questions:
1. What does Juana try to do with the pearl and what is Kino's reaction?
2. What happens on the beach?
3. Why is Kino's brother afraid for him? The quote:

"He had said , 'I am a man, ' and that meant certain things to Juana. It meant that he was half insane an half god. it meant that Kino would drive his strength against a mountain and plunge his strength against the sea" (p. 59).

demonstrates/shows/proves
___________________________________________________. The quote:

"It is the pearl, " said Juan Tomas, "There is a devil in this pearl. You should have sold it and passed on the devil" (p. 65).

demonstrates/shows/proves
___________________________________________________. The quote:
"This pearl has become my soul, " said Kino. "If I give it up I sahll lose my soul." (p. 67 )

demonstrates/shows/proves
___________________________________________________. Based on the events in this chapter, how would Steinbeck answer the following question:

How has possession of the pearl changed Kino and his wife?

Can things ever return to the way they were? Why or why not? As you read Chapter 6, look for answers to the
following questions:
1. Why is Kino more convinced than ever that the pearl is of great value?
2. Why does Kino consider letting the trackers take him?
3. What is the most obvious change to Kino's family at the story's resolution? Based on events which took place in Chapter 5:
1. Will Kino arrive to his destination?
2. Will Kino find out who has been trying to steal the pearl?
3. Will Kino ever sell the pearl? To who? The quote:

...some animal thing was moving in him so that he was cautious and wary and dangerous; some ancient thing out of the past of his people was alive in him (p. 69).

demonstrates/shows/proves
__________________________________________________________________________. The quote:

____________________________________________________________________________

demonstrates/shows/proves
__________________________________________________________________________. The quote:

____________________________________________________________________________

demonstrates/shows/proves
__________________________________________________________________________. Analyzing the outcome of events in a story's plot, is one way to find an author's message or theme. Based on the way that the central conflict is solved:
1. What is oppression?
2. What causes oppression?
3. If the pearl represents power, what is Steinbeck communicating about power? Unit Goal: Write an essay that identifies John Steinbeck's theme or message about power and social oppression in his novel “The Pearl” though an analysis that is supported by analysis of style, symbolism, and figurative language.

Objectives: Students will be able to DESCRIBE the stylistic effect of the Omniscient narrator on the exposition of the novel and naturalist theme by completing a chapter analysis map. Point of View: Omniscient third-person narrator.

The story is told by a God-Like observer who is observing the characters and actions from outside the story.
3. People are beaten down and generally defeated by natural and/or hostile economic forces they cannot possibly overcome.

 

4. Common settings, lower class, unremarkable people who somehow become involved in intense dramatic incidents, usually ending in violent death. NATURALISM Steinbeck was a "naturalist" writer.

Naturalist Writers believed that man does not have free will; rather man's fate is determined by large social and economic forces he cannot control. 1. Presents human behavior as a scientist would – just the facts with no moral judgment at all – attempts to be painstakingly precise

 
2. Human beings as “animals” – products of their heredity and environment – fate is predetermined by the circumstances of life.

 
3. People are beaten down and generally defeated by natural and/or hostile economic forces they cannot possibly overcome.

 4. Common settings, lower class, unremarkable people who somehow become involved in intense dramatic incidents, usually ending in violent death.

 
5. While all this seems negative and contrary to a person’s life meaning much of anything, the 20th century naturalist almost always builds in a sense of importance of the individual – a significance to their lives. REFLECTION: What is Naturalism? Do you agree with it?

TOPIC SENTENCE: Explain Naturalism in your own words.
INTRODUCE ANALYSIS: What would be a "naturalist" view of the American Dream?
ANALYSIS: Do you agree with Naturalists view of life and the American Dream?
COMMENTARY: Why or why not? CA Focus Standards:
Reading 3.11 Evaluate the aesthetic qualities of style including the impact of diction and figurative language on tone, mood and theme using the terminology of literary criticism.
Writing 2.2 Write responses to literature. The way a writer uses language. The writer's choice of words. The author's attitude. The feeling the story evokes. Essential Questions:
1. What is a parable? Why do author's choose this style to communicate a universal theme?
2. What are symbols? Why are they useful to writers and their audience?
3. Can parables such as The Pearl be used to combat oppression and effect social change in society? Thematic Questions
* What is oppression? How does oppression affect both community and individual?
* What are some injustices that you see in the world around you? How can injustice or society’s wrongs be righted?
* How much control does an individual have over his/her “success” in life?
* Can money or desire change an individual? For the better or the worse? Explain.
* Is money necessary to be “successful” in life?
* What is the difference between good and evil? Are their any inbetweens? "In the town they tell the story of the great pearl-- how it was found and how it was lost again...If this story is a parable, perhaps everyone takes his own meaning from it and reads his own life in it." NON-EXAMPLE EXAMPLE NON-EXAMPLE NON-EXAMPLE EXAMPLE EXAMPLE NON-EXAMPLE EXAMPLE NON-EXAMPLE NON-EXAMPLE EXAMPLE THEMES? A truth that can be taken from the specifics of a story and applied to society in general. Justice & Equality 1. As a team, read through the provided list of Essential Questions.
2. Select one question from the list and discuss, using real-world examples, personal observations/experiences, literature, historical events, etc.
3. As you discuss, jot down ideas on your team’s quadrant placemat, using sentences, words, diagrams, and/or pictures.
4. Be prepared to share out your team’s question and ideas using Lettered Heads! ROUNDTABLE Ch. 1
1. On page 2, Kino has arisen and the day has begun. What is the song he hears and what does it suggest about how he is feeling?
2. On page 3, Juana sings a song that Kino perceives as part of "the whole." What is that "Whole"?
3. What does the doctor's comment on page 13 reveal about his and society's attitude towards Indians? The quote, "His people had once been great makers of songs so that everything they saw or thought or did or heard became a song. That was very long ago" (p. 2),

demonstrates that Kino is a part of tradition in which songs are very important way of maintaining a connection to their identity or who they are as a people. Partner A: Partner B: Partner C: Partner D: Parable: a simple story used to give a moral lesson. 11.26 The Pearl: Introduction Notes UNIT GOAL:
Standards: style

diction

tone

Mood

parable:

theme:

Point of view

Naturalism The quote, "A wonderful thing, a memoriable thing to want the doctor. To get him would be a remarkable thing. The doctor never came to the cluster of brush houses" (p.7)

reveals/ demonstrates/ shows that Kino's community does not have access to medical attention due to _______________________________. The quote, "This doctor was of a race which for nearly four hundred years had beaten and starved and robbed and despised Kino's race, and frightened in too, so that the indigene came humbly to the door" (p. 9),

reveals/ demonstrates/ proves __________________. Oppression is the prolonged cruel or unjust treatment or control of a person or group by another.

• Someone who is oppressed is subject to unjust treatment or control.

Who is "oppressed" in John Steinbeck's The Pearl? Who is the oppressor? How does oppression affect both the community of La Paz and the individuals who live in it? As we read Chapter 3, students will identify important symbols in the story and explain how they are used by Steinbeck to communicate theme. A character, object, or place that is meant to represent a larger idea. The Pearl by John Steinbeck Objective: As students read Chapter 5, they will identify figurative language that helps the author convey his philosophical message. language based on a comparison that
is not literally true. 1. What is oppression and what is its relationship to power?
2. How does oppression affect both community and individual? 3. How does oppression and power affect the characters and events in the story of John Steinbeck’s naturalist novel and parable, The Pearl? 1.In naturalist novels, characters are often lower class people who are beaten down and generally defeated by natural and/or hostile economic forces they cannot possibly overcome. Why is Kino the perfect “naturalist” protagonist?
2. Provide a specific event and quote that serves as evidence which prove the character traits which make Kino and his family naturalist characters. 1.What are symbols and/ or symbolism?
2. What are some important symbols in the novel? What do they represent?
3.. How do these symbols serve to convey Steinbeck’s message about oppression and power? 1. At the beginning of the story, Steinbeck writes, "In the town they tell the story of the great pearl-- how it was found and how it was lost again...If this story is a parable, perhaps everyone takes his own meaning from it and reads his own life in it.” What makes this story a PARABLE?

2. How does the PARABLE form help Steinbeck illustrate his message about oppression and power?
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