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Ozymandias by: Percy Bysshe Shelley

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by

Kailee Quinn

on 7 March 2014

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Transcript of Ozymandias by: Percy Bysshe Shelley

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things,
The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains: round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away..
Citations
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
"“Two trunkless legs of stone” are the only remains of a stone statue modeled after Ramses that was once 57ft tall. (source) There is no longer a body or a torso, only two legs standing on a pedestal. Next to the trunkless legs, half sunk into the sand and shattered, is what used to be the statue’s face. The face is described to have a “frown and wrinkled lip and a “sneer of cold command”." (Paola)
Monday, February 17, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Ozymandias
Analysis
Line-by-Line
Conclusion
Analysis
XX%
Pride
A: two people - older
B: conversing - legs without body - sculpture
A: lonely statue - bunch of sand
B: Broke head of statue - half buried - sad?
A: Mad - scowl - leader
C: Sculptor knew the leader's heart
D: Feelings are still alive - engraved to last
C: Feelings live on
E: There's word on this large ruler's throne
D: Ramses II - Egypt - Prideful
E: So accomplished - you're unworthy (irony)
F: No "works" to see - only death
E: Large (ego?) destruction - nothing to see
F: Lonely - dry - dead
Born Hornsham, Sussex, England
Eldest son of Timothy and Elizabeth Shelley
Eton College (6 years) and then Oxford University
Expelled from Oxford before 1 year
Refused to declare himself a Christian
First Publication
Zastrozzi
(1810)
19, he eloped to Harriet Westbrook, 16
First son (1815) - died two weeks later
1816 - Second son, William
-Harriet Shelley committed suicide
Married Mary Goodwin 3 weeks later and lost custody
Second wife, Mary Shelley, was the author of
Frankenstein
Drowned in a storm while attempting to sail from Leghorn to La Spezia, Italy
In the analysis written on Paoal's Blog (http://hero026.edublogs.org/ozymandias-analysis/) it explains line-by-line the meaning of the poem. The writer believes that the poem is referring to Ramses' II Empire in Ancient Egypt. The statue and the description of the facial features describe the common idea of Ramses strict and fierce rule, throughout the poem there are various examples that point directly to Ramses and his reign.
"Percy Bysshe Shelley." Poets.org. N.p.. Web. 27 Feb 2014. <http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/179>.
"Ozymandias ." Shmoop.com. N.p.. Web. 28 Feb 2014. <http://www.shmoop.com/ozymandias/transience-theme.html>.
"Breaking Bad I Ozymandias Tribute." Youtube.com. Web. 1 Mar 2014. <http://www.youjtube.com/watch?v=dx_u0NZkPUk
Literary devices
Ozymandias
Paola's Blog

(August 4, 1792 - July 8, 1822)
Ozymandias by: Percy Bysshe Shelley
Themes
"King of Kings"
Statue fragment
Transience
"colossal wreck"
destined to die
Nature
positive and negative
pantheism
Symbols
Statue - Tyranny
passion in lifeless medium
Diction
Synecdoche -Visage
-Hand
Meter
Pentameter
Petrarchan (8-6)
Shakespearean rhyme for first 4 lines
ABABACDCEDEFEF
I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things,
The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains: round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away.
Kailee And Kasandra
Full transcript