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Tufted Deer

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by

Amanda Low

on 3 June 2015

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Transcript of Tufted Deer

Grows and Develops
Family & Genus
Cells
History
Diagram
Cool Facts
-They get their name from tuft of hair located on forehead, which also hides their short antlers

-(as you know...) Males have canines that can grow up to 10 inches

-Live in high valley jungles and mountain forests in Central Asia

-They bark when alarmed or for attracting mates
Tufted Deer
Elaphodus cephalophus michianus
Is it Alive?
Thank you for watching!
Bibliography
http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Elaphodus_cephalophus/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tufted_deer
https://prezi.com/l07g-ny6tkie/tufted-deer/
http://featuredcreature.com/rare-fang-tastic-tufted-deer-shocks-with-its-huge-canines/
http://eol.org/data_objects/31392262
http://www.wild-facts.com/2013/tufted-deer/

It develops from baby to adult
Family: Deer or Cervidae
(there's a lot of diversity, so there's not too many common characteristics)
All cervids have a hard palate in mouth
All species have at least antlers on males
Bilateral symmetry
Male is always larger in species
Sexes are shaped differently
Ornamentation normally males, have certain features used for different purposes, i.e. : mating
Made of Cells
Eukaryotic cells make up it is body
Reproduces
Reproduces Sexually
Uses Energy
Eats leaves, twigs, fruits, grasses and vegetation
Responds to Stimuli
They bark when alarmed
by the Amandas
brought to you by Presi
Fossils of the tufted deer have been found, dating 0.13 million years ago
Said to be evolved (more directly) from the extinct Dicrocerus
Famous canines have evolved through natural selection
Is made of Eukaryotic cells. ------->
Female tufted deer have 46 or 47 chromosomes.
Chromosomes
Endoplasmic Reticulum - A network of passageways that carries materials around the cell
Mitochondria - Produces most of the cells energy (the powerhouse)
Cytoplasm - The liquid that hold everything in place
Lysosome - It breaks down food, waste, and worn-out cell parts
Ribosome - Produces protein for the cell
Nucleus - The "brain" of the cell controls activity of the cell and contains hereditary material (DNA)
Golgi - Receives and packages materials from the ER and send them out to the other parts of the cell
Kingdom:
Animalia
Phylum:
Chordata
Class:
Mammalia
Order:
Artiodactyla
Subfamily:

Cervinae
Genus:
Elaphodus

Species:
E. cephalophus
Classification:
Family:

Cervidae
Genus: Elaphodus
Animal in this genus include:

Deers:
Fallow deer, Corsican red deer, marsh deer, etc.
Elk:
Eastern elk, Roosevelt elk, etc.
Moose:
Eastern moose, Alaska moose, etc.
- males with larger canines reproduced more frequently, and eventually, the canine length grew larger and larger each generation
The tufted deer is quite small, size was also adapted through natural selection
- the smaller the animal was, the more agile and more difficult it was to see
Fur adaptation: camouflage and escape
- the fur of the tufted deer matches exactly with its habitat, therefore, through natural selection, those with highly camouflaged fur reproduced more often.
- the tail also has unique coloring, the upper side of the tail is brown, and bottom side white. When frightened, it will bolt off, and wagg the tail up and down, creating a confusing pattern in its wake
Tufted Deer, Geologic Time Period
The area in which the tufted deer was first established in is not precisely known, but deers first appeared in the Paleogene Period (65-24 mya) and Neogene Period (24-1.8 mya).
Cenozioc Era:
Fossil of a giant deer (or Irish elk), one of the first deer, compared to human skeleton.
Tuft
Fangs - (male only)- to defend from predators and
Ears - for hearing
Tail - used to distract/confuse predators
Hind legs - walking/running
Fore legs - walking/running
Antler - (male only and is very small)
Male tufted deer have 47 or 48 chromosomes.
Full transcript