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Detailed reading is a teaching strategy that provides a high

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on 22 January 2015

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Transcript of Detailed reading is a teaching strategy that provides a high

This strategy can be used at the paragraph or sentence level.
Paragraph level
Sentence level
Detailed Reading
Paragraph level
Detailed reading involves marking key information in each paragraph, note making and rewriting; and making connections between paragraphs to understand the text.


Sentence level
Detailed reading sentence by sentence involves marking key words in each sentence.


Detailed Reading
Detailed reading is a teaching strategy that provides a high-level support for the students. There are three stages:
text notes
that mark
rewriting
.


Tex Marking


The purpose of text marking is to identify key information in each paragraph, after it has been read and discussed
Text marking
Note making
Students act as scribes to document the key words. They use dot points to represent each sentence, with a dash between each word.

say what is in the notes in their own words
suggest alternative words and/or phrases and write these
clarify the topic further through discussion and writing.
Rewriting
Students brainstorm what they want to write in response to the paragraph.

All ideas are describe.
The three cues which are provided to prepare them when reading are:

the meaning of the sentence in general
the location in the sentence of the key word
the meaning of the word within the sentence.

Students find a key word or words, and highlight. The key word may be elaborated on, including:

definitions of new or technical terms
explanations of new concepts.
Most paragraphs begin with a topic that is located towards the end of the first or second sentence. The topic tells the reader what the paragraph is about.
Many paragraphs come to a point, towards the end of the paragraph. The point is what the author has to say about the topic.
Some paragraphs do not come to a point, but consist of an explanation or argument sequence. In this case each main step in the explanation or argument may need highlighting.
It is important to demonstrate to students how to highlight the minimal information they need when note making.
DETAILED READING

Some disciplines such as law and literature, for example, require a very detailed understanding of the text. This kind of reading is always more time consuming, but can be combined with skimming and scanning for greater efficiency.

Note making


Students act as scribes to document the key words. They use dot points to represent each sentence, with a dash between each word.

Students and the teacher:

say what is in the notes in their own words
suggest alternative words and/or phrases and write these
clarify the topic further through discussion and writing.
UNICEF stands for United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund. It was created by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946, to provide emergency food and health care to children in countries that had been devastated by World War II.

In 1954, UNICEF became a permanent part of the United Nations System. UNICEF relies on contributions from governments and private donors. Governments contribute two thirds of the organization's resources; private groups and some 6 million individuals contribute the rest through the National Committees. Most of UNICEF's work is in the field, with staff in over 190 countries and territories. More than 200 country offices carry out UNICEF's mission through a program developed with host governments. Seven regional offices provide technical assistance to country offices as needed.

UNICEF's programs emphasize developing community-level services to promote the health and well-being of children. UNICEF was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1965 and the Prince of Asturias Award of Concord in 2006.
UNICEF significa Fondo de las Naciones Unidas para la Infancia . Fue creado por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas el 11 de diciembre de 1946, para proporcionar alimentos de emergencia y atención de salud a los niños en los países que habían sido devastados por la Segunda Guerra Mundial.

En 1954, UNICEF se convirtió en una parte permanente del Sistema de las Naciones Unidas. UNICEF se basa en las contribuciones de los gobiernos y donantes privados. Los gobiernos aportan dos tercios de los recursos de la organización; grupos privados y unos 6 millones de personas contribuyen el resto a través de los Comités Nacionales. La mayor parte del trabajo de UNICEF se encuentra en el campo, con el personal en más de 190 países y territorios. Más de 200 oficinas en los países llevan a cabo la misión de UNICEF a través de un programa desarrollado con los gobiernos anfitriones. Siete oficinas regionales prestan asistencia técnica a las oficinas de país, según sea necesario.

Los programas de UNICEF enfatizan el desarrollo de los servicios a nivel comunitario para promover la salud y el bienestar de los niños. UNICEF recibió el Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1965 y el Premio Príncipe de Asturias de la Concordia en 2006.
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