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Science Fair Project - Soap Vs. water

Science experiment showing effect soapy water has on plants.
by

Catrina Frisbie

on 12 January 2013

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Transcript of Science Fair Project - Soap Vs. water

Plant Growth: Soap Vs. Water Catrina Frisbie
Grade 8
Mrs. Allmon Purpose Background Research Source 1 – Kalman, Bobbie. How a Plant Grows. New York, NY: Crabtree Pub., 1997. Print.

I learned about the life cycle of seeds and how they grow. I learned how water is soaked in through the roots to help bring it to life. Hypothesis If plants are watered with soapy water this will effect the growth of the plants. If they are watered with plain water the plants should not be effected.

When plants are exposed to soapy water I found in research if it is sprayed occasionally it will repel insects but, could kill the leaves. If watered with soapy water toxins.

Bibliography Gillman, Jeff. The Truth about Garden Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't & Why. Portland, Or.: Timber, 2006. Print.
Kalman, Bobbie. How a Plant Grows. New York, NY: Crabtree Pub., 1997. Print.
"Plant Requirements Page." Plant Requirements Page. United States National Arboretum, n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.
Vegetable Research and Information Center. "USING HOUSEHOLD WASTE WATER ON PLANTS." Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California. University of California, n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.
Ward, Rosemary. Garden Problem Solver. London: Mitchell Beazley, 2012. Print.
The purpose of my experiment was to see the effect soapy water has on the growth of a plants. I know I am not a very skilled gardener and neither are a lot of people. So with this experiment I am trying to see if soapy water from possible soap residue left in a container will harm the plants. This will be helpful because it will give the knowledge to others that soapy water could prevent your plants from growing. I chose this topic to see if using soapy water would effect the growth of plants.

I chose it because sometimes there is still a soapy residue left in containers hand washed. Source 2 – "Plant Requirements Page." Plant Requirements Page. United States National Arboretum, n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.

Plants need sunlight for energy to grow. Plants require water to grow and mainly need warm temperatures. Source 3 – Ward, Rosemary. Garden Problem Solver. London: Mitchell Beazley, 2012. Print.

Chemicals in water can dry soil out and kill plant. I learned ways to keep a plant healthy. Background Research
Continued... Source 4 – Gillman, Jeff. The Truth about Garden Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't & Why. Portland, Or.: Timber, 2006. Print.

Dish soap can harm plants by remove wax from leaves. Dish soap can cause the soil to hold too much water harming the growth. Source 5 -Vegetable Research and Information Center. "USING HOUSEHOLD WASTE WATER ON PLANTS." Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California. University of California, n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.

Potted plants will not get enough water from soapy water. Dish soap contains toxins for plants only use for emergency. Experimental Design Constant Variables: The location of plants in house by window, the experiment time of 14 days, 2 easy to grow Marigold egg plants.

Dependent Variable: Whether the plants grow or not.

Independent variable: What water solution is given to each plant.
Materials 2 Marigold easy to grow egg plants
1 bottle of Dawn Ultra dish soap (will use 70ml)
Water 1,120 ml total for experiment
2 empty bottles 50 ml each in size
(1 for soapy water mix and other for plain water)
5 ml measuring spoon
1 Measuring cup at least 60ml in size
20 ml small measuring container Procedure Step 1- Take 2 Marigold easy to grow
egg pants and unwrap and crack tops off.
Step 2- Label one plant A and the other
plant B.
Step 3- Use 5ml measuring spoon and place
5ml of Dawn Ultra dish soap in it.
Step 4 – Empty the 5 ml of Dawn Ultra dish
soap into the 60 ml measuring cup.
Step 5 – Use 20 ml small measuring
container and fill it up to the 20 ml mark
with water.
Procedure Continued...
Step 6- Empty the 20 ml of water into the 60 ml measuring cup with the soap. Do this twice
making a total of 40 ml of water.
Step 7 – mix soap and water in measuring cup using
the end of the 5ml measuring spoon.
Step 8 – Empty soapy water mix into the 50 ml bottle labeled Plant B or Soapy mix.
Step 9 – Use 20 ml small measuring container and fill
it up to the 20 ml mark with water.
Step 10 - Empty the 20 ml of water into the 50 ml
bottle labeled Plant A or Water. Do this twice
making a total of 40 ml of water.

Procedures Continued... Step 11 – Empty 50 ml bottle marked Plant A into Plant A.
Step 12 – Empty 50 ml bottle marked Plant B into Plant B.
Repeat steps 3 – 12 for 14 days. Watch, monitor changes in the plants and record data. Data Analysis Analysis on growth over a 14 day period. Results As a result of this experiment the plant
watered with soapy water did not grow. This
was proven when I watered plant A with just
water and it grew and Plant B with the soapy
mix did not grow. During my experiment I
watered both plants the same time of day with
the same amount of water with the exception of
plant B receiving 5 ml of soap mixed into it. Both
of the plants were located next to each other
given the same amount of sunlight. As I was
watching the changes in both plants I noticed
plant A started to grow and plant B never
started. The soil seemed to dry out faster
in plant B.

The results relate to my purpose because it does
show the effects soapy water has on the growth of a plant.

Conclusions My results were not only will soapy water
harm a plant, but also prevent it from growing.
The results matched my hypothesis proving soapy water can harm a plant. When doing research I
learned of some beneficial results of soapy water occasional sprayed on plants.

Research showed how it could repel insects in a more natural way than pesticides. However, I found in both research and with my results it can also kill a plant or prevent it from growing all together. There are many ingredients in dish soap that are not on its label and can be highly toxic to plants.

The only explanation I can give for my results
would be that the plant watered with a soapy mix
the soil dried up quickly. The quick drying up of
the soil could have caused the plant to not
grow because not enough water was being
absorbed through the roots. Conclusions Continued... The toxins in the dish soap could have made the soil toxic to the plant.
In order to improve on this experiment I would try several different dish soaps and expanded it a longer time. I also could use plants that were already starting to grow instead of starting with seeds.
So in conclusion, I would try to avoid using any container that could possibly have any soap residue to water plants. I also would not use recycled dish water unless it’s an emergency and foe a short time.

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