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Latin Midterm/Final portfolio

My project for the latin midterm/final portfolio
by

Rebecca B

on 21 June 2013

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Transcript of Latin Midterm/Final portfolio

A reflective presentation
of this year's projects and
classwork

Advanced Latin Literature Portfolio ||
I can't say that I've had the best year of latin this year which is really my own fault. There is everything I can do to improve my work quality as well as timeliness. Though I've had a rough start to the year due to my general lack of effort there is no reason I can't turn that around and have a good second half of the year. I had a rough start from the beginning failing a test though I then went and passed the second one on Catullus fairly well. I had also put a good deal of studying into that test and had been extremely happy to see that it had paid off. I do believe that the pay off has acted as a motivation to do some what better. I also need to improve upon my timeliness in regards to turning in homework. I had started out well with that at the beginning of this marking period but life and laziness took hold again much to my disdain and I fell behind in that again. It's unfortunately reinstated that thing in myself I'm trying to fix where if I'm not fully engaged or comfortable with a subject, I'm likely not to try to put effort into it. This is something that I will continue to try to work to improve to the best of my abilities and hopefully finish the year strong.
In regards to my life connecting with Ancient Rome, that is all too pertinent right now as I'm a classics academy student. Something that especially in history/math and english allows us to connect the ancient to present on a daily basis. Through not only characters but little aspects of ancient writing such as Tiro's method of note taking are still used fully or to a degree to this day. Many of our character models are maintained from ancient myth and our government as well as our architecture is still very much based off of ancient model as well. Our past(humanities) in many ways informs our present.
The Latin Translations ||
A quick reflection||
There was a huge contrast in the latin we've read so far this year. Catullus was a tragic poet, writing mostly in terms of what we read of his lost love "Lesbia" a women we know to otherwise be Clodia Metelli and a woman who, when we transfer over to Cicero, is one on trial. The connection between the two is actually rather interesting and allows for a greater overall understanding of the works we have read on the whole. This was especially so when we read "Conspirata!" as a predecessor to Cicero and his trials. In fact, reading the historical fiction helped to add to the translations as we were giving a set background that heightened our knowledge of what was to happen. It also allowed us a giggle when Catullus the poet was even mentioned as someone Clodia was with.
Cicero Pro Caelio Part IV ||
But however from this very women I will ask first whether she would prefer me to act sternly (old fashioned) and strictly and violently, or gently, lightly, and cool. If in this harsh custom and manner, someone I must wake from the dead from those bearded guys, not with this little beard (indicate Rufus) that women is pleased but with that scruffy beard that we see on death masks and ancient statues in order to scold the woman and to speak on behalf of me so that by chance she may not be angry with me. // Therefore let some one from this very family stand out and especially that well-known Caecus; indeed he will take up the least grief (to suffer) that guy who will see such a woman. Surely he, if he stepped out, he will act and speak in this way: women, what do you have to do with Caelius, what with a man so young, what with a stranger? Why have you been so intimate with the result that you supply him gold, or so hostile to fear poison? You do not see your father, did you not heat your uncle, your grandfather, your great grandfather, your forefather, your forefather were consuls?
Catullus 85 ||
Odi
et
amo.
quare id faciam fortasse
requiris
nescio
, sed fieri
sentio
et
excrucior.
Cultural unit projects ||
The Prezi ||
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The Catullus and Lesbia Relationship Project||
The Catullus and Lesbia Relationship was my favourite project thus far simply due to the design element. Both of the projects were rather similar in regards to the analysis of the relationship between the two. I found this one to be more interesting though as we were able to see the progression of Catullus' feelings towards her as he realizes the relationship between the two is indeed quite over. I though I overall did well on this though I perhaps could have gone a little further into my analysis of the poems though I thought I followed the rubric pretty well.
I hate
and
I love
. Perhaps
you ask why
I do this?
I do not know
, yet
I know
it to be so, and I am
tortured.
This poem, though simple in appearance, is by far one of my favourites. Perhaps this can be attributed to it's short length but I find it easy to form a grasp and really connect with Catullus and his emotional disconnect. The poem is written as a ABBA chiasmus which directly contrasts his own points showing the unrest in his mind which is only heightened by his choice of words and wording. He loves and yet he is crucified. The poem is full of contradictions: 'nescio' and 'sentio' for example, 'I don't know' and 'I know' respectively, help to truly put his thought process and grievance into perspective. This also forms and therefore ends with a tricolon cresens as he moves from his not knowing vs. knowing to the fact that he is tortured. It's as if I always picture him finishing this poem by grasping his head with his hand and pulling it down to mask his face as he says those last words in an almost overly dramatic representation.
Cicero: Pro Caelio, part III ||
Sed intellegis pro tua praestanti prudentia, Cn. Domiti, cum hac sola rem esse nobis. Quae si se aurum Caelio commodasse non
dicit
, si venenum ab hoc sibi paratum esse non
arguit,
so petulanter facimus, si matrem familias secus quam matro- narum sanctitas postulat
nominamus
.
Sin ista muliere

remota
nec crimen ullum nec opes ad oppugnandum M. Caelium illis relinquuntur, quid est aliud quod nos patroni facere debeamus,
nisi ut
eos qui insectantur repellamus?
Quod quidem

facerem
vehementius,

nisi

intercederent

mihi inimicitiae cum istius mulieris viro
—fratrem volui dicere; semper hic erro. Nunc
agam
modice nec longius progrediar quam me mea fides et causa ipsa coget: nec enim muliebris umquam inimicitias
mihi gerendas

putavi
, praesertim cum
ea quam omnes semper
amicam omnium potius quam
cuiusquam inimicam
putaverunt.
But before your outstanding knowledge of the events, Gnaeus Domitius, you know our place here is with this woman alone. Should she not say that she herself provided Caelius with such gold, if she does not show that he prepared to poison her himself, we otherwise make poorly by using a mother's name in a way other than a matron's sanctity. When this woman has been removed they can neither leave behind the judgement nor help the attack against Marcus Caelius, what else is there which we patrons should do, except to repel those who pursue us?
Indeed I would be doing this more vehemently, if the hostilities were not obstructing me with the husband of this such woman
- I meant to say her brother; I always make that mistake. Now I will act with moderation and I will proceed no longer than my loyalties and this case force me. For I never thought that the hostility towards a woman would be carried with me, especially with she whom everyone always thought of as a "friend" to all instead of an enemy to anyone.
This is my favourite translation because it is a Cicero oration which I actually find entertaining and funny. He goes out of his way to entertain those standing to judge which makes for an entertaining read although it was also entertaining to talk about in class were it was read aloud. It was also one of the first poems I outlined and therefore was not as difficult to translate. It was also, similar to my favourite Catullus poem contained a chiasmus which I was able to pick up which gor one reason or another got me very excited.
Sed tamen ex ipsa quaeram prius utrum me secum severe et graviter et prisce agere malit, an remisse et leniter et urbane. Si illo austero more ac modo, aliquis mihi ab inferis excitandus est ex barbatis illis, non hac barbula qua ista delectatur sed illa horrida quam in statuis antiquis
atque imaginibus videmus, qui obiurget mulierem et qui

pro me loquatur ne mihi ista forte suscenseat. Exsistat
igitur ex hac ipsa familia aliquis ac potissimum Caecus ille;
minimum enim dolorem capiet qui istam non videbit. Qui
profecto, si exstiterit, sic aget ac sic loquetur: 'Mulier,
quid tibi cum Caelio, quid cum homine adulescentulo, quid

cum alieno ? Cur aut tam familiaris fuisti ut aurum com-
modares, aut tam inimica ut venenum timeres ? Non patrem tuum videras, non patruum, non avum, non proavum, non abavum, non atavum audieras consules fuisse;
This poem for one reason or another was the one that I had the most trouble with in recent memory. Perhaps it was because I thought the questions were awkward to translate and the word order just didnt seem as straight forward as it had with the other Cicero translations. This could also be because at one point due to the use of the passive paraphrastic which I at the time did not really undersrand. After we went over it in class though, I was able to pick an understanding of what it was I wasnt getting. I really need to outline before I translate more often.
A thought about the year as a whole
Overall this year as felt like a pretty big success for me. I began the year with a little more conviction than I think I had in other years in regards to my wanting to improve my ability to translate and not get flustered with it. In the end, I think I accomplished this. This was mostly reflected in my test scores which were for the most part much better than they had been in the past: a product of really trying to prepare and study for them. This half of the year also contained new projects, some of which I really enjoyed. Perhaps my main drive in trying to ensure my active awareness of homeworks and understanding the translations was due to the fact that they had all become group work and if my part wasn't completed and completed right than not only would the story not make sense but that would create more work for them yet as they would have had to go back and do that for me. Thats not to say that I didn't have my struggles here to there with them but when we talked them out in the groups I was usually able to understand and correct my mistake which was something that I struggled with prior.

The Cultural Project||
The Cicero Children's story
The cultural project that I was most proud of was the children's story that we, in small groups, created to display and convey the ideas of his Second Philippic. The oration concerned itself with his airing of grievances against Mark Antony in an attempt to get the republic to see how terrible he was. For this project we created a picture book with small little passages that described the pictures and fell in stride with the main events as depicted by Cicero in his philippic.
The Process
For this particular project my group and I first read through the work together, pointing out the major events as we went. After we compiled a set of ten, we decided on what the actual work load of each person. It was decided that one of our members would draw the 10 pictures whilst the other created the captions and then I digitized and formatted it all to put it all together. The actual process of creating the book dealt with first scanning all the pictures on to the computer. I then went over the lines with various colours set on very low opacity so the lines would show through, just appeared coloured. The next step from there was to layout the order and pair the pictures with the text. This had to be done carefully as there needed to be two sets to each page and these sets had to be carefully arranged so when they were folded and bound together, they would be in order. That was probably the part that took the longest. When that was finished I was able to fit the bound (sewed together) pages to a binding which consisted of cardboard that had been cut into three pieces, the spine, front and back covers all held together by a strip of canvas glued to the spine. the cardboard itself had been covered with canvas to provide the cover of the book. That is what the pages were then glued to. All that was left to do when it was all dry was glue some coloured pieces of paper to the inside covers to cover the cardboard there and give it a traditional hardcover book feel. We were all very proud of the little book which we had named "Mark Antony, Why's you steal our Republic (that could also be country). We ended up getting an A on the project.
Translations
This year we focused on many different translations. The second half of the year these consisted of Plautus and Ovid.
Menaechmi:
The Hard Times

MEN. Nummum a me accipe:     290
iube te piari de mea pecunia.
nam equidem insanum esse te certo scio,
qui mihi molestu's homini ignoto, quisquis es.
CYL. Cylindrus ego sum: non nosti nomen meum?
MEN. Si tu Cylindrus seu Coriendrus, perieris.                 295
ego te non novi, neque novisse adeo volo.
CYL. Est tibi Menaechmo nomen, tantum quod sciam.
MEN. Pro sano loqueris, quom me appellas nomine.
sed ubi novisti me?
CYL. Vbi ego te noverim,
qui amicam habes eram meam hanc Erotium?                 300
MEN. Neque hercle ego habeo, neque te quis homo sis scio.
CYL. Non scis quis ego sim, qui tibi saepissime
cyathisso apud nos, quando potas?
Men: Accepted the money:
You order for me to purify my money.
For I know it is truly insane to be you certain
What is troublesome to my man is unknown, whatever it is.
Cyl: I am Cylindrus: don't you know my name?
Men: If you [are] Cylindrus or if you are Coriendrus, may you perish.
I do not know you, nor do I want to start knowing you.
Cyl: You're name is Menaechmo, as far as I know.
Men: You say just as sane, with you calling my name.
Men: But where do you know me (from)?
Cyl: (You ask) where do I know you (from),
What do you have my friend the mistress of the house this Erotium?
Men:By hercules, neither have I nor do I know who you this man is.
Cyl: I don't know who it is, who often we ladle wine from the mixing-
bowl to the drinking cup near you, how much do you drink?
This translation was a little difficult for me as there were assumed words. The other issue was the fact that being that this is a play the characters constantly change so it's difficult to remember who is talking at times and sometimes you miss who the conversation is being directed at though this was very obviously directed at one or the other. It was also confusing because this is a play of errors so their mutual confusion sought to confuse me as well.
Ovid: The danger days
Primus amor Phoebi Daphne Peneia, quem non
fors ignara dedit, sed saeva Cupidinis ira.
Delius hunc nuper, victa serpente superbus,
viderat adducto flectentem cornua nervo; 455
'quid' que 'tibi, lascive puer, cum fortibus armis?'
dixerat: 'ista decent umeros gestamina nostros,
qui dare certa ferae, dare vulnera possumus hosti,
qui modo pestifero tot iugera ventre prementem
stravimus innumeris tumidum Pythona sagittis.* 460
tu face nescio quos esto contentus amores
inritare tua, nec laudes adsere nostras!'
filius huic Veneris 'figat tuus omnia, Phoebe,
te meus arcus' ait; 'quantoque animalia cedunt
cuncta deo, tanto minor est tua gloria nostra.' 465
dixit et eliso percussis aere pennis
inpiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce
eque sagittifera prompsit duo tela pharetra
diversorum operum: fugat hoc, facit illud amorem;
quod facit, auratum est et cuspide fulget acuta, 470
quod fugat, obtusum est et habet sub harundine plumbum.
hoc deus in nympha Peneide fixit, at illo
laesit Apollineas traiecta per ossa medullas;

Peneian Daphne was the first love of Phoebus Apollo,
which senseless chance did not give, but the savage wrath of Cupid.
Recently the Delian one (Apollo), proud because the snake had been defeated by him,
had seen [Cupid] flexing the bow with the bowstring having been contracted;
and he had said, “What’s it to you, playful boy, with strong weapons(bow and arrows)?
These burdens are fitting for our shoulders,
(we) who are able to give certain wounds to a wild animal, and thus to the enemy,
we who just now laid out the swollen Python covering acres
with so deadly an underside with countless arrows.
Be content to provoke loves with a torch which I don’t know
and do not lay claim to my praise!”
The son of Venus says to him, “Although your bow can pierce everything, Apollo,
my bow will pierce you [figet]”; “and by as much as all animals
concede to a god, so much smaller is your fame [than] ours.”
He said this and [air?] was expelled by wings [which] were beat;
tireless, he made a stand on the shady hilltop of Parnasus
and brought forth two spears by a quiver loaded with arrows
of differing work: this one drives [love] away, that one creates love;
[the one] which creates [love], is golden and glistens with a sharp point,
[the one] which drives away [love], is dull and has lead beneath the shaft.
This god pierced daughter of the river god Peneus, but
wounded the bones of Apollo through the marrow, which was pierced;
This one was though my favourite, also a bit troublesome. Lines 454 and 455 were troublesome due to the word play as we weren't sure as to who the lines pertained to.
Peneian Daphne was the first love of Phoebus Apollo,
which senseless chance did not give, but the savage wrath of Cupid.
Recently the Delian one (Apollo), proud because the snake had been defeated by him,
had seen [Cupid] flexing the bow with the bowstring having been contracted;
and he had said, “What’s it to you, playful boy, with strong weapons(bow and arrows)?
These burdens are fitting for our shoulders,
(we) who are able to give certain wounds to a wild animal, and thus to the enemy,
we who just now laid out the swollen Python covering acres
with so deadly an underside with countless arrows.
Be content to provoke loves with a torch which I don’t know
and do not lay claim to my praise!”
The son of Venus says to him, “Although your bow can pierce everything, Apollo,
my bow will pierce you [figet]”; “and by as much as all animals
concede to a god, so much smaller is your fame [than] ours.”
He said this and [air?] was expelled by wings [which] were beat;
tireless, he made a stand on the shady hilltop of Parnasus
and brought forth two spears by a quiver loaded with arrows
of differing work: this one drives [love] away, that one creates love;
[the one] which creates [love], is golden and glistens with a sharp point,
[the one] which drives away [love], is dull and has lead beneath the shaft.
This god pierced daughter of the river god Peneus, but
wounded the bones of Apollo through the marrow, which was pierced;
Primus amor Phoebi Daphne Peneia, quem non
fors ignara dedit, sed saeva Cupidinis ira.
Delius hunc nuper, victa serpente superbus,
viderat adducto flectentem cornua nervo; 455
'quid' que 'tibi, lascive puer, cum fortibus armis?'
dixerat: 'ista decent umeros gestamina nostros,
qui dare certa ferae, dare vulnera possumus hosti,
qui modo pestifero tot iugera ventre prementem
stravimus innumeris tumidum Pythona sagittis.* 460
tu face nescio quos esto contentus amores
inritare tua, nec laudes adsere nostras!'
filius huic Veneris 'figat tuus omnia, Phoebe,
te meus arcus' ait; 'quantoque animalia cedunt
cuncta deo, tanto minor est tua gloria nostra.' 465
dixit et eliso percussis aere pennis
inpiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce
eque sagittifera prompsit duo tela pharetra
diversorum operum: fugat hoc, facit illud amorem;
quod facit, auratum est et cuspide fulget acuta, 470
quod fugat, obtusum est et habet sub harundine plumbum.
hoc deus in nympha Peneide fixit, at illo
laesit Apollineas traiecta per ossa medullas;

Ovid: The happy days
While difficult, this was also my favourite translation. There was lots of interesting word play such as the slaying of the snake laying out across two lines showed by an ABBA chiasmus (
innumeris

tumidum Pythona

sagittis
.), the descriptions of the arrows were interesting and the level of comprehension and ableness with translating fascinated me even if there were sections of difficulty.
ER. Quid est?
MESS. Vbi tu hunc hominem novisti?
ER. Ibidem, ubi hic me iam diu,
in Epidamno.
MESS.In Epidamno? qui huc in hanc urbem pedem,            380
nisi hodie, numquam intro tetulit?
ER. Heia, delicias facis.
mi Menaechme, quin, amabo, is intro? hic tibi erit rectius.
MEN. Haec quidem edepol recte appellat meo me mulier nomine.
nimis miror, quid hoc sit negoti.
MESS. Oboluit marsuppium
huic istuc quod habes.
Er: What is it?

Mess: Where do you know that man from?

Er: In this same place, where long ago this man has known me
in Epidamnus

Mess: In Epidamnus? He who never walked in the city until today
but did not come in?

Er: Come now, you make easy joke.
My Menachnus, why don't you go, please, in? It will be better for you here.

Men:This woman, by pollux, most certainly knows the name which I am called upon
Indeed this woman, by pollux, calls me by my right name correctly.
I very much wonder, what is this business.

Mess: The purse, which you hold to you,
has given off a smell to her.


This was my favourite Plautus translation for various reasons. It was funny, it was easy, and it was not too difficult that I had much trouble with it.
Menaechmues, the awesome times:
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