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The Explosion

An essay Noah Thompson
by

Noah Thompson

on 12 October 2012

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Transcript of The Explosion

The Explosion is a life based poem on the life of a coal miner. In the poem Larkin describes a coal mining town and an explosion in the towns coal mine. He describes the families emotions of the families that have lost a loved one in the explosion. The Explosion The setting of this poem is in a mining town in the country side of Whales, England. Setting The mood of this poem is very intergetic, as the author uses personification to capture the reader. It is also a sad poem mentioning the morning of the deceased miners from the explosion that occured in the poem. The conflict in this poem is the miners fighting the tremendous pressure. They know that at anyime the roof could cave in on them, and they still have to go do there job for there family. Conflicts Philip Larkin Philip Larkin was born August 9th, 1922. His parents raised him in Coventry, England just outside of London. He was mostly in school for his young life studying at King Henry VIII school and also Oxford. In 1940 his first poem was published in the listeners section of national weekly titled "Ultimatum."From then on to 1977 he published many novels including "The Explosion." In 1984 he received an honorary doctorate of literature from Oxford University. From then on his life started to slow down . Then a year later he died of throat cancer on December 2nd, 1985. Purpose The pupose of this poem was to inform prople of the dangers miners face everyday. Personification There are several instances were personifiction is used in this poem. For example in lines 1-3 of the poem:"On the day of the explosion Shadows pointed towards the pithead:In the sun the slagheap slept."This is describing the smoke coming from the pithead or the opening to the mine. on page 1266 By: Philip Larkin THE EXPLOSION Personification 2 Mood Another example of personification in lines 13-15:"At noon, there came a tremor; cows Stopped chewing for a second; sun, Scarfed as in a heat-hazed, dimmed. This gives you a picture of an explosion in the mine. Shacking the earth, and producing a giant cloud of smoke out of the mine. Lines 4-6 "Down the lane come men in pitboots
Coughing oath-egded talk and pipe-smoke,
Shouldering off the freshined silence." This is giving you a visual of the men coming out of the mine and they are coughing out coal smoke. While they are Thanking God that they are alive. "The dead go before us, they
Are sitting in God's house in comfort,
We shall se them face to face-" This statment is describing the deceased as in the house of God, and that soon we will all be reunited in the house of God. Lines 16-18 Lines 1-12 On the day of the explosion
Shadows pointed toward the pithead:
In the sun the slagheap slept.

Down the lane came men in pitboots
Coughing oath-edged talk and pipe-smoke,
Shouldering off the freshined silence.

One chased affter rabbits; lost them;
Came back with a nest of lark's eggs;
Showed them; lodged them in the grasses.

So they passed in beards and moleskins,
Fathers, brothers, nicknames, laughter,
Through the tall gates standing open. Lines 1-12 analysis These first 12 lines of this poem start out on the day of the explosion. at the mine. It describes the opening of the mine afte the exploson. Then moves on to describing the miners coming out of the explosion choked on the coal dust of the explosion. Then the poem goes into detail on the actions of the miners that have great joy that they survived the explosion. In the last part of these few line the miners walk out of the front gate of the mine rejoicing in the fact tha they survived the explosion. Lines 13-25 At non, there came a tremor; cows
Stopped chewing for a second; sun,
Scarfed as in a heat-haze, dimmed.

The dead go on before us, they
Are sitting in God's house in comfort,
We shall see them face to face-

Plain as lettering in the chapels
It was said, and for a second
Wives saw men of the explosion

Larger than in life they managed-
Gold as ona coin, or walking
Somehow from the sun towards them,

One showing the eggs unbroken. Lines 13-25 analysis Thes lines start by describing the explosion itself as it shook the ground.Then Larkin is talking about how the wives of the men who died in the explosion are seeing them in their dreams. They see them carreing coal described as gold. Poem Analysis Overall this poem sent the message that coal miners are brave. Not only for working in the face of death a any time, but also for working in the worst of conditions. Mr. Larkin gets this message to the reader by describing the tremendous explosion in vivid detail. Also while he lets you know miners survived he also lets you know that some miners died, and will forever be remembered. http://www.philiplarkin.com/biog.htm http://www.google.com/imgres?q=coal+mine+explosion&num=10&hl=en&biw=1024&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=KIYoubxcLWOQAM:&imgrefurl=http://www.netl.doe.gov/newsroom/100yr/history.html&docid=jz_U4VE7W9BQNM&imgurl=http://www.netl.doe.gov/newsroom/100yr/images/MineBlast_lg.jpg&w=800&h=540&ei=7P5oUPfpJJSG9QShn4GACA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=712&vpy=163&dur=43&hovh=184&hovw=273&tx=140&ty=114&sig=100838448251033267818&page=1&tbnh=151&tbnw=210&start=0&ndsp=12&ved=1t:429,r:3,s:0,i:82 http://www.google.com/imgres?q=coal+mining+towns&num=10&hl=en&biw=1024&bih=680&tbm=isch&tbnid=cRJNTa3my3dbzM:&imgrefurl=http://www.treorchymalechoir.com/history/mining.htm&docid=tPDzrvUL7JdfwM&imgurl=http://www.treorchymalechoir.com/history/mining/Abergorky%252520Colliery%252520%252520c.jpg&w=455&h=295&ei=Zv9oUOjUA5Hm8QS_0IDgBg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=314&vpy=319&dur=371&hovh=181&hovw=279&tx=188&ty=129&sig=100838448251033267818&page=2&tbnh=146&tbnw=205&start=15&ndsp=16&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:15,i:143
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